My Tractor Forum banner

41 - 60 of 96 Posts

·
Lindeman crawler fan
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #41
The impact socket is put on the lathe and turned down to where the jaw coupler fits onto it.




I got a little ahead of myself here ... the end of the socket needs to be sealed off so the transmission oil can't come out of it and I should have done that before I turned the outside down.

The 3/4 square hole is blocked off with a piece of metal pressed into it.




And the end is brazed up.




The socket is then clamped in the mill vice and the keyway is milled into it.




The key is a tight fit and is set down into the groove with a light tapping with a hammer.




The socket now fits smoothly into the jaw coupler.




Finally the finished socket is installed onto the input shaft of the transmission.
It is held in place by a 1/4 inch allenhead bolt.




With this socket adapter, the jaw coupler will now fit on the input shaft of the transmission.
There is an end cap that bolts onto the transmission but I have to do some more modifications before that can be bolted on.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
965 Posts
jdcrawler,

Looking good and still impressed with your ingenuity.

I think the coupler is called a "Lovejoy".

Enjoying your progress.

I drove by some old machinery the other day and thought of this post.

CCMoe
 

·
Parts collector
Joined
·
2,970 Posts

·
Lindeman crawler fan
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #44 (Edited)
Yes .. they are most commonly known as " Lovejoy " couplers.

However .. Lovejoy is a brand name used by the Timken bearing company for this type of coupler that they make.
This type of coupler is a known as a L-Jaw coupler .. or .. Jaw coupler.
They are also called " Spider couplers " by some people.

This coupler that I'm using is not a Lovejoy brand coupler, it was manufactured for the RuggedMade products company in Massachusetts.
 

·
Parts collector
Joined
·
2,970 Posts
Yes .. they are most commonly known as " Lovejoy " couplers.

However .. Lovejoy is a brand name used by the Timken bearing company for this type of coupler that they make.
This type of coupler is a known as a L-Jaw coupler .. or .. Jaw coupler.
They are also called " Spider couplers " by some people.

This coupler that I'm using is not a Lovejoy brand coupler, it was manufactured for the RuggedMade products company in Massachusetts.
Well we "simple folk" call ALL off road all terrain fork lifts "petibones" and all those couplers Love-joys. :tango_face_devil:
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,839 Posts
I can't be the only guy reading this thread who is just blown away by your skills....good luck with it....very nice work
 

·
Parts collector
Joined
·
2,970 Posts
:thThumbsU

I can't be the only guy reading this thread who is just blown away by your skills....good luck with it....very nice work
Nope you are not!
 

·
Lindeman crawler fan
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
This flange bolts onto the input end of the transmission.




Turning it over, there is a thick washer inside it.




Under the thick washer is a fiber grease seal.
It looks to me that this was to seal against the outside housing of an enclosed driveshaft and not against the spinning driveshaft itself.




I need to come up with a way to seal against the rotating input shaft.
I found an oil seal that fits the diameter of the socket on the input shaft.




Right now, this socket is held onto the input shaft with an allenbolt with the bolt head and the lock nuts sticking out past the surface of the socket.
The oil seal is going to have to sit back far enough so that the back of the seal will be over the area where the allenbolt is.
I ground the head of the allenbolt down to where there is just a narrow part of the head that now fits into the groove on the socket.
Then I milled a flat spot on in the groove on the other side of the socket for clearance for a cotter pin.




As you can see, both ends of the allenbolt are now below the surface of the socket.




And there is now plenty of clearance for the back of the oil seal.




The old flange is not thick enough to put the oil seal right into it so I'm going to have to add some metal to it.
Here I'm cutting off some of this round stock.




The center hole in the flange is a machined hole but the counter bore on the back side is just cast into the flange and is not concentric with the center hole.
The flange is chucked up on the center hole and the counter bore is machined out until it runs concentric with the center bore.




Then the flange is turned around and held on the counter bore so I can machine the center hole larger.




Once the flange is to the size I want it, I put that piece of round stock in the lathe and machined it down to fit into the flange and squared up both faces.
Then I tapped the flange onto it and squared up the face of the flange while it was still on the lathe.




The flange is brazed to the round stock on the back side.




Here's how it looks from the front.




The flange is put back on the lathe and the center is machined out to the size and depth needed for the oil seal.




The oil seal is pressed into the flange and it is mounted onto the transmission.




Then the ( whatever ) coupler is installed.




I also put the sprocket and brake drum back on.
I found a plastic cap off a spray can that fit tightly over the center hub to make it look more finished.

 

·
Parts collector
Joined
·
2,970 Posts
:thThumbsU
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
965 Posts
Again, incredible work and imagination on making it work and look as it came that way.

I bet you see a lot of people scraching their heads, thinking, "so, that's what that part looks like" not knowing you had fabricated it.

Again, awesome work and skills.

