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Hawaiian Hobby Farmer
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Put the battery on the charger as it wouldn't start yesterday. I am hoping it isn't a sign that the alternator is failing. But I will need to put off testing it for another day. We have the wire fencing coming in for our one acre tomorrow and so today is heavy trug day, moving tree trunks downed by the new fence crew that scrubbed the line and set the posts.
I will post photos of the work horse pulling away but as the Sun is just up here, I am just now getting coffeed up.
[Image was taken off the internet, too early for me to get my own photo today]
Photo Credit: Tech Tip for Recharging Your Motorcycle Battery the Right Way

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Put the battery on the charger as it wouldn't start yesterday. I am hoping it isn't a sign that the alternator is failing. But I will need to put off testing it for another day. We have the wire fencing coming in for our one acre tomorrow and so today is heavy trug day, moving tree trunks downed by the new fence crew that scrubbed the line and set the posts.
I will post photos of the work horse pulling away but as the Sun is just up here, I am just now getting coffeed up.
[Image was taken off the internet, too early for me to get my own photo today]
Photo Credit: Tech Tip for Recharging Your Motorcycle Battery the Right Way

View attachment 2495796
What's the border shape of your land? Mine is a simple rectangle.
 

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This is the closest thing I have to a family picture. It was my winter setup 3 years ago. The Craftsman was at my son's house at this point in it's life, and I hadn't upgraded my plow blade yet. I'll keep looking for more pictures of the Craftsman.

View attachment 2495763
Nice family pic, but really, only ONE shovel??? I have more ice chopping tools that that, LOL...

Mike
 

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Hawaiian Hobby Farmer
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What's the border shape of your land? Mine is a simple rectangle.
In my subdivision there are 8,850 lots and the standard lot size is 335L x 135W for exactly one acre. All sides of mine are string line straight. Expand the photo you can see the extent of the rocky lava. We did buy it for the twists and turn patterns showing in the rock. Amazing that rock here can be in liquid form.
What you can't see is that the "dirt" the plants are growing in is only inches deep. No Rototilling possible here, fencing goes in with a carbide auger or jackhammer for each post.
This google shot is about 10 years old and we have changed it a bit by adding a full length shed along the right side of the house, expanded the back lanai roof, put in a chicken coop(now a goat house) and a greenhouse where we moved the chickens.
24th house.png
 

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You're braver than me, living on/near liquid rock!

Mike
 
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Hawaiian Hobby Farmer
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You're braver than me, living on/near liquid rock!

Mike
Well, since every place has it's 'special' challenge, we decided that the slow (relatively) moving lava here would be better than some of the other things around this great country. I only wish the humidity here wouldn't cause so much grief with rust on the tractors. Photos-1 the last eruption that happened on our island that were well away from, and the rust that the volcanic gasses and humidity cause here. Metal preservation is definitely needed here!

1616795660393.png IMG_0408.JPG
 
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True. How much warning do you get when something like that opens up?

Mike
 
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SuperK, that is really cool! And that tractor looks great, it sure looks plenty heavy-duty! Living on/near liquid rock sounds "interesting" enough, but that sure beats under the liquid rock.

I can't imagine needing a jackhammer any time something needs to go into the ground. Are there any homeowner-suitable tools for stuff like that, or does every hole require a profession with big tools?
 
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SuperK, I think that front end loader is the first left hand loader I have ever seen
You mean as opposed to the ones that are built properly, for normal folks? :)
 
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Just never saw the loader controls on the left, but as soon as I say that I saw another picture of a loader on a sub compact with controls on the left.
So I guess I have just lead a sheltered life in mostly Cat equipment.
Throw in a sprinkling of Yanmar, Kubota, Ford, John Deere, Allis Chalmers, Link Belt, Terex, Takeuchi, Komatsu, Liebherr, Mitsubishi, Case, Bobcat and Terramite with a few that made such a good impression that I can't even remember the names.
Part of that might be I don't want to remember them or for anyone to know I ran such a piece of excellence.
 

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I want to say that some of the older garden-tractor-sized loaders gave you the option of which side to have the controls? I don't remember where I saw that.

I'm right-handed, but do most of my driving with my left hand. I think that's because of riding my bike as a kid, and the front (caliper) brake (operated with left hand) stopped MUCH faster than the rear.

