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Ok guys I tried to find my old thread and didn't so I am creating another thread about my 24x41 metal garage leak. The company told me to pour the slab 1 ft longer and wider than the building size but after they put up the building it leaked. They were supposed to at least caulk it after the fact of course and they came out one eve almost dark to attempt to do it and I wouldn't let them because they were unprepared and I was sure they wasn't going to do a thorough job. I just decided to do it myself and recently used a very good caulk. I took my time and caulked it real good but it still has some leaks. I'm wondering how is the water still getting under the metal tubing? I applied the caulk evenly and pretty thick, or flush. Wondering if putting on another coat of caulking over that one and sort of taking my fingers and making sure it also overlaps the base of where the caulk now meets the concrete will make a difference in how that water is possibly now getting in?

Thoughts guys..............

If there is no way to get this fixed without having problems later on down the road I will take them to court and make them fix it other than caulking. Whatever they have to do to fix it the correct way without me having to worry about anything I will see to it through court if I have to. But in the meantime if can fix myself I would go ahead and do. Mainly if the caulking would work and maybe I just need to apply another coat and make sure I do something I maybe didn't do first time
 

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The concrete slab has to be the same size as your wall foot print,,,the siding has to hang down 1 inch lower than the walls,overlapping the concrete slab. This way the rain runs down the siding,and past the cement,and soaks into the ground .....The way your shed is built with the slab bigger than the building,there is no way to stop it from leaking ,,,sorry,,, ,just telling you the truth,,,have been working construction for 40 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The concrete slab has to be the same size as your wall foot print,,,the siding has to hang down 1 inch lower than the walls,overlapping the concrete slab. This way the rain runs down the siding,and past the cement,and soaks into the ground .....The way your shed is built with the slab bigger than the building,there is no way to stop it from leaking ,,,sorry,,, ,just telling you the truth,,,have been working construction for 40 years.
well I can think of some ways or at least one to make it stop but it's gona cost some money . I mean something can be made up , sort of like a gutter type thing to run alongside the building near the bottom and doesn't even have to be a totally closed in gutter im thinking.

Unless you are talking mainly along the lines of not costing too much and trying to caulk it. There has to be a way to combat this thing. I mean whats up with the caulk not working? Is it because the water is basically sitting there on a flat surface
 

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Do you have this issue?

http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=317097

My shed HAD a similar issue. The door goes down on a flat area of concrete.




I think I mentioned this before, but, anyway, I cut a 1/2" wide, 1/2" deep slot in the concrete right under where the door hits.

Several places, I cut similar slots to the edge of the concrete.

The slot catches ALL of the water now. :fing32:

The shop used to flood like the door was open, when there was a wind driven rain.

I cut the slot with a circular saw and a diamond blade, took about an hour.
 

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I agree with what Deereboy said, the siding should hang past the concrete. Now the next problem, you said that you didnt let them caulk the building. I understand your concerns with them showing up late in the day. You should have allowed them to come out and complete the caulking some other time. Now the issue you have (you said you might take them to court) is that you didnt let THEM finish their work, you finished it for them. You might have just killed any chance you had with a lawsuit.

You should always let the contractor try and make repairs/complete the work first. Document everything and take pictures as well.

Also pictures of your problem would be beneficial in helping to determine the cause.
 

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I like the slot in the concreate idea. But you might also look into something like sme skirting that angles from the wall to the edge of the floor. Or maybe gutters on the building would do the trick for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Do you have this issue?

http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=317097

My shed HAD a similar issue. The door goes down on a flat area of concrete.




I think I mentioned this before, but, anyway, I cut a 1/2" wide, 1/2" deep slot in the concrete right under where the door hits.

Several places, I cut similar slots to the edge of the concrete.

The slot catches ALL of the water now. :fing32:

The shop used to flood like the door was open, when there was a wind driven rain.

I cut the slot with a circular saw and a diamond blade, took about an hour.
I'm going to try and reply to all of you guys in one post as a little tied up at work. I didnt have time to read your link but yeah at the doors aint too bad but has an issue also. It is moreso on the sides though where it's flat. I will have a guy come by today and see what ideas he can come up with as I am handy but he is more handy lol

I did allow them to come back and fix it, fix it during the day time that is; not 8pm at night when its near dark, they were going to use a flashlight, and couldnt even find their caulking. Plus I'm sort of now convinced caulking would last a few yrs and would need to be redone anyway. So yeah that's why i want to get it done and be done with. I will explore my options for still being able to make them pay for whatever I have to pay someone else to fix it. I have documentation of the calls and letters I sent to them.

there are pics in that thread chaosracing pulled up the link to. My pc at work sucks and cant really do alot of things on it , or have much time to at the moment. Thanks guys

ON EDIT: THAT ISNT THE THREAD LOL.

THAT's the one from my mancave situation which is pretty much resolved but it should be entitled help with my garage leak, or something to that effect. I did try searching but through 9 pages might have overlooked it :(
 

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Problem is obvious.

Slab needs to be same size as the walls so that the siding over laps it by at least an inch.

I dont see anyway to fix that short of tearing it down and rebuilding it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Problem is obvious.

Slab needs to be same size as the walls so that the siding over laps it by at least an inch.

