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trk26
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was given a motor today and I was just wondering if it was worth messing with.
Its a Wisconsin
Robin
model EY44W
spec# cs1411
MFG'D by Fugi heavy industries ltd tokyo japan
The end of the starter is missing (were the wires should hook up to), its prety clean considering. It dont look that old but locals I talk to wish me luck on finding parts. Am I going on a goose chase? I dont even know what horse power it is other than by the size it aperse to be 7-9 hp. Any thoughts or knowledge is welcome.:dogrun:
 

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1,766 Posts
I have a old Robin's 6 hp, was on a power washer. It sat outside for 2 years?
My boys needed a new engine for their go-cart, I got the water out of the gas tank, started on the first pull!!! Before that we used it on water to hydrogen testing, got it to run on water for 3 min.. Been running strong for 3 weeks now. Parts? Mine is the same desighn as the new Honda or DeWalt 3100 psi power washer, I would have no problems swapping parts. Hope this helps.
 

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Vet-Wrencher
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253 Posts
My thoughts on the majority of things made in japan isnt that great. You'll find out why. If you want a wisconsin engine then get you the TRUE made in U.S.A. teledine wisconsin engine.
 

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Castor Freak
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2,167 Posts
I have a wisconsin Robin that is made in japan, its a 4 horsepower 2-stroke and it runs great, great workmanship too. Only bad thing about Wisconsin engines I find are that parts are hard to find and expensive. Hey Big10, I think your getting Japan and China mixed up, i sure wouldn't buy any small engine from china and expect it to last.
 

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Vet-Wrencher
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253 Posts
I wouldnt buy anything from japan eaither...and expect it to LAST. Oh there are some good things from japan but that is a VERY short list.
 

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Castor Freak
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2,167 Posts
Well, this Wisconsin I have is a Robin, which makes it a Subaru motor, so it better last :ROF I agree with you on good old USA made products Big10, it explains why my 1932 briggs Y engine is still running today, but there are crappier things made then what Japan puts out.
 

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trk26
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks alot for the opions everyone. I'm still thinking of it myself also. I think I'll try looking into the honda like mouse said I stand a chance to borow a starter and see if the motor runs and go from there, maybe.
 

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185 Posts
Well i have a 1980s (?) wisconsin robin Ey27W, got it for free, and i can tell your parts are impossible to find. Mine needs a new coil and i cant find one anywhere at all.
 

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Certified Technician
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8,594 Posts
I had a Teledyne/Wisonsin Robin engine, 6.5hp, EY23 as I recall, it was such a good engine that no parts were available for it, and I ended up taking to the landfill with 110psi compression, perfect carb, and no spark. Looked for 3 years for a coil and points set..never found one.

The OLD wisconsin engines are nearly impossible to find parts for anymore as well, good engines if they run, boatanchors when they dont.

Robin Subaru engines are great for the money, Chain driven OHC on some models, quiet, smooth and efficient, lightweight and reliable.

However it is disturbing to read this thread, because it is apparent that many people are speaking out against Japanese products in favor of American products...

Im all for USA products, but the fact is that the Japanese remain on the cutting edge of Technology. They had breakerless ignitions first for 4 cycles, Electronic ignition for 2 strokes, Slant cylinder OHV, etc etc..

I mean, if I take a current Briggs Intek OHV 6.5hp engine and compare it to a Honda GX-200 6.5hp engine, it is plain to see that HOnda has done everything to make their engines last as long as possible. Standard Dual ball bearing crank, Aluminum cam with steel lobes and gear. hardened crank journals, smooth castings, sstandard low oil cutoff, metal fuel tank with dual layered base, standard water and debris seperator on carb, and integrated fuel cutoff..

Briggs offers sloppy castings, dual plain bushing supported crank, standard aluminum cylinder, plastic camshaft, plastic fuel tank, optional low oil cutoff, optional plastic inline fuel cutoff..that's about it...

There is a reason Japanese engines are used commercially, and preferred by professionals over briggs engines, tecumsehs, etc..

And before you scream Briggs Vanguard...those engines are made in Japan by Daihatsu for Briggs.
 

