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how "heavy duty" it is. And there are GT's that are "heavier duty" than other GT's

Consider this analogy:
A Lawn Tractor is a car. It moves 5 adults (1000lbs) every day... in comfort.
A GT is a truck. It moves 1000lbs too, but not 1000lbs of people... it will move 1000lbs of bricks, and rusty steel... and can tow another 6000lbs at the same time... and can do it on a dirt road or off-trail. All day long.

You load 1000lbs of bricks into a car, it will go. Hitch up a 6000lb trailer and go off-road, and you may be picking up pieces of frame and suspension that got torn off with the load while driving... and if you keep doing it every day for years - that car will be beat to crap, broken and probably dead in a very short time.

Now there are compact trucks (light duty GTs), and super-duty trucks (real GTs).

Also, Lawn Tractors made 30 years ago, are different than lawn tractors made today. Case in point: Deere 332: diesel, 850lbs of steel frame, hydraulics and other guts. And it's called a Lawn Tractor.
 

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Usually lawn tractor just does that....mows lawns.
Whereas a garden tractor will do a multitude of work, mowing, plowing, snow blowing, garden tilling etc......Ground engaging tasks are really hard on equipment, a garden tractor is better suited to this.
 

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What determines the difference? Where does the line of difference start?
With the transmission. Then the frame, steering components, and wheels have to be made stronger to handle the greater forces that can be applied.

An LT can handle the work of one or two men. A GT will outwork a half dozen men with the same (or less) engine horsepower as the LT.

Todays LTs can weigh as much as 600 lb, including the mowing deck. A GT will weigh at least 550 lb to over 1200 lb without the deck or any other accessories.

What we break down as LTs and GTs all fall into the general category of lawn tractors. An LT is great for mowing lawns, but not suitable for ground engaging implements, while a GT is suitable. Hence the "Garden" moniker.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
how "heavy duty" it is. And there are GT's that are "heavier duty" than other GT's

Consider this analogy:
A Lawn Tractor is a car. It moves 5 adults (1000lbs) every day... in comfort.
A GT is a truck. It moves 1000lbs too, but not 1000lbs of people... it will move 1000lbs of bricks, and rusty steel... and can tow another 6000lbs at the same time... and can do it on a dirt road or off-trail. All day long.

You load 1000lbs of bricks into a car, it will go. Hitch up a 6000lb trailer and go off-road, and you may be picking up pieces of frame and suspension that got torn off with the load while driving... and if you keep doing it every day for years - that car will be beat to crap, broken and probably dead in a very short time.

Now there are compact trucks (light duty GTs), and super-duty trucks (real GTs).

Also, Lawn Tractors made 30 years ago, are different than lawn tractors made today. Case in point: Deere 332: diesel, 850lbs of steel frame, hydraulics and other guts. And it's called a Lawn Tractor.
I would think all lawn tractors and GT's are cars. One and two passenger and 6. I would think a truck would be considered a SCUT. Just trying to determine the particular configuration that makes up and draws the line making the differences. They all have 4 tires, some have the same frames, some have the same engine size. Where is the fine line of difference? Is it only the transmission?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
With the transmission. Then the frame, steering components, and wheels have to be made stronger to handle the greater forces that can be applied.

An LT can handle the work of one or two men. A GT will outwork a half dozen men with the same (or less) engine horsepower as the LT.

Todays LTs can weigh as much as 600 lb, including the mowing deck. A GT will weigh at least 550 lb to over 1200 lb without the deck or any other accessories.

What we break down as LTs and GTs all fall into the general category of lawn tractors. An LT is great for mowing lawns, but not suitable for ground engaging implements, while a GT is suitable. Hence the "Garden" moniker.
So it sounds like the tranny is the main difference. Weight can overlap, tires can be the same, sometimes frames are the same, and same engines. So what tranny makes the difference between the LT and a GT?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
how "heavy duty" it is. And there are GT's that are "heavier duty" than other GT's

Consider this analogy:
A Lawn Tractor is a car. It moves 5 adults (1000lbs) every day... in comfort.
A GT is a truck. It moves 1000lbs too, but not 1000lbs of people... it will move 1000lbs of bricks, and rusty steel... and can tow another 6000lbs at the same time... and can do it on a dirt road or off-trail. All day long.

You load 1000lbs of bricks into a car, it will go. Hitch up a 6000lb trailer and go off-road, and you may be picking up pieces of frame and suspension that got torn off with the load while driving... and if you keep doing it every day for years - that car will be beat to crap, broken and probably dead in a very short time.

Now there are compact trucks (light duty GTs), and super-duty trucks (real GTs).

Also, Lawn Tractors made 30 years ago, are different than lawn tractors made today. Case in point: Deere 332: diesel, 850lbs of steel frame, hydraulics and other guts. And it's called a Lawn Tractor.
I see what you are saying here. It all gets bigger and stronger.
 

