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I've called up several utility trailer parts suppliers, Grainger, hydraulic shops and no one seems to:banghead3 know where to buy a dampening cylinder.

I would like to buy a tilt bed trailer from a private party, but the trouble is when I would drive the tractor on it, the bed comes slamming down and I want a hydraulic fluid filled or air cylinder toi weld on that would slow the ascent and descent of the bed.

Cripes, I see them on most heavy equipment trailers so I know there has to be a store that sels them somewhere.

Or maybe someone on here would know how to build one out of just an old hydraulic cylinder with some sort of restrictor valve in a hydraulic hose to slow the fluid rate between chambers of a 2 way cylinder??
 

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How about using a steering damper for a 4x4 truck??...they make big ones for tractor-trailer trucks too if you think one of those might not be big enough!..

Sounds like you need an industrial sized "door closer" cylinder,like doors on buildings have so they wont slam shut...you probably could use a hydraulic cylinder with bleed off restrictors somehow,but I'm not much of an expert with hydraulics..someone here will probably know....
 

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with practice you can learn to ease forward and slowly let the trailer down. same for backing off, you move at the proper speed and it will slowly tilt down. buddy of mine had a tilt bed that he got so used to driving on/off it he could stop and the weight of the tractor would hold the latch up just 1" off the frame or any other point between down and fully up.

any damper you put on would have to be strong enough to hold up the weight of the bed and then some, yet weak enough to allow you to tilt coming off and not slam the bed upwards.
 

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Depending on how big the trailer is you might be able to use a spring assisted shock absorber. I put one on a small trailer to take the "bang" out of loading and unloading and it worked well. I set the spring to where it would just cause the trailer to go to the tilted position when it was empty. By running the quad forward it overcame the springs force and the bed would slowly settle into travel position. Trailer was a 5' wide by 7' long bed. Wish I still had it but my nephew talked me out of it.

Mike
 

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I have one of those trailers (5x10) and I do as Davidg said....slow down and eliminate the loud noise and shock to the truck, trailer and everybody around. The only problem I have is when my tires start slipping on the slick wood on those dry dusty or grassy days and I have to go faster than I want just to make it up the bed. I need to add something to the wood bed to privide more grip for the tires but I'm not sure what thay would be.
 

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Or maybe someone on here would know how to build one out of just an old hydraulic cylinder with some sort of restrictor valve in a hydraulic hose to slow the fluid rate between chambers of a 2 way cylinder??
You can't connect the two ports of a double acting cylinder directly; you need to add some sort of reservoir. The reason is that, when the rod is retracting, it is taking up volume in the cylinder and the displaced oil must go somewhere. Your reservoir would need some air within it (but mounted to avoid air going into the cylinder) but shouldn't need a breather so long as enough airspace is present -- every time you halve the volume of the air you double its pressure, etc., and your reservoir needs to handle that pressure.

But yes, a hydraulic cylinder would work. What you're looking for is called an "orifice" to restrict the flow. Sizing the orifice would require details as to how big of a cylinder you are going to use. A single-acting cylinder would be simpler to plumb.
 

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I have one of those trailers (5x10) and I do as Davidg said....slow down and eliminate the loud noise and shock to the truck, trailer and everybody around. The only problem I have is when my tires start slipping on the slick wood on those dry dusty or grassy days and I have to go faster than I want just to make it up the bed. I need to add something to the wood bed to privide more grip for the tires but I'm not sure what thay would be.
I've tried screens, outdoor carpet and roughening the plank surface with minimal success. One of the worst ones was a deck coating that had some kind of traction grip in it.

What has worked the best so far is to have a small bucket of course sand in the tool box and spreading a little of it in the tires path. Inconvenient and another thing to remember to keep filled but it works.

Mike
 

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I know what you're saying, my dad installed one on a car hauler for the same reason, with the valve you turn it where you want it, and the bed comes down soft as can be.

I don't know what exactly he used, or where he got it, but I do know it wasn't a set part designed for that use. It was some sort of cylinder he had laying around, and he added the proper valve.
 

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You can't connect the two ports of a double acting cylinder directly; you need to add some sort of reservoir. The reason is that, when the rod is retracting, it is taking up volume in the cylinder and the displaced oil must go somewhere. Your reservoir would need some air within it (but mounted to avoid air going into the cylinder) but shouldn't need a breather so long as enough airspace is present -- every time you halve the volume of the air you double its pressure, etc., and your reservoir needs to handle that pressure.

But yes, a hydraulic cylinder would work. What you're looking for is called an "orifice" to restrict the flow. Sizing the orifice would require details as to how big of a cylinder you are going to use. A single-acting cylinder would be simpler to plumb.
No reservoir needed ...No air needed... Oil just moves from one end to the other... You can see them on electric band saws... Ball valve controls flow... Or you could buy a flow control valve...
 

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I have one of those trailers (5x10) and I do as Davidg said....slow down and eliminate the loud noise and shock to the truck, trailer and everybody around. The only problem I have is when my tires start slipping on the slick wood on those dry dusty or grassy days and I have to go faster than I want just to make it up the bed. I need to add something to the wood bed to privide more grip for the tires but I'm not sure what thay would be.
Anti skid paint
 

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No reservoir needed ...No air needed... Oil just moves from one end to the other... You can see them on electric band saws... Ball valve controls flow... Or you could buy a flow control valve...
Yes, but when the cylinder is extended it's filled with "X" amount of oil, and when it's retracted it would be filled with the same "X" amount of oil PLUS the rod. The cylinder has to contain some air (or be able to create vacuum) or it won't move.
 

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Yes, but when the cylinder is extended it's filled with "X" amount of oil, and when it's retracted it would be filled with the same "X" amount of oil PLUS the rod. The cylinder has to contain some air (or be able to create vacuum) or it won't move.
I agree w/ you. If there's no air space in that cyl. it can't move due to the displacement of the rod. I could see how it would work w/ an accumulator teed into the hose or the proper amount of air space in the rod end.
Mike
 
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