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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Does it really just boil down to ergonomics and price? Looking for a machine that will leave a nice finish cut with a 60" MMM that's relatively easy to get on and off, has a decent loader, and can drive at least a 54" rear mount snowblower. I like the idea of keeping the loader on to help manage snow in winter and use for ballast when snow blowing. Mostly the machine will be used for mowing and clearing a 400" somewhat steep driveway in northern New England. Honestly I'd go with a smaller machine if it were just mowing, but the snow clearing warrants something more robust I think.

I made a spreadsheet comparing specs, but aside from all that what is it I don't know about these brands/models that I should be considering? All of them seem to be sourced with components from southeast Asia or Japan and to some degree are assembled in the states. Any noteworthy differences between engine makers and hydros they are using? What about build quality aspects? Things like frame and deck gauge, PTO rod thickness etc. How about material quality? Some are using aluminum for certain components, others brag about cast iron and steel. I cant keep track. The Deere 1023 has a lot of convenience with implements and a solid loader but Kubota performance specs beat it and I dont think the 1023e will run a rear blower. Kioti CS2210 is aggressively priced and the fastest >10mph, but I cant find info about what its like removing the deck on this. I haven't looked into the gc1705 much yet, but it sounds like a great machine and I plan to see it in a few days. I am fortunate to have all 4 dealers within about an hour. Deere right across town, massey and kubota within 45mins. Kioti is about an hour by highway.

Yes I will upload the spreadsheet once I finish a few data points :tango_face_grin:
 

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My son, who is an engineer that researches EVERY purchase he makes, recently bought a 50hp MF with a loader and a brush hog. He compared several brands and ended up with this one.
 

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Ergonomics is the big one. Will you feel comfortable after riding it for 8 hours?

My favourite colour is red, but I did try out the orange and the green before I splurged. I have no regrets.
 

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This is actually a fun adventure your about to embark on. They don't come around often. You will cut yourself short if you don't get out to all those dealers, talk to them, sit on and test out each and every tractor on your spread sheet. That is how you'll know which machine fits you best without any regrets....
I have none....
Good luck
 

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They are all fine tractors and every one of them should provide you with years of dependable service if properly maintained. The main factors you should consider are:

1. Comfort/ergonomics (subjective and only you can decide what's best for you)

2. Dealer experience
a. Proximity of dealership to you
b. Friendliness/quality of relationship and service (find other customers to ask, or look on-line for reviews)
c. Your gut feeling when you talk to the sales and service folks (if you feel uncomfortable talking to them or feel that they're not being truthful before the sale, then it probably won't get better after the sale)​


3. Price.
 

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I am going through the same process now. With those tractor except with slightly different needs as I'm in VA and have no need for a snow blower. However I'll have a 4' tiller, 4' brush hog eventually.

And I also have a spreadsheet. Pm me your email address and we can trade.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Update.... Massey wins! Pictures attached. Main factors boiled down to ability to drive a rear snowblower, price, ergonomics, warm and fuzzy with the dealer/local support. Paying cash, Massey handily beat everyone for an FEL, rear snowblower, and 60" MMM package. Financed price was second lowest all-in. It definitely helped the Massey having good design ergonomics and build quality. Others seem to have their quirks in certain areas.

In order for Deere to drive a rear snowblower one dealer recommended the 1025 putting it about $6,000 premium over all others for the package I was looking for. Another deere dealer was willing to quote a 1023 with a 64" rear blower which I'm told would have voided the warranty. Don't know why but the 1023 only had a 14-15hp rear PTO. Both tractors had some cumbersome lever or control placement. Massey's are big and bright and comfortably within arms reach without stretching from the driver's seat. Deere, was only offering 60 months financing, everyone else 84 months.

Kubota was beaten across the board on specs, front and rear pedal placements weren't ideal. Being taller, the joystick located next to the seat left my arm dangling since my elbows don't get the rest on the armrests. I do think Kubota's quick connect 4 valve manifold for the loader hoses is a game changer. That will be the next big thing all manufactures probably adopt.