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MTF Junior Poster Esq.
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7,645 Posts
You trying to confuse us with Facts Red?

You speak the truth.

Wisconsin Robin engines are good engines. Parts availability is whatever you can find in your garage.

I did google up some parts once for one I had. Can't remember the outcome. don't have it anymore and I didn't buy parts.
 

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Certified Technician
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8,594 Posts
You trying to confuse us with Facts Red?

You speak the truth.

Wisconsin Robin engines are good engines. Parts availability is whatever you can find in your garage.

I did google up some parts once for one I had. Can't remember the outcome. don't have it anymore and I didn't buy parts.
We had a ditch witch with an older Wisconsin Robin engine on it up at work , in for repair...it wasnt too terribly old but the carb was NLA, and the only one we found that would fit costed over 160 bucks from Mikuni. I think he plucked that thing off and stuck on a GX-390 Honda..
 

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Vet-Wrencher
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253 Posts
Concerning the first in OHV in small engines, it was actually briggs. Starting in 1919. You didnt see an end to that ti'll the mid 30's were they went to the flat head design for a long time and then went back to OHV. Most think that is new to briggs. It's not. I dont know when Honda first came out but tecumseh had solid state in it's first stages in the 60's. And concerning wisconsin (not to be confues with the later *** wisconsin robin) which WAS one of the best engines you could buy, also the most heavy, parts are still available for them although most parts have to be found by eaither specialty shops or in NOS packages on the net. I should know becouse antique U.S. made stuff is my specialty. That problem is that the u.s. LETS japan have a leading edge over engines. You get a old briggs that's 40, 50, 60 years old, you'll see at one time they WERE a good engine. they arnt now becouse as with anything this day and age, it's all about money, not quality as it once was.
 

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MTF Junior Poster Esq.
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7,645 Posts
I have a prewar wisconsin straight 4 cylinder with overhead valves. If I could find a replacement for the broken rocker arms on the exhaust valves I might even get it to run. Don't know when the first OHV was made by them but it was further back than most people would think.
 

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Collector of many tractors
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15,240 Posts
I have a prewar wisconsin straight 4 cylinder with overhead valves. If I could find a replacement for the broken rocker arms on the exhaust valves I might even get it to run. Don't know when the first OHV was made by them but it was further back than most people would think.
Why not make them or find something you could modifie...
 

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20,000 +posts!
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20,939 Posts
I'd put a car coil and a battery on those motors with dead coils and use them!..

ABC,I bet Kbeitz could cast you some rockers!..:D I've seen his starter pulleys he made, they came out great!..
 

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MTF Junior Poster Esq.
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7,645 Posts
I'd put a car coil and a battery on those motors with dead coils and use them!..

Show me some points and its a deal.

I'll advertise for them first, There are some people talking about them from time to time on that smokestack site, parting a couple out.
 

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Certified Technician
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8,594 Posts
Concerning the first in OHV in small engines, it was actually briggs. Starting in 1919. You didnt see an end to that ti'll the mid 30's were they went to the flat head design for a long time and then went back to OHV. Most think that is new to briggs. It's not. I dont know when Honda first came out but tecumseh had solid state in it's first stages in the 60's. And concerning wisconsin (not to be confues with the later *** wisconsin robin) which WAS one of the best engines you could buy, also the most heavy, parts are still available for them although most parts have to be found by eaither specialty shops or in NOS packages on the net. I should know becouse antique U.S. made stuff is my specialty. That problem is that the u.s. LETS japan have a leading edge over engines. You get a old briggs that's 40, 50, 60 years old, you'll see at one time they WERE a good engine. they arnt now becouse as with anything this day and age, it's all about money, not quality as it once was.
Which is why I said Honda was the first to offer a Slant Cylinder OHV engine, the GX line. PRior to that, HOnda offered their G line of flatheads, which oddly enough laid waste to all briggs offerings.

Prior to the GX engines of I think the early 80's, your OHV small engines were esentially a flathead block modded to accept an OHV head. For instance the OH180 Tecumseh, and the Kohler K-361. With the exception of some oddball briggs...
 
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