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I started tearing down my 110 a few months ago, and am just now getting back to it. I have an item that I can't find in the jdparts schematics. I thought I took a photo of it before I removed it so I would know where it came from. However I can't find the photo. I think it was located near the solenoid. Any ideas?
 

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That is a ballast resistor. Not factory. If you aren’t familiar with what they are. They are used when a coil doesn’t have an internal resistor to prolong the life of your points. Check your coil. + post to - post should be 3.8-4.8 ohms. I’ll bet your coil is way lower than that.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks homesteader! There's a few non-factory parts on this thing. Makes it interesting!
 

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Gotta love the quick “repairs” that were made on some of this equipment. Like I said before. Inspect your coil, might need to replace it. While you are at it. Shake your coil. It shouldn’t slosh like a water bottle. I know from experience.
 

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Oh! So that's what a ballast resistor looks like! I've heard of people adding them when they can't get the proper coil or they're using one from a different machine/era, but I've never seen one!
 

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That is a ballast resistor. Not factory. If you aren’t familiar with what they are. They are used when a coil doesn’t have an internal resistor to prolong the life of your points.
Usually, the Kohler K engines had a built in resistor in the coil.
With very few exceptions, most coils do not have a "resistor" in them. They all have an internal resistance which can be calculated by the inherent resistance of the metal used in the wire for the primary winding, the diameter of the winding wire and the total length of the winding wire. Whether a particular coil needs an external resistor to help maximize the life of the points depends on the internal resistance (not resistor) and what the voltage of the system is. For a 6 volt system a coil with a resistance across its primary of 1.5 ohms does not need an external resistor. In a 12 volt system a coil with approcimately 3 ohms of resistance does not need an external resistor. Back in the old days, most vehicles(cars, tractors, etc.) had 6 volt systems so everybody made 1.5 ohm coils. When 12 volt systems came along, some manufacturers continued to use the 1.5 ohm coils and added a 1.5 ohm external resistor to make the total resistance 3 ohms, and others made 3 ohm coils.
 
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