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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings all… I am having a problem with my Yanmar 1700 tractor and was hoping to receive some tips as to what to do next. First off let me preface this by saying upfront that I am mechanically challenged, the only thing I do with my tractor is bush hog about 3 acres 3 times a year.

My tractor will not crank, I suspect it is not getting fuel. This is what I have tried so for.
Replaced the fuel filter ( which it needed desperately )
Bleeding the fuel system ( which is not working ).
I can get fuel to what I think is the injection pump but it goes no further.
The long lines that run from one side of the tractor to the other have no fuel in them.

Now I am lost and do not know what to do next. Does this tractor have a fuel pump? I know, stupid question but I really do not know. My next step would be to call someone out to fix it, no one will come out in this area they all want you to bring it in. Slight problem, it won’t crank... Thanks for any help.
 

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Welcome datadude!

Yanmars' are a wonderful machine....until they've lost their prime or run out of fuel (or you change the fuel filter) :D! Then, they can be the most stubborn, ungrateful beast of burden that’s diesel powered known to man. Especially the two cylinder models - but it’s a simple problem to fix if you go by the numbers:

1- Fill the tank with fresh diesel fuel
2- At the fuel filter/shut off valve, open the top left 6MM (with 10MM wrench) cap screw. Usually it’s a small Phillips #2 hex head bolt. Open this and allow a good (full) sloppy, messy and dribbling 10 seconds for fuel to run out. This purges any trapped air, which can be almost microscopic and not visible to the neaked eye…but it’s enough air to make your fuel injection pump refuse to pump the 2200PSI fuel spray to the injectors. GENTLY snug the bleed screw closed and proceed to the next one.
3- Do exactly the same thing to the next cap screw immediately at, and to the right (about 1 ½”) of the first bleed screw…allow a full 10 seconds. Then, GENTLY snug that bleed screw closed as well.
4- Next, and lastly, follow the fuel line from the fuel shut off valve (where you’ve just bled the first two screws). The fuel line will lead you to the top of the injection pump AND to the “Banjo” fitting, where the last bleed screw is located. Open (for the full 10 seconds), close gently and you should be all set to do the following.

5- Put the tractor in neutral, pull the throttle two thirds back, pull the decompression handle out fully, depress the clutch and spool (start) with ignition key and allow the engine to spin for 5 - 10 seconds. Let go of the decompression handle…and the engine will start. It might ’cough’, sputter and wheeze the first try…but it will start if you do (#5) all over again.

This will work 99% of the time on any YM series Yanmar, and most direct injection diesels that don’t have glow plugs.

If, for any reason, the above process doesn’t start you YM1700 then you have a problem (not a big problem though) with a pinched or broken “O” ring at the fuel filter jar, a hairline crack at the jar lip, or a broken/weather checked fuel line from the tank, fuel shut off valve and/or fuel line to the injection pump.

As simple and reliable as these Yanmar tractors are, the fuel injection pump is the most sophisticated part on the entire machine. If you think in terms of the pump as the heart of the machinery, like your own (human) heart, once air in ingested into the system, the pump tends to throw fits and pass out…just like we might :).

Mark
 

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Mark is completely correct if it won't START, but for reference, when you say it won't CRANK, that would mean to most of us that it won't turn over, i.e, nothing happens in response to turning the key, as in the starter is not turning the engine over or the engine is locked up.

Bleeding can be a two person job, as there should always be someone in the operator's seat when the engine is being cranked (Mark uses the word "spin), and sometimes you have to go all the way to the injectors to bleed it, esp. if you have already pushed air up the line.

Email us if you would like the general bleeding procedure as a pdf file...it's one page long.
 

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Welcome to the forum. You have received some great advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Greetings all... I followed the instructions and still a no go. The fuel flowed good out of all the holes. I loosened the lines that run to the other side of the engine and very little fuel came out it just kind of spit a little. Any ideas?
Where might the decompression handle be? I have never had to use that to start.

Thanks!
Bentley
 

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Greetings all... I followed the instructions and still a no go. The fuel flowed good out of all the holes. I loosened the lines that run to the other side of the engine and very little fuel came out it just kind of spit a little. Any ideas?
Where might the decompression handle be? I have never had to use that to start.

Thanks!
Bentley
Where in Alabama?

Danny
 
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