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It's a small 2 gallon. I can't find CFM or HP .... (it's a Campbell Hausfeld FP209501)
That little guy would be unlikely to make a 1/2" impact run for very long. A couple of impacts and it'd be out of air. I would not bet on it working. 1/2" impacts use 5-6 cfm of air and your compressor puts out .39.

 
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It's a small 2 gallon. I can't find CFM or HP .... (it's a Campbell Hausfeld FP209501)
I don't think the details of the compressor itself are terribly important, for brief impact gun use. All you need is pressure, and airflow. Which is primarily a function of the pressure setting on the regulator, and how restrictive your regulator and air hose are. If you have problems with insufficient torque, raise the pressure setting on the regulator, and use a shorter/larger diameter hose.

The small tank and low compressor CFM will mean that you will quickly deplete your air supply, and you'll need to wait for the compressor to build up pressure again. But once it's pressurized, you should be able to get brief spurts of impact use, I would think.

My first impact was the cheap electric Harbor Freight one, around 240 ft-lbs. It's bulky, heavy, and crude. It just goes, you can't slow it down to make it gentler or anything. So the item is kinda coming off, whether in 1 piece, or 2. At least for smaller fasteners.

But it's effective. It always took off what I asked. Sometimes in 2 pieces :)

I now also have a pneumatic one, which is lighter, smaller, more torque, and can work more gently. But firing up the compressor is a bit of a pain, and I can't use it everywhere.

The corded electric will definitely work for you, and requires nothing else, no other infrastructure. And an extension cord gives you longer reach than an air line.

A nice battery one sounds great. My battery one is a 1/4" impact driver, not a 1/2" impact gun, so it's weak. It's still handy for some things, but mine is somewhat limited. But a good battery one will be rather more expensive, vs a basic plug-in style, so you have to decide how much you want to spend, and what else you want to use it for.
 

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I don't think the details of the compressor itself are terribly important, for brief impact gun use. All you need is pressure, and airflow. Which is primarily a function of the pressure setting on the regulator, and how restrictive your regulator and air hose are. If you have problems with insufficient torque, raise the pressure setting on the regulator, and use a shorter/larger diameter hose.
The reason I said I didn't think it will work is based on my own observations with my larger compressor and psi with a 1/2" impact. I've had several instances of my 2HP/20gal compressor being just above its kick in pressure of 100psi.

Start trying to break spindle nuts loose and it won't move them, then the compressor kicks in. I have to wait for my pump to build up to 120psi to break them loose.

His compressor is maxed out at 100psi and he has a tiny volume 2gal tank. I fear it will not have enough oomph on the initial hit to actually break anything loose and then it's out of air before it can continue to hit. He's only gonna have a few seconds before the impact has his pressure at nil.
 

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I have a bunch of air tools from my truck mechanic days but I pick up my Ryobi 1/4" cordless impact every time I can over dragging a hose out. I'll eventually buy a 1/2" but gotta wait on a deal. Not a terrible price at $139 with a battery pack and charger right now.


Those battery impact mfgs claiming "1400ft/lbs torque" are crazy. When I used to torque Cummins 855 head bolts we'd hammer them with a 1/2" impact till they stopped moving, bump them with a 3/4" impact, then click them with a 4ft long 3/4" drive torque wrench set to 305ft/lbs. We called that "torquing in sequence" (1/2" impact to 3/4" impact :D)

Below is what it really takes to hit 1400ft/lbs. 35lb CP797 tire gun. Rattled one for thousands of lug nuts with 160psi running it in truck shops. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000NOX2T4?tag=paramatandalin-20&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1


They'll probably take off the nuts if you have enough air volume and use a 3/8" hose--1/4" curly hose won't get it. . How big is your compressor? Tank size, HP, and CFM?
I just got the Ryobi 1/2" at HD for $99 w/battery and charger. Have other Ryobi tools so went with it and it worked great to put new blades on my JD.
 

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100 psi is plenty of pressure. Many air impact wrenches are rated at 90 psi. Yes, I know a lot of us run higher pressure than that. We shouldn't, we are probably voiding warranty.

A skinny air hose will reduce the pressure when the air is flowing. If cases like that, short 'burps' on the air wrench will allow for maximum pressure during the 'burp'.

Later,
Jerry C
 

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Thet are rated by foor pounts of troque & strokes per minute
Ge the biggest of both that you can afford.
Cub blades self tighten if not kept sharp
I cut off about 20 or so blade bolts / nuts a years & I have a 1" impact running off a 200 gallon tank at 150 PSI
 

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A good cordless Milwaukee M18 1/2" impact is all you need quick fast and in a hurry. No back up wrench or anything except a new set of blades. My Milwaukee M18 has 3 torque settings I use torque settings #3 to take the bolts off and torque setting #1 to torque down the new blades on my XT3GSX with 60" fab deck. If you can't spend the cash on a new one check the pawn shops I've seen them. Post #26 is a pic of mine. I also use it to rotate the tires on my truck and cars and buggies. Quick and easy.
 