I dont see anyway to fix that short of tearing it down and rebuilding it.
what CADplans said should work because I've seen that concept of a drain to run the water off and take that water somewhere else. I have a neighbor who is a jack of all trades and has all kinds of buildings and projects/toys in his yard and he seems like a guy who can build/make/fix anythign lol. I will see what he suggests. I kind of feel like making these suckers tear it down and do it over , correctly. And cutting a drain about a half inch to an inch to run the water off

Then again, the guys that put the building up they put up what's standard for them to put up and I guess they have a standard and them putting the building up in a day or 2 is a solid building but not anything extra to prevent ANY leaks at all from what I have seen and such. So i will explore my options and i said all that to say I'm not even sure them doing it over would fix anything other than me making sure they do the building the size of the slab ( if they even have one that size they can do). Everything is structured as far as their sizes so that might not work. They have certain sizes that you can get. The most I can do , and I talked to a friend about getting their lawyer to look over my contract and all paperwork, is to get them to reimburse me for all of my work and troubles, and ofcourse that would be settled before any work is done so I will explore my options
 

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what CADplans said should work because I've seen that concept of a drain to run the water off and take that water somewhere else. I have a neighbor who is a jack of all trades and has all kinds of buildings and projects/toys in his yard and he seems like a guy who can build/make/fix anythign lol. I will see what he suggests. I kind of feel like making these suckers tear it down and do it over , correctly. And cutting a drain about a half inch to an inch to run the water

Sorry but that wont work. It might limit the amount of water that comes in but water will still come in.

Rain will hit the ground and splash up onto the siding, then it will run down the siding onto the concrete and then the water will run under the wall and into the structer.

You could caulk it but it wont last, you will be redoing it constantly.

When they said "pour the slab bigger than the walls", it should have been a red flag.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry but that wont work. It might limit the amount of water that comes in but water will still come in.

Rain will hit the ground and splash up onto the siding, then it will run down the siding onto the concrete and then the water will run under the wall and into the structer.

You could caulk it but it wont last, you will be redoing it constantly.

When they said "pour the slab bigger than the walls", it should have been a red flag.
yeah would have been had I had a little more knowledge as I do now. The thing is I have seen alot of buildings in my life that is sitting on a slab just as mine with it being wider than the actual building so I assumed that was the correct way and especially since I was told that by the guy selling the building. He was informed from Eagle Carport that that was the way it would be advisable to do in case they ran into any kind of problem with putting it up. Now that I think about it, running into any kind of problem would probably have meant something of their own wrong doing.

Also talked to the guy who did my concrete work as he has done alot of my work and has been doing others for yrs. He said he has seen alot of people do their buildings and he has been told also to do it the way mine was done with a ft wider and longer. He suggested to me today that roof cement or roof tar put on with gloves and worked in real good, a nice good thick amount with a little slope like should work. I would think that the roof tar would harden wayyyyyyyyy more than the caulk even though I used Eco bond, the black kind that is a very very good brand of caulk. I would just put the roof tar over that and actually make it nice and thick. With the caulk, I put a nice layer but it isnt like pertruding out or sloped or anythign but from what I did, I would think that would be sufficient but I'm sure with a nice thick glob of roof cement that should definitely make water ver very hard to get into.

The neighbor that I mentioned is the jack of all trades and builds and makes anything is coming over today to look at and I'm sure he will give me some excellent advise on fixing it the best way that it's going to last for very very long time. I'm sure caulking the end/corners of the building all the way down would help too since the corner trims arent that wide at least if it gets a blowing rain it would run along side the caulk and down to the base of cement. We might do a little drain for that to run off. I'm sure we will come up with something
 

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Just a thought here....

Would it be possible to pour a 4" x 4" concrete berm around the INSIDE of the walls? Just Use a 2x4 3-4" away from the walls and pour the berm tight to the walls? I don't know what prep work you might have to do to ensure it adheres to the existing slab though...
 

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Here is another option.

Rent a sheet metal brake, get a roll of coil stock and custom bend a counterflashing that goes over the concrete slab and under the siding with a leg going up about 1" or more. Resecure the siding and put some screws thru the counterflashing, then get some 1/4" zinc anchors and attach the flashing to the side of the slab (flashing should hang down at least 1" again.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Here is another option.

Rent a sheet metal brake, get a roll of coil stock and custom bend a counterflashing that goes over the concrete slab and under the siding with a leg going up about 1" or more. Resecure the siding and put some screws thru the counterflashing, then get some 1/4" zinc anchors and attach the flashing to the side of the slab (flashing should hang down at least 1" again.
thanks for all that replied.

actually my neighbor that I was talking about suggested the same thing, but also suggested that using the roofing tar or cement should work fine too. I will make sure I get a nice thick bead all the way down and will used gloves and manually put in on with my finger so it will look descent. I'm sure that will be a lot of bending though :(((
 

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All you need to do is bend it in the shape of a Z (bends would be about 90 degree) If you do it right, you will need minimal caulk. Do not use roof cement (tar) you will regret it later, especially if you have to remove it later.
 

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My shop has a piece, or should I say pieces, of 4" angle iron running around the exterior. The vertical leg is inside the wall with the horizontal leg protruding under the wall to the outside. The horizontal leg has, what I assume is, roof tar sealing it to the slab on the outside. I also have a rubber seal on the bottom of both the roll-up door and the side door. Unless we get some really serious, sideways blowing, hard enough to knock you over, rain, my shop stays dry (except for two small leaks from the roof which I haven't fixed yet). I don't know if it was installed before or after the shop was built, but I would think it would be possible to retrofit it.
 

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All you need to do is bend it in the shape of a Z (bends would be about 90 degree) If you do it right, you will need minimal caulk. Do not use roof cement (tar) you will regret it later, especially if you have to remove it later.
I agree with the tar comment, think of the smell on a hot day. It is OK on a roof, where there are few noses.

Maybe a :kens: will cover the smell! :dunno:
 
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