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Discussion Starter #1
wondered if someone could explain to me if the governor adjustment on an x500 is easy screw adjustment or requires bending spring. I want to bring it up a hundred rpm. my tach is only reading 3200-3250 with blower engaged and no load!
I don't like the idea of bending springs where I might not be able to get it back where it is if the adjustment is wrong!
 

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My x500 has the Kawasaki FS730V engine. The Kawasaki engine's manual says that the carb factory set with a maximum RPM and "no attempt should be made to change the carb settings".

If you think the RPM is not at its maximum, try to track down all of the throttle linkage to be sure nothing has come loose, or been bent preventing the factory max RPM via a less than wide open throttle plate. I believe this twin's max power rating is stated at 3,600 RPM but may have been set lower by John Deere for their applications, I just don't know.

I personally would not fiddle with the governor, its springs, or bending anything unless it was already physically damaged and not operating properly. I believe the governor set up will only change the throttle position in response to engine load, and only within the engine's throttle range. Altering the governor would merely change (likely not in a good way) its throttle response to engine load. Put another way, the governor will not push it past the engine's set max throttle. Perhaps someone in the business could confirm or correct my impression of the governor's impact on the engine.

Your local JD service guy might give you some ideas if you think its not operating up to factor max RPMs.
 

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My x500 has the Kawasaki FS730V engine. The Kawasaki engine's manual says that the carb factory set with a maximum RPM and "no attempt should be made to change the carb settings".
I also have a X500 and the FS730V manual I have has an adjustment procedure for both low-idle and fast-idle (WOT).

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Discussion Starter #4
thank you, exactly what I was looking for!
can anyone tell me if this adjustment will tell the governor to keep the engine at this rpm under load!
 

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thank you, exactly what I was looking for!
can anyone tell me if this adjustment will tell the governor to keep the engine at this rpm under load!
On most small engines, when the governor is working properly it will maintain the engine speed at any RPM.
 

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Jg is correct in his statement. I think people get confused about the term "throttle". When you move your throttle lever, it really does nothing to the throttle plate/shaft in your carb.

The throttle lever sets the governor to a specific rpm. When the engine is started the governor moves/opens the throttle plate in the carb. As rpm increases to the governor setting you made with the throttle lever, the governor now holds the throttle pate at the position needed to maintain this rpm. If the rpm drops, due to load, the governor opens the throttle plate and the engine speeds up. The governor then moves the throttle plate to maintain the rpm. All of this is accomplished with centrifugal weights. As rpm increases, the weights expand/fly out, and the throttle plate closes somewhat. The opposite for a decrease in rpm.

It's actually a little more complicated internal, but that's the basic concept: Throttle lever sets governor, governor controls carb. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #7
my engine runs no load at 3350 when I engage the blower it drops to 3200 even with no snow in blower!so what I gather from the posts is,the throttle plate position is opened until the governor weight position is in the same place it was at 3350! so to check I would look in the throttle barrel and see the plate wide open and the engine not having enough power to run 3350! then I have a problem! better change plugs/air filter/ adjust valves to get the simple stuff out of the equation!
I always thought the grunt i heard when going into deeper snow was the engines throttle plate opening more to maintain rpm. guess I was wrong!
 

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donmac, To a point you're correct about "grunt". This "grunt" is the engine working harder. If you had am engine and it ran at 3350 rpm, no load, it would have a particular sound to it. Now you start to add a load, the governor will kick in to maintain rpm and the engine will have a deeper sound...cuz it's working harder. As you put more fuel into the engine, you get a bigger/louder "explosion" as the fuel burns. An engine will "purr" with no load and darn near "growl" fully loaded...overloaded, it just stalls! Bob
 

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Note that the limiting factor for maximum engine rpm is the maximum rated speed of the hydro input shaft. In this case, the K72 has a max rated input of 3400 rpm.

