My Tractor Forum banner
21 - 38 of 38 Posts

· Premium Member
Joined
·
16,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks for the reminder, Don!!!

I forgot to mention, that's the company that does all the service on my RV, as well as state inspections, since 2006. Very fair, unquestionably the most honest shop I've ever dealt with for any vehicle, ever, since I started driving in 1985.

For my 29-year-old RV, they've even fabricated NLA parts. To replace the leaking fuel fill line a year or two ago, they barely charged a couple of hours of labor. They somehow got one of the triple-jointed mechanics to get his arm in there without having to empty and completely drop the tank, which would have been an all-day job by the book!

The driver mentioned just taking the trailer back to the shop with him, but when he called in, they told him they don't have room for it right now, and are booked for two weeks.

Again, this isn't going anywhere anytime soon...

When I do get around to fixing up the trailer, at a minimum, I'll let them do the tires and inspection. I'll do the brakes (planning to replace everything including bearings while I have it apart) and ALL wiring first. Will upgrade the lights to LED if they're incandescent (as I suspect they are).

Alternatively, I'll pull the tires, throw them onto my smaller trailer, and have them replaced while I work on the brakes and wiring. Then, throw the new tires on and bring it to them for inspection.

Mike
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
16,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
If I still own this truck by the time I get the trailer roadworthy, I plan to visit the dealership and ask all of those questions. I don't SEE a brake controller, and don't KNOW the hitch rating, so I'm not going to ASSUME anything.

My preference would be to have a more substantial truck for the job, we'll see what happens.

Unless I suddenly need to start farming myself out as a traveling excavator guy, I really don't see myself going very far with the backhoe. Maybe just the trailer, we'll see.

Mike
 

· Premium Member
I use scissors! Twice a week.
Joined
·
10,987 Posts
I wonder if it could be converted to surge brakes. Are those considered to be as safe as electric brakes?

Are electric brakes fail-safe like truck air brakes? In other words, do they use power to release? That would seem safer if the battery died (unless that only matters during breakaway, in which case, it's game over anyways).

Mike
The 'fail' mode for electric trailer brakes is like I described earlier in the thread, the trailer has a small battery, typically kept charged up when connected to the towing vehicle (but should be trickle charged if not going to be used for some time, it's typically just a regular lead-acid battery). When the trailer breaks free, the safety cord pulls out a pin, connecting the battey to the brakes, activating them.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
16,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
Put your new wire harness in plastic loom and you won't have to worry about abrasions. Well worth the effort and minimal cost.

Agreed, 1000% and thensome. I have too much (bad) experience here. Mice crawled into the tongue of my last boat trailer and destroyed one set of wires on me. I've had others fray over time as well.

My plan for all future trailer rewiring jobs is massive overkill...

I'll use extension cords, inside narrow plastic conduits, so the mice can't get in, and there's more insulation. Where flexibility is needed near the termination points, I could use wire loom.

All lights will be directly wired (including individual ground wires for each) back to a junction box. That way, if one wire breaks, I only lose one light (not multiple), and don't have to rely on using the trailer as a ground conductor (rusty connections don't help conduct electricity).

My approach for the brake wires will be similar.

I'll probably set it up for a removable connector wire (trailer to vehicle). Saw this on YouTube a while ago (need to find the link later). Basically, you install a female connector on the trailer tongue (connected to the junction box), and make a connector wire with two male ends.

The connector wire (trailer to vehicle) gets removed except when towing. That should help keep the connector wire safe, free from debris and corrosion, etc.

Mike
 
  • Like
Reactions: Steve Urquell

· Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
So admittedly i havent used trailer brakes but ive done a crapload of brake work (including some on trailers) and have wired electric brakes, brake controllers etc..

Electric brakes have constant power and the controller gives the brakes ground to activate.

Surge brakes (which are hydraulic) in theory could be much stronger than electric brakes, but it probably depends how they’re adjusted.

Not having used them, i would expect trailer brakes, based on their design, to not do very much at low speeds. Which is probably fine.

Also, the electric brakes ive seen i believe will not do ANYTHING in reverse because the magnet acts on an arm very similar to what the ebrake cable pulls on in normal drum brakes. It would only do something in one direction. However, i can picture a design which would work both directions, and that would need to use that reverse light wire (along with a control box with a relay or solid state relay) to bypass the brakes while reversing.

Nice purchase!
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
16,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thank you, @Vigo!

Mike
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
16,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Ugh, struck out with the trailer vendor, he doesn't have records going that far back.

He did say that it most likely was built by PJ or Load Trail, but branded as a Wright.

He said it's most likely a 7,000 lb GVWR trailer, but offered no other info.

He suggested registering it as homemade, but that they might lower the GVWR rating.

Again, I'm not in a rush here, but was hopeful that he'd have some records...

Mike
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,702 Posts
Just a note here hydraulic brakes will push the tow vehicle before activating. If you like being pushed down hill before the trailer brakes work, go for it. I like them to work when I want them to. Not when they want to. Also, electric brakes can be adjusted for the load in tow. Hydraulic brakes are what they are and that's all they will be without changing them. Away that's my opinion.
 
Joined
·
6,636 Posts
Ugh, struck out with the trailer vendor, he doesn't have records going that far back.

He did say that it most likely was built by PJ or Load Trail, but branded as a Wright.

He said it's most likely a 7,000 lb GVWR trailer, but offered no other info.

He suggested registering it as homemade, but that they might lower the GVWR rating.

Again, I'm not in a rush here, but was hopeful that he'd have some records...

Mike
Mike, Wright is the dealer. Here's one almost identical to yours. It doesn't have the dove tail.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
2,591 Posts
Mike, your trailer was made here. Kind of neat how they make these.

MC,

That was an interesting video, I liked how they lifted the deck boards in the center to set them in place. I have a 16' trailer that will need a new deck one day. Piece of cake if I can get the boards to flex!

CCMoe
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
16,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 · (Edited)
I "contacted" (I hate when companies use those contact forms and don't give an actual email address) both PJ and Load Trail (a few weeks ago, actually). Never heard back from either, beyond the automated reply saying that they received my info. I'll try calling at some point.

I've been clearing the pine needles off the trailer, probably should have done that before buying (although I doubt it would have changed the price by much). I'm finding plenty of surface rot on the deck boards. I'll try to get pics later.

I've seen videos like those above before, long boards look easy. I need to replace several in the dovetail section. I'm hoping not to have to remove the welded cross-piece (on top), but some the videos I've seen have done that.

This guy cut his cross-piece (jump to 2:10):


This guy didn't (jump to 3:35):


I'm in zero rush to do this, and am afraid of turning this into a giant project, but I'm sure stripping and painting will become necessary at some point, like @PA318Guy had done a few years ago.

Mike
 
  • Like
Reactions: PA318Guy

· Premium Member
Joined
·
16,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Here are some pics of the damaged wood. The rot isn't incredibly deep, so this isn't a "right now" job by any stretch of the imagination...

Brown Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire
Brown Wood Road surface Asphalt Grey
Brown Road surface Wood Brickwork Rectangle
Wood Road surface Asphalt Trunk Plant
Wood Road surface Grey Trunk Asphalt
Brown Wood Road surface Grass Trunk
Rectangle Wood Road surface Grey Brickwork


I'll wait to do this repair until after I get the Terramite's leaks fixed [it's bleeding hydraulic fluid (oil) all over the deck].

Mike
 
  • Like
Reactions: UrbanTractor
21 - 38 of 38 Posts
Top