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My down presssure spring has the same effect, transfers more weight to the blade edge.

http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=204196&page=6

It increased the weight at the blade by some 45 lbs. It only requires the spring and a few washers, but it only works on hydraulic lift tractors.

The improvement was noticable both times I have used the blade since installing it.

Sheldon
 

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Float would not apply down pressure. You would have to push the blade down by not going all the way to float then let the control come back to neutral.
 

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I never bothered to add more weight. The more weight is added, the more friction there is between the blade and the ground. The more friction, the more likely the safety springs will permit it will fold under.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I never bothered to add more weight. The more weight is added, the more friction there is between the blade and the ground. The more friction, the more likely the safety springs will permit it will fold under.
My snowdozer chatters sometimes, especially in the straight-ahead position. I thought some weight might smooth that out. Any other suggestions?
 

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I plow with the lift in "float." Would float still apply down pressure?
If your dozer lift rod is set up correctly, there is no reason to plow in float because it will float anyway. When the plow is sitting on the ground, the slide on the lift rod should be in a postion that allows the blade to move up and down with the road surface contour.

The way my spring works this still happens. AND, you can lower the blade to a point where the spring is not engaged/loaded or you can lower the lift arm more which then applies the spring pressure.

Those of us with newer tractors with the electric over hydraulic lift have no "float" position - our lift arm is always "locked" in its last position.

I have my trip springs set as tight as the will go with the stock bolts. Both before or after the down pressure spring I have had no tripping do to the weight of the plowed snow, only when I hit something - including ice frozen to the surface.

This last snow we had has was more ice than snow. The down pressure system made the dozer much more effective at scraping the ice with no increase in blade tripping, in fact I would say the blade tripped less.

I plow an asphalt paved driveway that is about 7000 sq feet. I cannot speak about plowing other surfaces such as gravel. In my mind that woud require skids in any event. With skids the benifit of the down pressure spring may be lost or unimportant - but I'm not plowing on gravel and don't plan to.

Sheldon
 

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My snowdozer chatters sometimes, especially in the straight-ahead position. I thought some weight might smooth that out. Any other suggestions?
What kind of surface are you plowing? That sounds like your wear bar is not correctly adjusted or is worn out. I have worn out three in 16 years.

I adjust mine so that both the front and back of the wear bar are sitting on the road surface. I also find that the bolts get loose and require tightening or replacement every few years.

Sheldon
 

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My snowdozer chatters sometimes, especially in the straight-ahead position. I thought some weight might smooth that out. Any other suggestions?
Did you try changing the ground speed? Chatter is a problem that has no single guaranteed solution. I dropped down a gear to stop chatter when it occurred. Adding weight could make it better...or worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What kind of surface are you plowing? That sounds like your wear bar is not correctly adjusted or is worn out. I have worn out three in 16 years.

I adjust mine so that both the front and back of the wear bar are sitting on the road surface. I also find that the bolts get loose and require tightening or replacement every few years.

Sheldon
It's a concrete driveway. I have the trip dialed in perfectly I think, there are several joints in the driveway where the edge will catch and the blade trips just like I'd expect. Currently I have the wear bar adjusted so that the front edge and the flat portion at the rear both rest on the ground.

It only chatters in the straight-ahead position. I also believe I have too much slop in the axle brackets as the whole unit can swing side-to-side a couple inches. Maybe thicker hair-pin cotters would fix.

I usually plow in 3H, though with the added wheel weights, 2H is just as effective now. The major drawback with 2H is that backing up becomes a chore unless I jockey with the gears.
 

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I plow with the lift in "float." Would float still apply down pressure?
I believe the "float" position is a feature that is really only necessary for operating the lift hitch with a rear tiller or the center mount grader blade.

Like Sheldon said, the lift rod on the mower decks and snow blades floats automatically. Even running a front attachment you can't apply down pressure because of the sleeve on the lift arm.

Tom
 

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I don't know that you can do much about the play in the factory axle brackets, but I do think there is room for improvement there. I also have some "wear" in my pivot/angle mechanism which has added some slop, even after some repairs. But it does not seem to make a real big difference.

Sounds like you have the wear bar adjusted right. I plow in 3H or 4H all the time, never had any problems. I seldom go down to any lower gear, never saw any advantage to it. The snow rolls off the blade much nicer with a little speed, and even when working real deep snow 3H has always been slow enough.

Rather than use a lower gear, in some situations I'm not afraid to feather the clutch a little or cut the throttle back a little. Dispite the opinions of some I have not worn out many clutches (only two forward linings in 16 years, even with teens cutting the grass) and my engine is governed at 3550 giving me some range there without loosing much power.

And while we are talking about snow plowing, one other big added benifit to the steering brakes has been no sliding sideways when stopping hard on a slippery surface. The trans brake would nearly turn you sideways if you stopped hard at a higher speed. So much better stopping the wheels and not the transmission. Stopping power in reverse is greatly improved as well.

Sheldon
 

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Pictures of my current project below. 40 lb weights up front and 80lb in the rear. Found the old gears for scrap price at a local scrap yard. Just need to bead blast the front, get some paint and then I can start on the rear. Final installation photos to follow. I think this will provide enough traction...
 

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Pictures of my current project below. 40 lb weights up front and 80lb in the rear. Found the old gears for scrap price at a local scrap yard. Just need to bead blast the front, get some paint and then I can start on the rear. Final installation photos to follow. I think this will provide enough traction...
Steve, in the third picture, am I seeing right? Is that a manual lift 812 with the blower on the front? How heavy is it to lift that thing?
 

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If your not going for a lot of down pressure solely to scrap ice etc I would look at putting a rubber edge on the plow it will solve your chattering problem . The blade will then glide over the cracks and joint gaps smoothly no down pressure needed in fact the rubber edge works best in float .
 

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Sounds like an issue with the wear edge adjustment being slightly too aggressive/vertical. I've always plowed my limestone driveway in 2H almost exclusively at an angle. [No interest in pushing limestone into the street.] I've been meaning to try a rubber wear edge to see if it displaces less limestone. My experience shopping for a replacement rubber flap for the stump grinder revealed how many different options/grades of rubber sheet there are out there (some pricey). Its almost not worth buying a sheet for this application. Some cheap horse stall material from TSC might be the way to go.
 

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What's with the heavy weights on the rider with a blower? You are using more power moving the weights than what is going to moving snow via the blower. Use a lower gear with just chains maybe weights rear wheels and all is well. Ran 432 with manual lift rear weights chains 38 blower no problems. Have some nice action photos 1993 .
 

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My original intention is for mowing on hills and to be able to steer while snow plowing. But I'm guessing Ill probably just leave them on there all year. Hoping to be able steer better by keeping the front end planted, I dont have any wheel brakes. I dont see any issues with not having enough power to turn them, I think Ill get what im looking for, more traction and stability for cheaper than I could purchase Gravely weights off Ebay. Not to mention its just fun to make stuff for the Gravely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
What's with the heavy weights on the rider with a blower? You are using more power moving the weights than what is going to moving snow via the blower. Use a lower gear with just chains maybe weights rear wheels and all is well. Ran 432 with manual lift rear weights chains 38 blower no problems. Have some nice action photos 1993 .
I had occasional traction problems with my 18G and blower until I added rear wheel weights. I had to clear an uneven driveway across the street from me and lifting the blower to clear frost-heaved sections lightened the rear enough that I lost traction.
 
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