You do have a bit of wiggle room to modify the governor for additional engine rpm.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
what got my attention was the machine isn't throwing snow as far as it use to! I have had the tiny tach on it for a couple years now [installed it to monitor throttle freeze up which has happened to me and slight over rpm condition happens} watched it closely when first installed and it was running 3350 no matter the load conditions,recently I haven't been paying much attention to it as we've had little snow to blow and weather has been mild!.. I installed a new blower belt last week thinking maybe the old one was glazed and slipping, new one showed no improvement, then I looked at the tach and noticed my rpm was down, well that will "certainly" do it!
now is the time to fix it because it's hard to reproduce these load conditions in the summer! got a recent 6"dump of snow so lots of testing ground!
 

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Yup, rpm is one of the main keys for throwing snow. Check what you stated in your thread #7, but don't overlook the carb. If you load your engine and don't have enough fuel or proper mixture going in, you won't produce the hp needed. Can be anything from minor adjustment to replacing filter(s), fuel lines, or pump!

I always chuckle to myself when I read posts about changing/putting in new spark plugs, I bought a used 314 in '82, lost it in a divorce in 2010, and it had the points and plugs in that it came with in '82 when I lost it I never pulled the plug, cleaned, or gaped it, just hit the key and did whatever I planned on doing! And the tractor was used year round: mow 2 acres of grass in summer, plus other yard work, and cleared CT snow with a blade and/or a 49. During the divorce proceedings, I moved in with my parents...mostly to take care of them!... and bought another 314 in 2000. Same story, plug that it came with and running fine!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm alway's questioning plugs beacause my trailgator eats them up annualy! it developes a miss and changing plugs runs for another 500hrs, faithfully!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I had a chance to get at the machine today, put some new plugs in and adjusted the valves,they were at zero clearance and had to back off the adjustment about half a turn. not too sure why this is happening, unless the valves are recessing into the valve seats! you would think clearances would get larger with cam wear, lifter,ro,rocker wear not smaller! anyway, it made no difference to starting or wot rpm! I didn't take it out to blow snow because it was raining, maybe tomorrow, I can put a load on it and see if it holds rpm better!
one thing I did notice when I had my nose in there, the rod that comes up to the carb for throttle control has a spring running along side it and the springs long straight section before the hook on the end seems to be wrapped around the rod at least once, anybody elses like that!
 

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I had a chance to get at the machine today, put some new plugs in and adjusted the valves,they were at zero clearance and had to back off the adjustment about half a turn. not too sure why this is happening, unless the valves are recessing into the valve seats! you would think clearances would get larger with cam wear, lifter,ro,rocker wear not smaller! anyway, it made no difference to starting or wot rpm! I didn't take it out to blow snow because it was raining, maybe tomorrow, I can put a load on it and see if it holds rpm better!
I think it is because the rocker adjusters move over time. The eccentric shoulder bolts are not one of my favorite designs.

one thing I did notice when I had my nose in there, the rod that comes up to the carb for throttle control has a spring running along side it and the springs long straight section before the hook on the end seems to be wrapped around the rod at least once, anybody elses like that!
I looked in the technical manual (FS730V engine) and it shows rod #17 below running through all of the coils on spring #16 coming from the governor bellcrank #18.

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Discussion Starter #15
thanks for the pic. The engine is definately louder now, can hear a little clatter in the rockers,but it hasn't been run hard,maybe when it gets to full working temp the push rods will expand enough to reduce play! I coudn't see clearly down where the spring coils are but could see the spring 16 wrapped around the rod a full turn until hooked to #7.I'm thinking maybe this is done to prevent chaffing on the spring by keeping it tight against the rod My engine is FH721V setup looks the same!
 

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thank you, exactly what I was looking for!
can anyone tell me if this adjustment will tell the governor to keep the engine at this rpm under load!
I think that you are misunderstanding the concept of what a governor does. Those adjustments for the low and high idle settings are to the carburetor controls, not the governor. The governor does not contorol minimum or maximum trhrottle or rpm's unless it is not adjusted properly or is worn to the point where it is impeding the full range of motion of the carb controls. When the governor is adjusted and working properly it should maintain whatever rpm the throttle control is set at as the load varies. If the governor is not maintaining the set rpm's as the load varies then there may be separate adjustments for the governor linkage itself, but I am not sure where those may be on that model. Or in the worst case the governor itself may be worn or damaged and may need replacing. But set the low and high idle3 settings properly first and then worry about whether the governor might not maintain proper rpm's under varying loads.
 
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