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While I still use the HF electric impact, I recently picked up the Milwaukee M12 ⅜ inch impact wrench. With the 117 ft lbs of torque, it works for just about everything from taking the nuts off the deck of the XT3 GSX to other odd jobs like sinking lag screws.
 

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I don't have much to add, other than to reinforce a few things already mentioned.

Torque wrenches are only for tightening. Preferably for the final torquring only (not the full install).

6-POINT socket is a must, regardless of wrench/tool used to turn it.

Old school, block of wood, with a breaker bar (and cheater pipe if needed). Cheap and fairly easy.

HF electric impact wrenches are cheap and effective. I bought one to remove lug nuts on my RV (which were undoubtedly installed using an air gun at the tire shop).

Battery power is ideal if/when you can afford it. I finally broke down and started buying the Milwaukee M18 Fuel tools last year. I only have the 1/4-inch impact so far. It's struggled with a few things, but its lack of power helps keep me from destroying stuff, LOL...

Mike
 

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I've seen a few people above advise to not use an impact to remove nuts. I don't know why that would be. My shop mechanic uses Milwaukee impacts to do everything. Including removing lug nuts on skids/trucks/loaders. Never had a problem with damaging the impacts.
 

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I don't believe they were advising against using an impact to remove nuts, but that people shouldn't use a torque wrench (totally different) from removing nuts.

You can physically damage the measuring mechanism and/or mess up the calibration by using it to remove nuts/bolts (or by applying significantly more pressure when tightening a nut/bolt than it is set for).
 

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Torque wrenches are made to tighten a bolt to a specific torque value. They aren't made to loosen bolts. When your torque wrench isn't in use it should be set back to 0 torque value on the wrench to preserve its accuracy and internal components.
I'm still using my Dad's torque wrench that is atleast 50 yrs old. It is a stainless steel Sear Craftsman and it is still accurate because it has been maintained and stored properly. I also have his in/lb. torque wrench in the same quality condition.
Impacts, electric, air and cordless are widely used in the professional industry on a daily bases with 6 point impact sockets in all commercial settings. Then followed with a torque wrench for settings the final torque value.
A variable setting torque wrench is recommended to be versatile for a wide range of specific jobs.
 

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As to using an impact overall... ya. Some bolts are specifically recommended not to, others it doesn't matter. One way of thinking is that if it needs real heavy guns to remove it, maybe the heavy guns used to install it were... too heavy. Either that or it's been on there for a long long time, and nature has welded it.

As with lug nuts, blade nuts are often over-tightened. There is a torque spec that should be adhered to, anything more is asking for problems later on down the road.

Personally I prefer a smooth even wrench pull, without the impact induced shock which could potentially leave a busted stub to remove. I know lots of guys get away with it, sure. But for each time you overstress and stretch a bolt you increase the chances a five-minute job will turn into an all-day job.

I know everyone's mileage varies, but that's what I do. Big hammers for big Problems only.
 

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In my experience, the battery-powered impact wrenches are useless as impact wrenches, the best they can do is drive a nut that has already been loosened.

The funniest experience was when some kind of either salesman or marketing guy came up to me at racetrack pits to show their latest and greatest lighter smaller impact wrench, showing it off by comparison with a heavier more powerful one. So OK, let's try it! And... the smaller impact wrench couldn't undo a lugnut. Try the heavy one, that was supposed to be "too much for the job", and... it couldn't undo a lugnut either!

What I generally see is that they're way overrated. Later I've owned a battery-powered impact wrench rated at 250 lb*ft that couldn't undo the nuts tightened at 100 lb*ft. Worked great at driving the lugnuts after they've been loosened though :) The other way around, it didn't tighten to 100 lb*ft either but it left just enough slack for the final tightening with a torque wrench.

The air-powered impact wrenches work much better but the rule of thumb is about the same: pick one rated at 400 lb*ft if you plan undoing 100 lb*ft nuts. Harbor Freight has a good one rated at 700 lb*ft.
 

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Maybe try a real impact instead of a HF, try a Milwaukee or Snap-on they are the real deal. My Milwaukee will loosen my lug nuts torqued to 130 ft/lbs. Of course these impacts are $300 up in price.
 

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I can see where the confusion comes in as a torque wrench and an impact wrench are often called the same thing. Torque wrenches have a scale to determine torque when tightening a nut. Impact wrenches have a maximum torque value. Another way to look at it is that a torque wrench is a precision tool where an impact wrench often uses brute force.
 
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