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So it sounds like the tranny is the main difference. Weight can overlap, tires can be the same, sometimes frames are the same, and same engines. So what tranny makes the difference between the LT and a GT?
Transmissions for sure are beefier on GTs.
Some GTs have same frames as an LT, but that is a mistake. Frames "should" be beefier too... If you hook up a tiller, or a harrow, or a 1000lb roller and start manouvering around with it - the forces of the attachment are carried by the frame to the transmission connection point. A strong transmission can overcome the load but bend the frame in the process.
Here is a link to a story about a craftsman GT that is a perfect example of that happening: https://www.mytractorforum.com/14-craftsman-sears-forum/1196482-broke-frame-gt6000.html

So you need a heavier frame. How heavy?... depends what you want to do... some GT's can handle a FEL... you need a really strong frame for that.

Weight is a function of how equipped the tractor is. Some LTs have big engines - adds weight - does (nearly) nothing for overall durability. Tires and wheels are same but GT tires are generally bigger - to carry bigger load.... and to "get the power to the ground".

Some of the bigger GTs and their bigger transmissions, offer rear PTO, or extra hydraulic circuits to operate other equipment you would attach to the tractor... basically the tranny has the ability to push more fluid and higher pressure, so the tractor offers it. Extra feature. Extra cost. Not available on smaller LT tractors.
 

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One way to tell right away if a machine is a LT or GT is the rear wheels... they are typically a bit larger on a GT ( as mentioned above ) and they bolt on as opposed to a "C' or "E" snap ring with a washer to hold them on to the tractor......
 

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So it sounds like the tranny is the main difference. Weight can overlap, tires can be the same, sometimes frames are the same, and same engines. So what tranny makes the difference between the LT and a GT?
The weight doesn't overlap. LTs include the deck and GTs don't. The decks weigh upwards of 75 lb. Likewise, GT tires are larger than LT tires. The larger GTs often use the same size front tires as the LTs have on the rear. The frames overlap with LTs only on the entry level GTs. Bigger transmissions require stronger frames.

For Tuff Tork, transmission models numbered below 60 are for LTs, eg K46, K58, although I think JD has used a K58 in its entry level GT. Model numbers above 60 are for GTs with the K92 being the top of the line.

Others for GTs are the Hydro Gear G700, BDU 21L, Eaton 11 and 12, and Sundstrand Series 15.
 

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One way to tell right away if a machine is a LT or GT is the rear wheels... they are typically a bit larger on a GT ( as mentioned above ) and they bolt on as opposed to a "C' or "E" snap ring with a washer to hold them on to the tractor......
That's not always the case either. Husqvarna sells an LGT2454 or something like that that has bolt on rear wheels but a light duty, non ground engaging K46 transaxle.
 

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Sounds like the a new Cub XT3 or a used Deere would be the best ones to consider to me.
the older Cubbys r better than the XT3..
 

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Used(!) to be a GT had a 3-point on hydraulics and an LT didn't. Only a few GTs with 3-points nowadays. I think Simplicity, Kubota and Deere.
Of course there's also the price, talking over 5k here.
For our 1.5 acres I went with a CC XT3, I wanted a 54" mowing deck, but something of an overkill - it's clumsy. Later this year when I start rolling the 3/4 acre we've fenced for the minis (horses) it'll start earning it's keep.
 

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I've noticed TractorData has a pretty good but not perfect definition of LT vs GT. They do call my old Wheelhorse 266H a GT although many consider it an LT. It had bolt on wheels and a K61.

Cub had several LTs with bolt on wheels (Lt1554) that looked like GTs. Best way to classify one is with a spec search on the tractor in question with focus on the transmission and its capabilities.
 

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Sounds like the a new Cub XT3 or a used Deere would be the best ones to consider to me.
What size is your property?..also is it flat or hilly? Do you intend to perform other chores with it ( A 3 point hitch on the back makes them quite universal....log splitters, roto tillers, a lot of stuff)...do you want to plow or blow snow?

Some older GTs in my opinion are better than some of the new stuff....and CC and JD are not necessarily the "best ones to consider"...an old Bolens or Allis Chalmers, CASE, MF, Simplicity...are all good machines...a good Garden Tractor, when properly maintained could last you the rest of your life
 

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Discussion Starter #19
the older Cubbys r better than the XT3..
A friend of mine wants to buy an X700 series. He has a 1995 1863 to sell. So it's 24 years old with probably at least 1,500-2,000 hours on it. That just seems like lots of hours to me to take over and go with. He has take excellent care of it and has had no problems. It is a tough one though.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
What size is your property?..also is it flat or hilly? Do you intend to perform other chores with it ( A 3 point hitch on the back makes them quite universal....log splitters, roto tillers, a lot of stuff)...do you want to plow or blow snow?

Some older GTs in my opinion are better than some of the new stuff....and CC and JD are not necessarily the "best ones to consider"...an old Bolens or Allis Chalmers, CASE, MF, Simplicity...are all good machines...a good Garden Tractor, when properly maintained could last you the rest of your life
I guess that's a good point but most have lots of hours if you think about it. Otherwise you would have to go with some of the top X series JD's. The older 400's, 500,s.
 
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