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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a an EchoPAS225VP,everything is good on it but seems to struggle getting to the highest RPM. It'll do it for a few seconds then die down just a hair.
I used 87 octane with 10% Ethanol in it,can't help that,it's in all the gas around here. The only exception might be a BP that did not have a sticker saying it contained Ethanol,so I don't know about that one. I thought all gas stations had 10% Ethanol in the gas.

Anyway,would it be better to use 89 or 92 octane?
Would it hurt using the higher octane gas?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Hhmm,I just watched a video at the Echo website about fuel mixture,it said to use a minimum octane of 89. So,there might be my problem.
 

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On a stock engine, there isn't any need to run high octane. You'd only have to if you've done high-compression mods (shaved cylinder, pop-up piston, thinner base gasket).

It sounds too me like your carb is running a little rich. The stoppers should let you adjust it somewhat leaner.
 

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I think you will find that most manufacturers recommend 89 octane minimum.
If you use 87 octane, it may be 87 from the pump, but once you add the mix oil you loose a couple octane points, sitting in the can in your garage for a couple weeks will drop it down at least a couple more. So, what started as 87 may now be 84 or lower. So, starting out with 89 or even 93 will extend the shelf life of your gas.
Higher octane fuels burn slower, cooler and have a more even burn. Low octane can cause detonation and uneven burning in the cylinder, which in turn can shorten engine life due to piston damage. Using higher octane fuel can help keep your engine running better and longer.
 

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You've only put 30 minutes on it? Goodness, its not even broken in yet. I bet thats your whole problem.
 

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Yes. These engines need at least 2-3 tank fulls run through them before they really start to break in. My large PB-751 really came to life and t-response after the 1st full tank or so. Keep it at 1/2 throttle or so during break-in and try not to load the engine to much either. The reason Echo and other top manus recommend 89 or higher octane is for keeping the exhaust systems and cataylist style mufflers clean and operating properly through their warranty period. Echo has a decent Tech department, of which you should call and ask specific questions, or you can email them as well. I try to keep 89 in all my small engine cans, either mixed or straight fuel.
 

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A semi-retired senior cit
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Let it break in a bit. 89 is what you should use, I always run 87 in my stuff and never had a problem we got 10% as well in our gas, here in CT.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I looked in the manual and didn't see a section on how to break it in,it might be in there but I didn't see it.

I just know on my other trimmers I would rev it up to about 1/2 throttle for about 10 - 15 minutes and go with it. I'll take it easy for the next 2 tanks. When I bought my first Echo trimmer years ago, the guy said they would break it in and that's about what they did.

I have trimmed and used the edger for maybe 10 minutes max, but it didn't bog down or anything.

Now,what do I do with this mixed gas I'm not gonna use?
 

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I will never use any gas with ethanol in a small engine. For an extra 20 cents a season, just buy premium. Around here they are now labeling premium (Top Tier) for small engines, chainsaws and garden tractors right on the pump. :fing32:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I don't think we have any gas without ethanol in it,went to BP to get high octane gas and had a sigh saying gas may contain up to 10% Ethanol. Maybe it has it,maybe it don't.
 

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"I don't think we have any gas without ethanol in it,"

Ditto.

"On a stock engine, there isn't any need to run high octane."

Well I would have thought that too until the new Stihl I just got which specifies 89 or higher. Which brings up a point, IF that unit is new, it came with an owner's manual. IF it isn't new, you can likely download an owner's manual online, DO WHAT IT SAYS regardless of what any of us say.

Walt Conner
 

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It's for detergency and engine cleanliness to run the 89+. I recommend that anyone needing confirmation to call the tech dept of their engines manufacturer.
 

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I always run premium in my Echo stuff. They run better on it.
 

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I always run premium in my Echo stuff. They run better on it.
I always laugh at people who say an engine runs better with high octane gas than with regular, and then find out what engine it is, a weedeater or lawnmower! LOL It's probably just in your head, and I don't mean that as an insult. If you knew as much about gas as I do, you would chuckle too.

All octane has to do with is the anti-knock properties of the gas, it's ability to resist detonation. High octane gas is NOT cleaner, better, or anything else, it's simply got a few additives in it to help it resist detonation in high compression engines. Nothing more, nothing less. If you aren't in a corvette or souped up hot rod, I SERIOUSLY doubt you need anything but 87.

If your engine is running poorly on 87 octane, then it means your engine's timing is off a little bit. Since high octane gas resists detonation by "delaying" it, it basically burns a little bit slower than lower octane gas. This, in turn, advances the timing on your engine by making it burn later in the cycle. You could easily get the same better running engine if you simply retarded your timing a tad and used the faster burning 87 octane.

People who run premium in their cars actually get worse gas mileage than people who run 87. Since premium burns slower, the car's computer has to retard the timing to make it burn at the same time in the cycle. In doing so means the engine makes less power. Less power means the harder you have to push on the gas to get it to go. The harder you push, the more gas it burns, and that leads to poor fuel numbers. That's why I so highly recommend 87 gas in everything but the highest performance engines on the road today.

Why these little engines recommend 89 octane is anyone's guess. Put 89 in it, but don't think 93 or 92 or whatever is better. If your engine isn't knocking, going to a higher octane gas is simply a waste of money. Period.
 
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