My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
You think it would tear up the lawn? I usually only mow when it's pretty dry, couple tight turns around trees. Mostly flat yard, just wanted a more aggressive tire for when winter comes. Never liked the idea of chains..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
How do u think it would perform on steeper ditches? And what about winter performance?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
How do u think it would perform on steeper ditches? And what about winter performance?
I filled mine for extra traction. We have a lot of change in elevation here in north georgia and I mow when wet and dry. You will quickly learn to keep them from spinning. Rarely have any trouble but filling them made a huge difference.
 

·
Diesel Power
Joined
·
5,340 Posts
How do u think it would perform on steeper ditches? And what about winter performance?
I guess you're asking about traction. So in steep ditches they would work well but again when you start talking about steep anything the likelihood of those bad-boys spinning is greater. If they spin you are tossing turf. I've always heard that Ags are not great in snow, and that tread pattern is Ags on steroids, so I would not expect optimal snow traction from them. You'd be better off with HDAPS for chain-less snow traction. .e.g Carlisle HD Field Trax
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
I can't speak to the winter performance but mine to great in mud, on grass, dry dirt, etc. as well as on steep hills. If it is really wet I stay off the steep hills. Does not dig but can leave lug prints if the grass is a little bare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Do u use wheel weights as well?
No. Each rear tire of mine (with water) weighs 140 lbs. I'd like wheel weights but don't want to spend the money.

I wish I had gone with these a couple of years ago. They make a huge difference in traction. You really need to fill them with something though.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,353 Posts
You think it would tear up the lawn? I usually only mow when it's pretty dry, couple tight turns around trees. Mostly flat yard, just wanted a more aggressive tire for when winter comes. Never liked the idea of chains..
The most aggresive tire for winter operations are fluid loaded turfs with chains.

Any particular reason that you don't like chains?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I have heard they chew up asphalt driveways Pretty good, also they end up looking like crap when they start rusting. We have 7-8 Months winter here and the chains would see heavy use.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,353 Posts
<--- Note my location. Winters here are 4-6 months long normally and have been known to be as long as 7.5 months.

I have read many comments about chains chewing up asphalt driveways. Most of those comments are written by folks who live in areas where deep frost is not an issue and unfrozen asphalt is.

My next door neighbour has an asphalt driveway that I have kept clear, for the most part, for 20 years and he has contributed to that effort for the past 10 years. He inherited his father's 12 hp Roper with a snowthrower, chains, and wheel weights and has a wonderful time spinning his tires up and down the driveway. I used a MF1655 with loaded tires, chains, a FEL and a back blade. On a rare occassion, the tires spin. Neither of us has seen any signs of spinning the chains on that asphalt come spring, let alone any damage caused by such an event.

The Roper weighs somewhere around 550 lb without the thrower and with the weights and chains, your 318 will weigh over 1000 lb without a blower or blade and with loaded tires and chains, and my 1655 weighs over 1100 lb before adding 320 lb of calcium loading and 30 lb of chains to the tires. Since blowers, blades, and buckets are on the ground when maximum tractive effort is required, I discount their weight, and I didn't include the 400 lb of weight of the FEL structure on my 1655.

The chains on the 2wd 1655 contribute to it's superior traction over even a 4wd tractor of the same weight that doesn't wear chains. I know this for a fact since I own and have operated both for several years in winter snow conditions. Both of these tractors have pulled cars and trucks out of snow banks. Guess which one didn't spin its tires in the process.

The chains on my 1655 are installed once. When they come off (after about 800 hours of service), they're scrap. If you want them to be pretty, paint them when you remove them come spring.

If it's winter traction that you are after, weght comes first, and then chains. My winter rigs always get the tires loaded before they have to deal with even one snowflake, and then my 2wd tractors get chains. The lighter tractors also get wheel weights.

For summer traction, loaded turf tires will usually be all that is needed, unless you play in the mud. Then you need a lugged tire.

All of my tires in drive wheel service have turf type treads. Heavy lugged tires have no bite on hard snow packed streets and driveways, chains do. I don't care how pretty or ugly my traction aids are, so long as they supply traction. I don't want to have to get my tractor pulled out of a snowbank as I did once (in 37 years) when my 4wd with diff lock got stuck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thank you for the in depth right up. I appreciate it. I guess I can save my money a d instead of buying new rubber and invest in some chains and give them a shot. I can't say I have any issues during the summertime as my yard is basically flat except the ditch in the front of the house. Sometimes if its slick the tires can break free. Are chains readily available?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,353 Posts
Chains are usually available in many places. Dealers, CTC, Sears, TSC, and PAL are some in Canada. Finding the right size for your tires may have you checking several locations. You can also get them on line, if you're close to the border. Shipping and brokerage fees are a killer from the U.S.

Be sure to get 2 link chains. There is a cross chain attached to every second link of the side chains. Be prepared to spend some time tightening them up on the tire. Carefull working of the chains into the correct position pays dividends with the chains not beating up the fenderpan. When done right, you can't get your fingers under a cross chain and you won't need bungy chords to keep them in place.

Since I install my chains on tires that are slightly overfilled with fluid, I can't reduce the air pressure to make the tires smaller for installing the chains and then bring them back up to pressure for tightening. I value the weight gained from the liquid ballast too highly to waste it in that manner.

There is an inside and an outside to chains. The outside has all the sharp ends of the cross chain connectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Putting these chains on sounds like it will be a little pain the the butt not gonna lie. But if it makes a world of difference ill give it a go
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,353 Posts
The first time is a learning experience. After that, about a half hour to do it right. I think I did the ones on the 26x12-12's on my 1655 in about 20 minutes the last time I did them a few years ago.

They make a huge difference, especially if you have weight to back them up. Like I mentioned, 2wd with chains will outpull a 4wd of equal weight without chains on hard packed snow.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top