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I can't be the only guy reading this thread who is just blown away by your skills....good luck with it....very nice work
On this subject it is not just the stuff JD crawler makes it is the other stuff in the back ground.
I was looking for an idea for a block setup that is easy and light, he just showed us one.
I repaired a post on my shed with about 10% of the effort I was about to put on it because of a repair I saw him do.
Look at this when you get time I still look at it ever so often and find new ideas.

https://www.mytractorforum.com/119-home-made-tractors-implements-accessories/142914-building-my-tractor-finished.html
The one about putting the Cummings engine in a 58 Chevy he did was unreal.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #62
Thank you guys.
I always appreciate the comments from all of you and it is nice to know that I have been able to help someone else with a problem along the way.
 

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Master Cranker!!!
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15,036 Posts
Watching, learning and enjoying as always, Ray. Thanks for inviting us along.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #64
The frame joints are welded on the inside of the frame and then I started grinding the welds down on the outside.




All of the welds on the outside of the frame are ground down.




The bare metal areas are primed.




I made up screw adjusters so I can move the axle under the frame without having to try and push or pull it by hand.
These adjusting screws are made from 3/8 carriage bolts and I cut the heads down to form a cone on the end of them.




The head of the adjusting screws fit into the counter bore holes that I drilled into the ends of the mounting brackets on the axle.
This will keep the head of the adjusters from slipping off of the ends of the mounting brackets.




The axle is picked back up with the A-frame.




Then the A-frame is slid forward and the axle is lowered down onto the frame.




The axle is bolted in place and the adjusting screws are tighten down.
These adjusting screws will also help keep the axle from moving out of position later on.




Time to pick the whole thing up and remove the block stands.




The frame is flipped over so it is now on top of the axle.
It is time to start working on the front axle.

 

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Parts collector
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2,970 Posts
awesome!
 

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We're all friends here
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13,833 Posts
This is a man who can turn a hunk of metal into a work of art. :thThumbsU:thThumbsU
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #67
Most of lath work that I need to do can be taken care of on my small South Bend lathe.
Sometimes though, I run into something that I just can't put up on my small lathe.

The front wheels have a boss with a hole thru it, cast into one of the spokes.
There is also a flange with a matching boss in between the wheel and the hubcap.
On the right wheel, these two bosses match up so the holes are aligned.




On the left wheel, these two bosses are not aligned with each other ( as you can see in this photo of me removing the wheel from the axle shaft ).
I tried heating up the hub to try and loosen this flange boss and turn it to align with boss in the spoke but it will not budge.




There is no way that I'm going to put this tractor together with the front wheels being so mismatched, so the only thing to do is to put them up on a lathe and turn the flange down so the hubcap can fit over the flange.
Fortunately, my son has this big lathe in the back of his garage.




These wheels measure 17 inches to the outside and they fit on the lathe with about 3/4 inch clearance.




I'm turning down the outside diameter of the flange and also taking about 5/8 inch off the face of the hub.




Here is how one of the wheels look when I have finished machining it.




Now the hubcap fits nicely over the end and hides the flange area.

 

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Parts collector
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:tango_face_surprise
 

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Man oh man I am impressed! I wish I had half the skill you have or even the time. Work always seems to get in the way. LoL
 

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Wow, seeing that wheel on the lathe makes me wonder how true it is.

Did you check it for roundness, run in, run out.

Amazing to see that wheel spinning that fast.

Again, impressive work.

CCMoe
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #71
The weather here has been in the 50's off and on so I have been able to spend some time over the last few weeks working on the tractor.
Photobucket has finely got their site back up and working again so I can now start posting again. .................

Next on the list of things to do was working on the front axle.
Like everything else on this tractor, I had to use the hot wrench to take it apart.






The steering arms have been welded to the top of the axles.




I set the axles up in the mill to cut this weld off.




I mill them down to where the end mill is just starting to cut into the steering arm.




What weld that is left is thin enough that it is easy to knock the axles loose from the steering arms.




As you can see here, the front axle bar is bent out of shape.




I work on straightening the upper bar first.




With that straightened out, you can see that angle on the side down bars need some work.




So I use a steel block to correct the angle.
NOTE: if you do this on a press, make sure that you don't stand in front of it because this can very easily slip out and go flying.



Now the axle bar looks better.




One side of the down bars is twisted off from the other side.




I used the press to hold one side bar down while I put a long piece of steel over the other side bar and pushed down on it to straighten it out.




Now the two side down bars line up pretty good.




Both of the axle pivot mounts were bent out of shape a little so I used the press again to get them back into shape.




All of the front axle parts were them sand blasted and primed.






Once the primer was dried, the parts were re-assembled.

 

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Thought maybe you had pushed it off into a shed somewhere and were waiting till spring. Good to see progress is still being made. Looks like I need to get some square bar for the press. Never thought about squaring corners that way.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #74
I bore out a piece of round steel and put in brass bushings to make the pivot mount for the front axle.




The front of the frame is then cut out.




And the pivot mount is welded in place.




The wheels were mounted on the spindles and the axle assembly is mounted to the frame.
... Note ... the two lower bolts holding holding the spindle mounts to the axle bar are longer then the two upper bolts.
The radius rods will fasted to these longer bolts.






These are the radius rods that keep the front axle from moving backward or forward.
Obviously, they need a little work.




They were straightened by pressing them in between two flat steel bars.
I kept rotating them around as I operated the press until they were straight.




Then they were sand blasted and primed.




To make it easier to put these radius rods on, I picked the front of the frame up and turned it over.




With the frame now upside down, I put a pair of screw jacks under the axle to keep it from rocking from side to side.




Whoever originally converted this walk behind tractor to a riding tractor had the radius rods mounted on the two longer bolts with the nuts tightened down on them.
This did not allow the front of the radius rods to pivot.
With them being bent like they were, I'm guessing there was enough flexing in the rods that it didn't matter that much if the front ends were fastened down tight.

To correct that problem, I drilled the mounting hole in the front of the radius rods to a larger size.
Then I got longer nuts and machined a boss on them.




The front end of the radius rods can now pivot on the nuts with the nuts fastened down tight to the axle.




The other end of the radius rods have an Ford Model - A, adjustable ball and socket style tie rod end.
In my junk I found a pair of angle mounts off something that will work well to mounting the back end of these radius rods.
I put them up in the mill and bored a 1-1/8 inch hole in them.




I had already turned the back of the tie rod balls to a 1-1/8 inch diameter.




The tie rod ball is fit into the hole in the bracket and clamped in the vice.




Then it is welded in place.




Here is how the brackets look from the front side.




The radius rods are fastened to the front axle and the rear mounting brackets are welded to the underside of the frame.




The frame is then picked back up and turned back over on its wheels.

 

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Looking good jdcrawler,

I'm beginning to believe you could make chicken salad out of chicken %^&*(.

The wood floor of your shop has to be easier on you than concrete.

CCMoe
 

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Looking great!! To my eye from the pictures it almost looks like that front axle beam could use some sort of a gusset, or struts to stiffen up that U.
I was just thinking the same thing, like a piece of tubing ran across from side to side between the 2 mounting bolts. Would help to keep it from spreading apart when there is weight on the front.
 

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close enuff works for me
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2,970 Posts
jd crawler... your skills are amazing......you have been doing so much, with so little ,for so long ,,,,,,, you are now qualified to do anything with nothing.
 
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