My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know the towing capacity (limit) for an XT3 GSX?

Planning on hauling some logs out of a nearby property the utility company cut. I also have a GT 2542 and remember reading it's capacity was about 1,500 lbs.

Stopping isn't an issue as the area is flat to a couple small hills. Destination is completely flat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,151 Posts
Are you going to be dragging the logs or are you using a trailer? That will make a very big difference.

Kinda related, but the lawn roller I have, a 24 X 36, is filled with sand and weighs roughly 940 pounds. My XT3 GSX barely knows it's there until I get to the marshy ground where traction goes to the wayside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·




Dragging using a log skidder. I have a 48" agrifab roller I fill with water and it's not an issue at all. Even for the 2500 tractor. I had a winch on my 2500 that I'd pull logs out with but I think the XT3 would be more capable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Your XT3 and 2542 have the same Hydro-Gear BDU-10 transmission.

Just fyi... ;)

Renster
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
Dragging it? Yikes, I dunno, one way to find out, I guess.

I've heard that a cubic yard of dirt is in the range of 2,000 pounds, I've pulled that on my utility trailer multiple times. But as was said, pulling that on wheels is very different that dragging it.

I've seen people talk about slipping something under the front of the log, to give it a lip that will slide better. Imagine a child's snow sled, or something like that.

Something to help keep it riding over the dirt at the front of the log, vs digging in, etc. And if more of the log can sit on this, that's probably better.

I guess I'd try it. But I'd be prepared to cut them into shorter sections. Dragging 1,500 lbs, with a ~1,000 lb machine, feels like an aggressive goal, to me. (edit, oops, sorry, your 1,500 lb reference was to a tow rating, not the log weight, but still, they're probably pretty heavy).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,151 Posts
Dragging it? Yikes, I dunno, one way to find out, I guess.

I've heard that a cubic yard of dirt is in the range of 2,000 pounds, I've pulled that on my utility trailer multiple times. But as was said, pulling that on wheels is very different that dragging it.

I've seen people talk about slipping something under the front of the log, to give it a lip that will slide better. Imagine a child's snow sled, or something like that.

Something to help keep it riding over the dirt at the front of the log, vs digging in, etc. And if more of the log can sit on this, that's probably better.

I guess I'd try it. But I'd be prepared to cut them into shorter sections. Dragging 1,500 lbs, with a ~1,000 lb machine, feels like an aggressive goal, to me. (edit, oops, sorry, your 1,500 lb reference was to a tow rating, not the log weight, but still, they're probably pretty heavy).

It's called a skid plate. Quite easy to make your own. You can get ideas from this:

 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,779 Posts
Hook onto it and pull. One of two things will happen, either the log moves, or the tires spin. In either case, the transmission will handle it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Renster of N.H.

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's called a skid plate. Quite easy to make your own. You can get ideas from this:

I didn't want to spend that much $$, Been pulling logs out with my old tractor but none this large in diameter. Will post some pics soon.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
I didn't want to spend that much $$, Been pulling logs out with my old tractor but none this large in diameter. Will post some pics soon.
I wouldn't spend that much either, but I don't think Flaken was really proposing buying one. Seems like DIY solutions might be viable. The scoop from a big shovel, for instance. Or just a section of plywood, or something along those lines.

Can't wait to see pics! It's fun seeing what these machines can do. Even if that does involve discovering the limits.

FWIW, I've heard people suggest connecting the load below the height of the axle, IIRC, so that if the tractor just pulls hard, you reduce the risk of the tractor trying to flip.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PA318Guy

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This was 1 of the logs we pulled out. Had to cut it in 2 due to muddy hill.



This is the other half of the big log. The skidder worked great.



Here's some of the smaller ones we pulled.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
Nice, glad it worked! It's tough to get a sense of scale from the picture. What size were the big ones?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
about this size. Just short of 2 ft. They were heavy

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
Oh wow! Yeah, at 2 feet, I'm sure that's pretty darn heavy. That is pretty cool.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,151 Posts
Yes, I did not imply that you should go out and buy something pricey, when log skid plates can be made for a fraction of the cost. You just need something to keep the front edge of the log from digging in which makes it harder on the tractor dragging it.

If you are curious as to the rough weight estimate of a log, this is a handy calculator:

 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top