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I thinking of adding a whole house humidifier to cut down on the dust and hopefully improve overall inside air quality. The Mrs' allegies are such that we are either running the AC or heat so the heatpump removes alot of humidity from the air.
I'm looking for ideas suggestions.
I would think adding the water in the conditioned feed duct would be better than adding it to the return as it seems the HP would remove alot of the just added water. I could be wrong, thats why I'm asking :D

I've seen nice models with a way mounted humidistat near the thermostat where one can set the amount of humidity.

My ducts (both feed and return) are flex duct where they connect to the inside unit and I think that would definitely effect the type of humidifier to use.
Also, I would think that I'd want it to run all yr long, in AC & heat.

I have a dual fuel heatpump that uses natural gas as the aux heat.
Suggestions?
Dave
 

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you don't want to run it in the summer! Too much humidity is bad ie mold. The return duct is the proper place for mounting. Most of the controls are more like a shotgun rather than a rifle. Get an indoor digital gauge to get a real idea of the humidity.
My experience is from trying to stabilize summer/winter humidity for piano tunings.
I have yet to find a good humidifier. Tried about 5 in 30 years.
I have found that the console style with a foam wheel is the best except for refilling every few days. The electronic consoles are great for plants but bad for any furniture since they put out a mist. In out area with lime in the water, you will find lime buildup on electronic components like TVs.
 

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Dave, piano tuner is right about not using it in the summer. It probably wouldn't come on anyway when the humidity reaches 50 or higher. I have an April Aire unit mounted on the return duct. It was installed at the same time as the furnace and the control is attached to the duct as well. I use it when the humidity inside goes down below 40. I can monitor it with the indoor hygrometer in my weather station. Once it's turned it on I just leave the control near the max.

When the heat is on it really takes the humidity down. You can feel the difference and can actually set your thermostat a bit lower when using the humidifier. It is also much better for your sinuses. You will need a place to run the drain line, as water runs through the unit whenever it is on.

For me, it has been a worthwhile investment. :thThumbsU
 

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Discussion Starter #4
pianotuner, Al, godd info.
I've been researching and April Aire is the make that comes up most.

Al, what method does your hunidifier use to get the water into the return? Ive seen injectors, paddle wheel and a soaking wick. Liek eveything I'd like to be as maintenance free as possible. :D

Dave
 

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I had one installed last year and LOVE it.
Ours is a Skuttle brand, installed in the return, and I guess you would call it a wick?? It's just a solenoid valve tapped into hot water that allows the water to flow down a hard porous wick as the air flows through. We had to add a small pump to send the excess water to a nearby drain. Our humidistat is on the duct.

It made a big difference in breathing / sinus problems.
 

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April Aire uses a water panel. Water enters the top of the bracket and flows along a ridge, then gravity brings it down through the panel ( I guess it's still a wick). The suction from the furnace fan draws the moisture out of the panel and circulates it through the ducts.
Here is what it looks like:

It's made of metal with a coating of unknown material on it.
 

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I have a whole house humidifier on the furnace also.
I have the April Aire as well. It has worked excellent and it is a must have if you have asthma or allergies.

The correct installation of the bypass models is to install the unit itself in the supply and run it back to the return. This allows the warm air to blow through the water pad and get moist. It then goes into the return and gets circulated again. It is a bit of a short circuit, but the water pad it blocking most of the air. Usually there is a damper so you can close it for the summer season when only AC is used.

The water solenoid should be hooked up to the call for heat in the furnace so it does not turn on with the AC. The AC is taking out moisture and it would generally be counter productive to add in moisture when using the AC.
It is debated if it is better to use hot or cold water for the supply. I have mine hooked on cold water and it is working fine.

OP mentioned something about flex hoses connected to the furnace. April Aire (and others I am sure) do make a powered humidifier that does not have the bypass system. It just goes in on the supply side and a small fan blows air from the furnace room through the water pad and into the supply. That may be an option if you cannot tap into the returns.
 

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I thinking of adding a whole house humidifier to cut down on the dust and hopefully improve overall inside air quality. The Mrs' allegies are such that we are either running the AC or heat so the heatpump removes alot of humidity from the air.
I'm looking for ideas suggestions.
I would think adding the water in the conditioned feed duct would be better than adding it to the return as it seems the HP would remove alot of the just added water. I could be wrong, thats why I'm asking :D

I've seen nice models with a way mounted humidistat near the thermostat where one can set the amount of humidity.

My ducts (both feed and return) are flex duct where they connect to the inside unit and I think that would definitely effect the type of humidifier to use.
Also, I would think that I'd want it to run all yr long, in AC & heat.

I have a dual fuel heatpump that uses natural gas as the aux heat.
Suggestions?
Dave
The April Aire are a good unit. Being a heating dealer i think the drum type mounted on the return air with the bypass coming from the hot air. Damper it so you can turn the air flow off in the cooling season. The main trouble you have with any humidifier it the lime and minerals in the water in some areas.
In my area we have our own wells and hard water so they plug up a humidifier quit fast. Your humidistat control can mount on the return duct or wire it up by the thermostat. The only time you don't want to mount it on the return is when you have a electronic air cleaner. you never want to push warm humid air through a air cleaner, it can damage it . Make sure its wired so
it only runs when the blower is on and control is made. Paul
 

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I having been an HVAC contractor and have installed hundreds. The Skuddle is what I installed most and always put it on the R/A duct with a bypass to the S/A. I used to take the extra time and run the wires up to the stat and mount the humid-stat next to the thermostat hopefully hear a return. The best ones are the ones with a water solenoid where the water wicks down over metal media, avoid the sponge drum type. Also avoid installing them where you have fiberboard for duct-work because it will deteriorate and possibly grow mold.
Good day.
 
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