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In my experience it takes quite a lot of weight to balance out a loader.
 

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The Magnificent
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I don't see an outlandish amount of weight there. Looks like a 75lb starter with a 50lb on top. That's only 125lbs per wheel, and certainly within Deere's design limits.

When I run my little OR-Bilt loader, I have 65 lbs liquid filling, a 50lb wheel weight, and 6 suitcase weights on the rear. I run about the same profile for pushing with the blade.
 

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Oh, I think that is a shin breaker!
 

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Doesn't look like overkill to me. :fing32: Adam
 

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wheel weights are second in line to liquid filled tires as the best weight source because they are not a stress on the transaxle. You can't have enough weight when it comes to snow activity. Weight is equal or more important than tread pattern.

Definitely not overkill.

As for the front end loader ballast the rear weight is at a disadvantage compared to the loader because the loader weight is further from the fulcrum than the rear weight. The teeter-totter principle or in airplane terms Weight X Arm= Moment or 1 in the tail= 3 in the nose (reversed for a tractor)
 

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It's not overkill, but it may leave something to be desired in application if the snowblower is the same width as the rear tires as many are. A somewhat better idea is to put a set of 50 lb weights on the inside of the rim and a 75 lb set on the outside and load the tires with RimGuard instead of antifreeze leaving only the tire chains to chew up the edges of a cut.

A little more weight out back would be beneficial for both tasks.
 

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wheel weights are second in line to liquid filled tires as the best weight source because they are not a stress on the transaxle. You can't have enough weight when it comes to snow activity. Weight is equal or more important than tread pattern.

Definitely not overkill.

As for the front end loader ballast the rear weight is at a disadvantage compared to the loader because the loader weight is further from the fulcrum than the rear weight. The teeter-totter principle or in airplane terms Weight X Arm= Moment or 1 in the tail= 3 in the nose (reversed for a tractor)
Hmmm. On my tractor the centre of the bucket is 34" in front of the front axle. The rear axle is 52" behind the front axle. Advantage: Rear axle by 1.5:1. Any weight added to the 3PH carries over 2:1 advantage at the ends of the arms and even more advantage for the centre of mass of any implement back there.

250 lb of wheel weights will balance a 375 lb load half of the tractors wheelbase in front of the front axle with a minimal loss of traction.

Definitely not reversed for a tractor/FEL.

In winter operation, traction is always at a premium. Ditto for FEL work in any season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have these weights in the garage, I actually put them on the tractor once. I thought I had installed them wrong until I saw this picture. I took them off and just put on the outside ones. TUDOR, now that you mention it, they will stick out further than the blower. I think I will look into rimguard again. I hope to use enough weight to avoid using the tire chains.
 
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