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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Full disclosure - It's taken me a week to build up the courage to author this post - because ... I broke Wile.
Here it comes ... :(

We've had this "Ice burg" stone smack dab in the middle of the entry to the trail that leads to our back property. You know the type; 8 or 10 inches protruding above the surface with God knows how much under :rolleyes:.
Wile has only 6 inches of clearance underneath so, I'm routinely steering one set of wheels directly over the ice burg because the trail isn't wide enough for me to completely avoid it.
"Bullump - Bullump" over that stone every time with a load of brush, wood, logs, stones etc ...
Well, a week ago to the day (Thursday 6/16) I decided that I'd had enuff of that Dad-Burned ice burg stone because it's been frost-heaving higher and higher the past 3 winters.
I slipped the Titan ripper into the receiver of Wile's Titan weight bracket, and then set about ripping around that ice burg, as trail space allowed.
It got bigger ... much bigger - as I suspected it may.
I shut Wile down and for the next 1/2 hour employed shovel and 4 foot pry bar to loosen more soil and roots.
(Jeezum Crow - How Big IS this stone ... grunt-huff-ooompf!)
Then, hop back on Wile sweat-soaked, and apply some direct prying on the stone with the ripper.
It jostled loose from it's bed.
"Ah-HA - I got you Sucka'!"

A bit more shovel work to create more space around the stone to attempt a roll-out with the bucket.

Back on Wile and employ the bucket with prying, curling, pushing.

One attempt, two attempt, three attempt - four ... five attempt, six attempt, seven attempt aaand ... the ice burg is teetering up and out on the very edge of the hole aaaaand ...... BANG!
Bucket instantly relaxes back toward the loader and the ice burg rolls right back into the hole 馃が
"Aaarrgh. What the Bleep just happened?!"
I shut down, climb down, and take a look.
Uh-oh ... :oops:

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THIS Is Definitely A Work Stoppage o_O

Drove Wile back down to the driveway and shut him down.
Walked back out to the trail, retrieved my hand tools and then put them away while I was grieving about repair, cost, STUPIDITY.
Went in the house, grabbed a cold drink and then sat on the porch to settle down and think.
Finished my iced tea and then moseyed back out to Wile to assess with a calmer, clearer perspective.

After close and patient inspection of the bucket and entire loader, what I calmly concluded was;
A cylinder ram that's busted off the knuckle, and center pin bracket has a broken weld.
Fixable :whistle:

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Drove the 4 miles to my dealer the next day. Walk up to the counter where the mechanic and service manager were peering at a computer screen and announced : "I broke Wile, aaand ... uhmmm, I don't think it's a warrantee issue. Wanna see some pictures?"

"Hey Ren. Yeah. We love pictures! Come 'round here and ... Wait ... you broke Wile? ... how'd you do that?"

Long story cut to chase - They can fix Wile. New cylinder, re-fab/re-weld center bracket. Re-paint and, better than new.
They were not nearly as glum as I was. They made it plain that they likely may have done exactly the same thing that I did and ... have seen much, much worse from much worse abuse.
Still, I can't shake the nagging notion that I should have been more patient and put a log behind that stone when I finally had it up out of the hole some, then finished it up and out with a good solid purchase and lift.
Instead, I made Wiled pry, curl and push. Pry, curl and push over and over ... until I pushed him too far.

Incidentally - I'm no geologist but I'd guesstimate that stone to be at least 1000 pounds.
I knew Wile couldn't lift it but, I was overconfident that he could "roll" it out of that hole so that we could roll it elsewhere.
He might have done so had I been smarter, and more patient.
I am smarter - I just wasn't patient :rolleyes:

And no, I don't feel that this was the result of a design or manufacture defect.
(See "Stupidity" above)

Renster
 

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Sorry man. We all get a little superhero charge from using hydraulics. No shame in it. Hold your head high.
 
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@Renster of N.H.
Is it OK with you if I use your pic in the welding thread to demo how I would repair that cylinder? I think it could be useful.
 

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Renster.....I know you love Wile.....I am sure he will be fine after the repairs....it does suck that you feel responsible....just don't push so hard next time...I am sure Wile will forgive you and go back to work :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just wire brush that clean, smear on some JB Weld on, squeeze the parts together and get back at it tomorrow! :)
Service manager suggested that maybe they could do a rebuild on the cylinder to save me $$.
I frowned and looked at Tyler the mechanic, who knew what I was thinking and said:
"I can see that you don't want a re-build. You want a new part, don't yeh Ren."
I replied "considering the force it must have taken to break that sucker and the weld, yer Dern right I do!"

