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Winter Service or Spring?

1490 Views 17 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  robhay2
So with winter on us, for those of you who generally do not use your JD during the winter months do you do a full service before putting up for the winter or wait and do it in the spring?
What is your preference?

I am thinking to top off the tank and do a greasing but otherwise leave oil/fluid/filter changes for spring.
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I do not like leaving old oil in the crankcase over the winter.

The accumulated acids and hydrocarbons in the oil do the engine internals no good.

I change the oil and filter before storing any 4 stroke engine
I do not like leaving old oil in the crankcase over the winter.

The accumulated acids and hydrocarbons in the oil do the engine internals no good.

I change the oil and filter before storing any 4 stroke engine
Good point.
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On my X720 I change oil , remove deck, sharpen blades and clean it. Lube tractor drive shaft, Come spring I’ll lube the rest of tractor and deck, install deck, Check tire psi and start cutting. I will run tractor every 2-3 weeks during winter. The X595 will be on snow duty all winter and gets a spring oil change


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Just found that the service kit for my X585 was discounted on Green farm parts even cheaper than ebay along with free shipping!! Score!!
I use my tractor to move snow in winter. But I have already taken the deck off washed it scraped and painted under it where the paint has come off. I sharpen the blades and greased it all ready for next spring. Because I use my tractor in winter I have changed the oil to 0w20 for the winter and in the spring I'll change the oil to 10w40.
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I have my tractor serviced at the end of summer with changing to mulching blades and beginning of spring service changing to cutting blades.I do leaf clean ups on thru the winter months.
For vehicles and equipment that get stored over winter I usually like to do the oil change and stuff in the fall. As mentioned above, I think it is slightly better to have it sit with fresh oil instead of dirty. But overall it is probably a pretty minor thing. For me, the other, bigger, benefit is that it is just ready to start using when the weather warms up (usually motorcycles for me).

Rob
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I do not like leaving old oil in the crankcase over the winter.

The accumulated acids and hydrocarbons in the oil do the engine internals no good.

I change the oil and filter before storing any 4 stroke engine
I was brought up with this philosophy and lived by it for years. However, after rebuilding several badly neglected engines over the years, I have yet to open one up and find any corrosion issues inside of any of them.

Now I change the oil when it's due or if I need to change the weight for the season. With that said, I usually won't let a low use engine, such as my pressure washer, go more than a year without a change. No real science behind it but it's worked well for me over the years.
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I used to work on old British cars when I had a repair shop.

I have seen bearings etched and pitted from old oil sitting in the crankcase of stored vehicles.

Yes this is an extreme example but it does happen, I figure why risk it? The oil needs to be changed anyway.

Less to do for spring commissioning.
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I used to work on old British cars when I had a repair shop.

I have seen bearings etched and pitted from old oil sitting in the crankcase of stored vehicles.

Yes this is an extreme example but it does happen, I figure why risk it? The oil needs to be changed anyway.

Less to do for spring commissioning.
I agree that it's cheap insurance however if your within service intervals, any acids should have been neutralized by the oil's additive package.

If I am due a service or near a service interval, I would most definitely change it before putting it away.

Anyway, if you want to err on the side of caution, change it regardless of how many hours since the last change. To your point, why risk it?
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+1 for changing oil before putting the machine away for the winter if it's not going to be used for snow. If you have to change it either way, I don't see any reason to let dirty oil sit in the machine for four months.
Thanks for all of the opinion. Great thoughts.

Service kit is on the way and I'll get my local guy to help me out with it. I trust him and much cheaper and quicker than Deere.
I prefer to change the ZTR oil in the fall, but sometimes I'm mowing and it's starting to snow so it gets tucked in the shed until spring or a warm winter day following a few dry days, where I have daylight and free time. No basically not until spring, lol.

The blades I swap/sharpen twice per year. Once is in the fall before leaf pickup time. Hi-lifts go on then. Then, in the later spring after they've mowed some sticks and rocks that crawled up through winter, I swap with gator blades until leaf season again.

The CUT used for snow duty gets oil changed every 30 hours or so year round. Also new coolant annually (the manual recommends this for some reason). Greased as needed, usually about 3 times per year in loader joints, maybe once everywhere else, preferably in the fall.
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I don't change oil seasonally, but rather by hours. No wintertime usage here in Tennessee, but I do a start-up ever 2 - 3 weeks for the batteries sake. Other maintenance as needed.
Really, service intervals I would have guessed most are like me. I change my oil twice a year regardless of how many hours I put about 80 hours a year on. I use 2 different oil weights for summer and winter and I know its overkill. But no one ever said to me your changing your oil too often. I keep my tractors 20 years or so and take good care of them and most have brought a good return when I sell them. My tractor I have now will outlive me so it's my last one.
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When I had a unit that would sit all winter, I fully serviced it (fluids, filters, sharp blades, grease, etc.) before parking it. Once it was parked I put the battery maintainer on it, since randomly starting the engine in the winter without running it up to full operation temperature does more harm than good. Once I was ready to mow the tire pressure gets checked, I fire it up and mow.
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when i had a unit that would sit all winter, i fully serviced it (fluids, filters, sharp blades, grease, etc.) before parking it. Once it was parked i put the battery maintainer on it, since randomly starting the engine in the winter without running it up to full operation temperature does more harm than good. Once i was ready to mow the tire pressure gets checked, i fire it up and mow.
+1
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