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We're all friends here
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13,842 Posts
Links are working now. Looking good.
 

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Make Better Mowers
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55 years ago I had the O gauge then 45 years ago went to HO. If I were to dabble with it again, I think I'd go N gauge since it take no room. I can see you've many dollars involved here! It's just too much fun.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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Discussion Starter #24
I can't see well on the pics the wheel arrangement, the brass one is Big Boy or Challenger?
It's a freelance 4-6-6-4
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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Discussion Starter #25

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Nice looking layouts; jdcrawler and k4dan (sounds like a ham call). If space is a problem mowergene, you can always go this route. Shown in Z scale, but it's also available in N scale, as well. Unfortunately... they're a little pricey.

 

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JD, Layout is looking real good.....run's nice too..does O-scale wire the same as HO ? I still have a lot of my HO stored away....
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
Starting on the third track loop.




Checking the clearance with a boxcar where the track runs in a curve over the bridge.
You can see in the background that I have extended this upper platform out to the side wall.
The sawmill is going to be set up in this area.




Finally starting to put in some turnout switches also.
The track will run to the right off the switch along the back wall for a storage track.
To the left, it will run over to where the sawmill is going to be.




I will also be putting in a turnout switch in the existing second track down on the main table.

 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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Discussion Starter #30
JD, Layout is looking real good.....run's nice too..does O-scale wire the same as HO ? I still have a lot of my HO stored away....
Yes it does .. they are both two rail and powered with DC electric current.
The three rail O-scale is wired different.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,530 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
The inside track is loop is finished and I found out quickly that the curves are too sharp for any of the locomotives with 8 drive wheels.
The ones with 4 or 6 drive wheels takes the curves just fine.

This 0-6-6-0 Garrett locomotive really works good for climbing the incline track.




It is the only articulated locomotive that I have that will handle the sharp curves.




I'm running it here at only half throttle and with the four cars, it is running about the same speed as it was in the video.
It handles the incline without slowing down very much at all and it only speeds up a little coming down the other side and slows back down to it's normal speed as it gets into the curve.
Overall, I'm pleased with the track design and with the performance of this locomotive on it.

 

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We're all friends here
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It's a shame you can't use the steamers on those curves. Now you'll have to find some shorties, or add to the layout. :p
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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Discussion Starter #33
My big brass 4-6-6-4 articulated quit working so I took it apart to see what the problem was.




Both sets of drive wheels are powered on this locomotive and a gear has worn down on the rear set of drive wheels.




That is a risk you take when you play with trains that are built from parts that are 70 to 80 years old.
I have a couple of containers of extra gears and I dumped the first one out on the workbench.
It was quickly clear that I have only two sizes of gears .... too big and too small .....




So I got out the other container of gears and there isn't anything in there that matches this gear.




I guess its time to get on ebay and start hunting for a gear with the right diameter and number of teeth.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
I have some broken turnout switches that I want to salvage and use on my layout.
The switch on the right is a good switch and the one on the left is the broken switch.
The rails are held down to the ties with small plastic tabs on each side of the bottom of the rail.
There are none of these plastic tabs on the inside of the rails where the switch rails mate up against the outer rails and only the last two ties on the end have these tabs to hold the rails in place.

This isn't a problem with the straight rail but the curved rail has tension on it and if those last two tabs brake off, the curved rail will sprung out of alignment.




Here you can see that the last few ties are all loose from the rail.




All of the tabs on the outside of the rails are still good so both rails are set back in place and a small screw is used fasten the inside of the rails back down.




This old set of trucks have the tallest flanges of any of the wheels used on my locomotives and cars so I use it to check the clearance.
I can see a small gap between the top of the screw heads and the edge of the flanges so the wheels will clear and I won't have to grind the screw heads down.




Whoever had these switches before, cut the electric switch machines off them so now the lever that moves the two switch rails is only held in place on the one side and the other side can wobble back and forth.




To correct this, I cut a piece of plastic to fit in between the two ties and mill a notch in it to fit over the switching lever.




Then I glue this piece in place in between the ties.
The switching lever fits into the notch and keeps in lined up properly.




This is how it looks from the top side.




I now have four left hand switches and two right hand switches that I can use as manual switches or hook a remote switch machine to them for operating them electrically.




I don't believe that this style of switch is made by Atlas any more but they still show up on ebay from time to time and they go for $20 to $30 each ( with electric switch machines and controller ).
So being able to salvage these six switches has saved me some money.
 

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Make Smoke, Boil Water!
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I just gotta ask... Is that the old Atlas brass rail?

And by way of being helpful, have you thought of Caboose Industries' Ground Throws? I have them on my HO scale layout, crews have to stop and throw the switch to the proper alignment before proceeding. Makes for a lot of stop/starts when working the industrial area!

Let me see if I can drop in a link and an image, here...
Caboose Industries Ground Throws on Amazon
 

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We're all friends here
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I also use ground throws for manual switches. They work very well. Nice repair job on those switches, Ray.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,530 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
I just gotta ask... Is that the old Atlas brass rail?

And by way of being helpful, have you thought of Caboose Industries' Ground Throws? I have them on my HO scale layout, crews have to stop and throw the switch to the proper alignment before proceeding. Makes for a lot of stop/starts when working the industrial area!
The rail is nickel silver but the fluorescent lighting throws the color off.

Somewhere in all of my stuff I have a bunch of those ground throws and I plan on using them when I find them.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,530 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
Now that I have the three main tracks all laid down and working properly, I'm starting to figure out where I want the buildings to go and how to run the track to the ones that need rail access.

I had hoped to have room for my turntable and a rail yard.
Unfortunately, there isn't room for either of those so I'm trying to make the best use of the space that I do have.

At the back of the layout, I have cut into the second main track and I'm going to put in a turnout switch and there will be two more switches coming off this first switch.
The straight thru track on the second switch will go under the bridge and around to a railroad maintenance area on the other side of the track that climbs up to the upper level.




This Orange Mountain Mill will sit in front of this first switch.




This is the only building that I'm using on my layout that I did not build myself.
It has a loading dock that is built on an angle and it will fit perfect along side the turnout switch.




The third switch will come off the turnout on the second switch and the straight track on it will go thru this coal tower.
This is where the coal is dropped from the bottom of the hopper cars and into the storage space under the coal tower.
There is a screw conveyor on the back side of this tower to bring the coal up into the top of the tower.

The turnout on the third switch will run over along side the coal tower so locomotives can pull up there and fill their coal tender with coal from the coal tower.




The track that runs thru the coal tower will continue down to the back side of the Rubber Stamp Factory so liquid rubber can be unloaded from tank cars and pumped up into the two storage tanks.
There is also a loading dock for loading or unloading rail cars.




The factory is mounted on a 2 inch thick base so I had to cut a hole in the table that it can sit down into.




The building has been removed from it's base to make it easier to work with.
With the base sitting down in the hole, the top of it is flush with the top of the table.




Over on the left side of the layout, that track that came straight off the second switch and under the bridge, will run around to this open frame overhead crane area.
This crane is for lifting the boiler off the chassis.

Then the chassis can be pulled back out and pushed around the crane and on into a machine shed for repairs ( I still have to build the machine shed ).

 
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