Renster
 

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Sorry to hear about Wile. We all do things like that, but live and learn. It will cost a bit to get Wile back to work but could have been worse.

I have rocks like that in my yard and make them somewhat useful, like a strawberry patch.
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You didn't break it. It's a warranty item. The weld failed. The cylinder is probably rated for 3500 psi and your system relief is set where? Safety factors for hydraulic components are about triple their working rating so as to deal with pressure spikes due to impacts. It's a manufacturing defect, pure and simple. Insufficient weld penetration, judging by the pics.

Your dealer should have picked up on that. The tractor isn't heavy enough, or able to push hard enough, to break the weld if it was done properly at the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Our dealer hasn't physically seen the damage yet Bob, only pics on my crappy phone.
He'll get a better assessment when the cylinder comes in and they come pick up Wile (y)

Renster
 
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I think you're being too hard on yourself. It looks to me that it was just one of those things. It also looks like it was the weld that let go, not the rod. Don't worry, Wile will be fine.
I would do something with that iceburg once you get it out. Maybe display it somewhere as a tribute to Wile's tenacity and perseverance.
 

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Wouldn't it have been easier to "lower" the rock, ie, put some dirt fill over it?

And I agree with Bob, push the warranty thing.
 

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If you're not breaking parts, then you're not getting your moneys worth. :)

I've been breaking tractors for as long as I've owned tractors. You don't know the limits until you find 'em.
 

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Ren, I can just picture your face when you heard the snap. Going with a new cylinder is the right choice. I would agree with the warranty approach.
 

Kioti SCUT
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When I was clearing a spot for my shed, there was a "little" rock near the edge. It wasn't really in the way, and only protruded about 4 inches.

I could have left it alone, but was working with a fairly good size excavator so I went at it. It's now in the woods behind the shed, and it's bigger than my YT tractor.

There is no such thing as a "little" protruding rock in New England. Cal
 

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Sometimes it鈥檚 just easier to raise the ground around the rock.

i went after one a couple years back. I could see it sticking up about 3 or 4 inches just a few feet from the edge of the lawn, and could see about 12鈥 of the diameter. I gathered up a spade, snatch block,, ropes, axe for chopping roots if needed, and my Massey SCUT and went out there ready to single handedly move Mt. Everest. Unloaded everything and then got the idea to nudge the underground mountain with the loader. Yeah, 95% of my own personal Mt. St. Helen was above the ground. Very unceremoniously, I picked up the boulder with one hand, tossed it in the bucket, and dumped it on the power line right of way.
 

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Ren, I can just picture your face when you heard the snap. Going with a new cylinder is the right choice. I would agree with the warranty approach.
I understand your thought process and would normally agree. In this case, it's a matter of questionable factory quality control vs a welder who knows that there has been a problem and may be able to adjust the welding practice to compensate.

Six of one, half dozen of the other. Not my call, thank goodness.
 
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I agree that the failure was caused by a faulty weld on the bucket. You can see that the weld on the bracket has been bad for a while and has been putting added stress on your cylinder. It's an easy enough fix but should be covered by warranty in my opinion.

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Kioti SCUT
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Sometimes it鈥檚 just easier to raise the ground around the rock.

i went after one a couple years back. I could see it sticking up about 3 or 4 inches just a few feet from the edge of the lawn, and could see about 12鈥 of the diameter. I gathered up a spade, snatch block,, ropes, axe for chopping roots if needed, and my Massey SCUT and went out there ready to single handedly move Mt. Everest. Unloaded everything and then got the idea to nudge the underground mountain with the loader. Yeah, 95% of my own personal Mt. St. Helen was above the ground. Very unceremoniously, I picked up the boulder with one hand, tossed it in the bucket, and dumped it on the power line right of way.
I wish I could be that lucky.

My new method is a sledge hammer and safety glasses. It's more effort, but it works on the slightly protruding rocks. Most of mine are now flush with the lawn.

I just have to mark them with flags before using the core aerator. Or I, too, will have some broken equipment. Cal
 
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