CCMoe
 

·
Lindeman crawler fan
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #53
I just realized today that " Winter project " was probably not the best title for this posting.
The temperature is only suppose to be in the mid 40's today and it's a little chilly working out in the garage.
The only heat source that I have out in my garage is a salamander heater and that works alright for warming up the tool room a little because it is only 10 by 20 and is enclosed ( except for the open doorway going into the main garage ).
However, the main garage is open to the roof and the loft with open eves to let the heat out in the supper so it would be a waste of fuel to even try to heat that area.
Soooo .... as the days get colder, I will be inside working in my train room instead of out in the garage.

That said .. I did get some work done on the tractor today.



With the transmission finished, it's time to start working on the frame.
This is what's left of the old frame and it is going to the scrap yard.




The new frame is going to be made out of 1/4 inch thick square channel steel.




With the axle upside down, the two frame rails are blocked up so the wheels are off the ground and the axle is resting on the frame rails.
They are adjusted so they are square and parallel and then they are clamped on both ends so they will stay in that position.




The axle is then moved into position on the frame.




Just to double check the squareness of the axle, I measured from the inside of the frame out to the edge of the front of the wheel and also to the back of the wheel and the distance was different by about 3/8 inch.
I rotated the wheel and it moves in and out by 1/2 inch and the other wheel varies by about 3/4 inch.
Considering how old this tractor is and how much abuse it has obviously had, I don't think that is all that bad.




The axle is clamped in place and the mounting holes marked with a center punch.




Originally, the axle and the transmission were bolted solid to the frame.
Because the wheels are chain driven, I want to have a little adjustment between the axle and the transmission.

The frame rail is put up on the drill press and the first hole is drilled on the center punch mark.
Then another hole is drilled two inches from the first hole.
These are clearance holes so when I mill the slot, the center of the end mill doesn't have to cut any metal when I moved it down.




The frame rail is then put on the mill and the first cuts are made and the dial readings are marked down.
Starting with ' 0 ' on the dial at the left hole, 20 turns of the crank handle on the table to ' 0 ' reading is two inches of travel.
Because of the slack in the thread, I have to turn the dial past ' 0 ' to ' 3 ' on the dial when coming back to be in the same place where I started.




The first notch is finished.

 

·
Lindeman crawler fan
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #55
Will your next build project be a shop furnace/heater ?...
No .. I have no intention of insulating and heating my garage.
I specifically built it so it is open all along the eaves and with a door in the back wall of the loft that can be opened to help let the hot air out in the summer time.
It gets well into the 90's most of the summer and I want that heat to be able to get out of the garage easily.

The winters are mild enough this far south in Indiana that I can still work out there on most days at least in the afternoons and when it is too cold, I stay inside and work on my trains.
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
19,701 Posts
Oh,that must be nice,not having much cold or snow to deal with..but the heat I imagine can be brutal in the summer months..
Up here near Cape Cod its usually snowy & cold nearly 6 months of the year,or raw & rainy,if it ends up being an "above normal" winter as far as temperatures..
Makes doing any repairs unpleasant,even in a "heated" garage,so I try to get everything squared away by fall for the winter,but every year lately things haven't worked out that way..
 

·
Lindeman crawler fan
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #57 (Edited)
The axle is bolted to the frame rails and the whole thing it lifted up onto higher blocks so I can work on it without having to bend over all the time.




The two rails are squared up and the axle mounting bolts are tightened down while a piece of metal is clamped across the front to keep the rails in place.




The axle mounting bolts have a thick piece of metal over the slots that won't suck down into the slot over time like a regular washer would.




Two pieces of 3/4 steel are clamped to the frame rails for locating the piece that will go across the the back end of the rails.




With the square steel channel having rounded outside edges, I want to be able to keep that rounded edge blended in on the back piece.
The back piece of frame rail is cut 1/2 inch short on each end and it is clamped in place.
All the matching edges that will be welded have been ground off at roughly a 45 degree angle so when the two pieces are put together they form a ' V ' at the seam.




The pieces are welded on the inside of the frame and along the ' V ' on the outside of the frame.
The weld on the outside is then ground down flat so once the frame is finished it will look like one solid piece from the outside.




A piece of the bottom of the channel is cut to fit on the end of the back piece.




Two pieces of metal are clamped to the side of the frame rail for locating this end piece.




Then the end piece is slid into place.




And the end piece is welded on.




A narrow strip is cut from the steel channel and put on my small mill to cut the sides down at a 45 degree angle.




It is set in place on the corner and welded.
This will allow me to have nicely rounded edges and corners on the outside of the frame.

At this point it is getting difficult to see for welding the frame on the inside so just the outside welds will be done.
Once the frame is all welded up, I'll remove the axle so I can flop the frame around to do all the inside welding.
Once the inside welding is completed, I will grind down the outside welds to finish the frame off.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
965 Posts
jdcrawler,

Again, very detailed work, impressive.

Enjoying the ride.

CCMoe
 

·
Parts collector
Joined
·
2,970 Posts
Nice welds! :thThumbsU
 

·
Lindeman crawler fan
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #60
Marking and cutting the pieces for the front of the frame.




These two frame pieces are then fit into place.




They are clamped down and made sure that they are square to the frame rails.




And they are welded in.




Fit and weld on the end cap and the structure of the frame is completed.

 
41 - 60 of 96 Posts
Top