Kioti had some slop and slow response in the pedals. I didn't like how the hydraulic hoses were being rubbed by the pedals. A brand new tractor shouldn't have hoses getting shaved by pedals on the dealer lot. Overall though the CS2210 was specing out pretty strong on paper and had a competitive price. Despite some plastic on the body and floor panels it was the heaviest machine leading me to believe the weight may be coming from frame and transmission. Maintenance seemed a little awkward on Kioti. Hard to access fill ports for transmission fluid. There was no guard protecting the front facing transmission filter. Radiator was up front, so exhaust blew rearward toward operator. It was worth a little more to absolve all this with better engineering in Massey Fergusson

People asked for the spreadsheet I referenced comparing specs. Its a sum of stack ranks across many categories that were taken into consideration. Lower score wins (more #1's than 4's)
 

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Professional Homeowner
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Well congratulations on the new purchase!

I'm a little late to this party, and I see Sean beat me to the point about needing to like your dealer. Honestly I thought everyone would try and steer you toward the green one. Since they're the biggest company they must be the best machines, right? As you may have already learned, such may not be the case.

Everyone sees the machine they chose as the best choice for them. I guess it all boils down to what is most important to them. I think you made all the right moves when considering a new machine. Doing your homework like you did is the first step to avoid buyer's remorse. If you shop for a used machine, the price vs. condition becomes by far and away the most important factor.

You'll get used to the rear snowblower if you're not already. There's a... Technique to it. You'll find you can amost sit sideways on the seat, facing left. Left arm on the back of the seat, right hand steering. Right leg almost behind you operating the pedal. I typically run low range, pedal to the floor for most mowing and snowblowing operations, so it's even easier to control. You'll like having the extra coin in your pocket opting for the rear mount vs front mount, and that you won't have to switch back and forth between the blower and loader when you want to use one or the other. Don't forget - you'll probably be able to take the blower with you if you buy a different or slightly larger machine because it's a universal fit!

Helpful hint- move your ROPS mounted turn signals to the inside of your ROPS. Makes them a little more robust.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well congratulations on the new purchase!

Helpful hint- move your ROPS mounted turn signals to the inside of your ROPS. Makes them a little more robust.
I hate to admit but <5 minutes on the machine I became an official member of the bungee'd turn signal club. Seems like a right of passage with these. I think I'll leave it as is instead of gluing it since it technically has some give now if ever needed to breakaway again :tango_face_wink:, ...or move them to the inside. I almost wonder about mounting some spring loaded fence door hinges so they can give and return back into place would work.
 

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It takes a while to learn not to get too close to trees and walls with the flashers. I've had 8 or 9 lessons so far, I expect a few more before I have to quit using it. The other half of that coin is that you can also do damage to whatever the light makes contact with. The vinyl corner pieces on a house do not appreciate love taps from lights, even at slow speeds in the winter.

When I broke the first one, I checked at the dealer for the price of a replacement. I felt that $52 was a bit high and went to TSC and paid $6.95 for round instead of square signal lights.

Moving them to the inside has some decided advantages. It also has a couple of disadvantages. Install a cab and the lights have to move outside again, and you will not be in the habit of watching how close you are to walls and trees. I took out the glass dome on a power meter once. When working in the bushy part of the estate, tree branches can sometimes come between the ROPS and the operator when backing up. With the lights on the inside, there is less space between the lights and the operator, and one or the other is going to collect an attention getter.
 

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I've been thinking of replacing my lights with some LEDs and a simple bracket made from some angle. Maybe some small trailer lights. There are lots of different brackets out there on the market...
 

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Tony's Tractor Adventure
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Don't rule out the LS MT125. The price is very competitive and the warranty is long. I just bought one earlier this year and has done great. I have found a good local dealer also. I have owned a Kubota BX2200, a John Deere 1025R and Massey GC1705. Long story, but true, I have owned them all. My new LS MT125 has the Yanmar engine and is built like a tank. I retired a few years ago, got into making tractor videos. I have put up several on Youtube comparing the LS to my old tractors.

 

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After breaking mine, I just got 4 LED side rail lights and mounted them to the front and rear of the ROPS. Works great and no clearance issues.
 

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haven’t seen any MF SCUTs in my area, don’t even know of a dealer around here, but one thing I like about what I see it the pics on that unit is the ROPS. It’s short with no hinges like my 60 series BX. way less PITA


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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The short ROPS is only on the MF GC models that do not have a back hoe option. The tall, hinged ROPS are to prevent headaches for the operator sitting in the raised, backwards facing seat to operate the hoe.
 
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