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Discussion Starter #1
A few years ago I picked up a home built splitter for short money only a few miles from my house. It has a large frame and a 10 hp Briggs engine. I haven't used it much, but already it is WAY better than an axe. It moves plenty fast enough but it doesn't seem to have the force I would like for bigger wood. I think it only has a single stage pump, which would explain why it has good speed but not enough pressure. I'm looking at the 2 stage pumps from Northern and Surplus center. I think the pumps around 16/4 gpm would be a good fit. The other issue is there is no filter. I was considering using a filter between the tank and the pump. Surplus has a 25 gmp rated suction line filter assembly with 1 1/4" npt fittings. I will need to adapt down to 1" NPT to plumb it, and then get a 1" hose barb to go to the pump. Is there any concern that by using 1" pipe I will reduce the flow capacity too much to keep up with the 16 gmp low stage of the pump? It has a decent size cylinder. From a quick look it appears to be 4" x 40"
Are there any other important factors that I should consider when choosing the pump and filter?
 

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......factors that I should consider when choosing the pump and filter .......
yup....don't use a suction filter :). Use a suction strainer if you must and a return filter. If a suction filter plugs with small crap, the pump will eventually be toast anyway as it'll cavitate. The strainer will keep large pieces out and won't plug like a filter would, the return filter will catch the small stuff.Your suction appears to be off the bottom of the tank an inch or so, IMHO you shouldn't have any problem going without a strainer.
The reason the suction filter is 1-1/4" is that all you have driving oil to the pump is atmospheric pressure, 14.7 psi± which isn't much so you'd want a big a line as possible and the reservoir higher than the pump if possible, which you'rs appears to be.
My 2 cents worth (1.25 cents Canadian :) ).................Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Do you have any tips to flush the cylinder? I would imagine the easiest way is to fully extend and compress it with the hoses open.
 

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Do you have any tips to flush the cylinder? I would imagine the easiest way is to fully extend and compress it with the hoses open.
That’s about as good as it gets.

Any (most) contamination remaining will then be filtered out by the new return filter before it can enter your new pump.
 

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yup....don't use a suction filter :). Use a suction strainer if you must and a return filter. If a suction filter plugs with small crap, the pump will eventually be toast anyway as it'll cavitate. The strainer will keep large pieces out and won't plug like a filter would, the return filter will catch the small stuff.Your suction appears to be off the bottom of the tank an inch or so, IMHO you shouldn't have any problem going without a strainer.
The reason the suction filter is 1-1/4" is that all you have driving oil to the pump is atmospheric pressure, 14.7 psi± which isn't much so you'd want a big a line as possible and the reservoir higher than the pump if possible, which you'rs appears to be.
My 2 cents worth (1.25 cents Canadian :) ).................Mike
Valid arguments can be made for installing the filter in the suction line between the reservoir or in the return line

A log splitter is about the simplest hydraulic system going, It consists of a reservoir, a pump, a valve, and a cylinder. Any failure that can result in large debris pieces suitable for the use of a strainer will result in a very noticeable lack of performance before it could possibly cause an issue even if there was only a filter to capture them. The greatest danger is actually from dirt and debris entering the reservoir when topping it up. For this reason, a filter installed between the reservoir and pump is preferred so that any dirt can be captured before it gets to the pump.

With the filter pre-filled and installed as close to the pump as possible, most hydraulic pumps can pull the fluid from up to 4' above the reservoir. Since they are positive displacement pumps, they do have considerable suction capability when there is sufficient fluid in them to provide proper sealing.

Minimum suction hose size for a flow of 16 gpm is 1.25". One inch schedule 40 pipe has an inside diameter of 1.05". Arguments could certainly be made for the 1" size pipe being adequate given the short distance between the reservoir and pump and the relative positions of the two components indicated in the pic.
 

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Do you have any tips to flush the cylinder? I would imagine the easiest way is to fully extend and compress it with the hoses open.
With the cylinder fully retracted, tie the valve handle in the position for extending the cylinder, crack the fitting at the base end, and pull the rod out. This will push the fluid back through the valve to the reservoir for draining without introducing more fluid to the cylinder.

If you can't pull the rod out by hand, tie the splitter head to a LT or GT and S-L-O-W-L-Y pull it.

With the cylinder now empty, check the fluid level immediately after cycling the cylinder once after filling the reservoir. Keep in mind that the cylinder will require over 2 gallons of fluid to extend it full stroke, or about 1.75 gallons to retract. How much fluid does the reservoir hold?

Don't forget to retighten the fitting!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Would l be crazy to just change the fluid and install the new pump without adding a filter?


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Would l be crazy to just change the fluid and install the new pump without adding a filter?


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Not really, considering the parts that might wear in the system, and the total hours of use in the time that you will own it. If you plan on production of several dozen face cords per season for sale, installing a filter is a good idea. If you only require it for a dozen or so face cords for your personal use per season, change the oil every 4-5 years and call it done.

A filter on a log splitter will extend the oil and filter change interval to every 1000 hours. That is a LOT of splitting, and you could probably get away with just changing the filter.
 
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