Mike
 

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Hawaiian Hobby Farmer
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I can't imagine needing a jackhammer any time something needs to go into the ground. Are there any homeowner-suitable tools for stuff like that, or does every hole require a profession with big tools?
We all have the intermediate electrical driven level hammer drills like the these, though others have bigger ones for bigger projects. Most of the "dirt" on the islands is under the old sugar and pineapple plantation areas, not under my lot!
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True. How much warning do you get when something like that opens up?
None really. There is increased earthquake activity, from 100-200 a day and up, this one was putting out a lot of small quakes(1500/week of 2.0 and larger) with one 5.8(?) just before the gasses started seeping through the older flows. The whole island is lava in one form or another. Then it just starts oozing or spewing out. As far as a disaster, the lava is moving at relatively slow speeds - under 20 mph or so most eruptions, though some can be really fast. The USGS web site has a monitoring website for videos. Most times we do have some time to move out of the way. It does put out gasses that are noxious- SO2 to sulfuric acid rain when mixed with the humidity in the air or actual rain. There are also other gasses mixed in that form what the locals call VOG- volcanic fog that will kill plants, trees and animals and people if present in high enough concentrations. But again, moving out of the windward areas is enough to stay safe. Last eruption in 2018 we lost 700 homes, but no life, some minor injuries trying to get stuff moved in time and though we gained between 500-1000 acres of new land in the process, we lost an entire ocean Bay and it's ecosystems (Kapoho Bay) as it filled with the lava.
I want to say that some of the older garden-tractor-sized loaders gave you the option of which side to have the controls? I don't remember where I saw that.
Mike
This loader apparently came that way. Not sure that there was an option as this if the first diesel tractor I have ever owned. And it is only because the price and the deal literally fell into my lap. You know, the old, "...don't look a gift horse...." This page is from the owners manual
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This loader came to me that way. Not sure that there was an option it is the I have ever owned. And it is only because the price and the deal literally fell into my lap. You know, the old, "...don't look a gift horse...." This page is from the owners manual
View attachment 2496201
Whoops, I was referring to the wrong tractor - As for the Craftsman FEL I have, yes, it came this way. It was an add on "kit" so I imagine there was quite a number of places the controls could have been mounted.
 
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How does the "acres of new land" work out??? Isn't that just open areas of solidified lava (aka rock)? Can anything be done with that (assuming anyone would want to go near it)?

Mike
 
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We all have the intermediate electrical driven level hammer drills like the these, though others have bigger ones for bigger projects. Most of the "dirt" on the islands is under the old sugar and pineapple plantation areas, not under my lot!
View attachment 2496196
Those look like rotary hammers, to me, rather than hammer drills. A few years ago (while trying to split a granite boulder in my yard) I learned about the big difference between a rotary hammer, and a hammer drill.

My 18V DeWalt is a hammer drill. I got a masonry bit for it. It took me 15 minutes to drill a single hole to the depth I wanted. And I was going to need a lot of those holes.

After drilling a few, I decided this was not going to work, and bought a Harbor Freight rotary hammer (couldn't justify a nicer one). I got suitable bits for it, it is amazing. In a minute, it drilled deeper than my hammer drill did after 15 minutes. And it was much easier on your hands, with much less vibration.

It was incredible, how much more effective it was than my little hammer drill. I made a bunch more holes than originally expected, and deeper than planned. It would have taken forever with my original drill. A friend used this one last year to split some rocks bigger than mine, it did great for him. We used my "wedge and feathers" set to split them, those are also very cool.

I'm just glad I don't need to use something like this for any work that touches the ground, though! Yikes.

1-1/8 in. SDS Variable Speed Rotary Hammer Kit
 

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Hawaiian Hobby Farmer
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How does the "acres of new land" work out??? Isn't that just open areas of solidified lava (aka rock)? Can anything be done with that (assuming anyone would want to go near it)?
Hawaii is the only State in the US that is growing every year, and averages about 500 to 1000 acres per year. The only land considered "NEW" is the lava that flows into the sea and stays put. Remember that we are on the top of an undersea mountain and most of the lava flows down the sides after it enters the water.
The new land is setting up as solid rock within a few hours after erupting though the rock, as you might imagine, is rocket hot for a long while. If the flow continues in the same direction it just pushes up and over the cooler but still hot older flow. It is very surprising however, to find that new plant growth arrives within just a month or two after it is cooled. Ferns and the local Ohia trees are generally first in line. The Ohia has adapted to be able to force its roots through the minute open passage ways and cracks and fissures to get a foothold.
No one is allowed to go back on the flow until the USGA deems it safe to do so. As far as ones property boundaries are concerned, they are still exactly where they were and GPS have made finding them far easier. Once you get the ok, tractors, well, Bulldozers with ripping hooks can set to it work grubbing out the uneven land (rock) and the process of living can get back to not unlike Hurricanes, Tornados or any other Natural disaster. The USGA has to clear the land because they have the maps of the old lava tubes and we sometimes loose bull dozers and equipment if the roof of the lava tubes collapse when they are rolling over them. To get the land back to a building state, think of each flow as a layer of cake icing, built over time, it can be quite thick and leveling the land is simply a matter of peeling the upper layers off, breaking them up and re-laying them in a more even compacted layer. Ownership of the 'new' land is under the States purview until they decide how to zone and allot ownership.
The photo counterclockwise from left upper corner:
Kapoho Bay before
Kapoho bay after
Then Ferns and Ohia growing in the cracks.
Bulldozer falling into an empty lava tube
Bulldozer ready to start ripping the lava
2496277

Those look like rotary hammers, to me, rather than hammer drills. A few years ago (while trying to split a granite boulder in my yard) I learned about the big difference between a rotary hammer, and a hammer drill
Correct, they are rotary hammers. Thanks for the catch. At the time I couldn't think of their names. But they are everywhere out here. The fence we just paid to have put in, was done with a hydraulic auger with Carbide teeth which is what it takes to get through the blue rock lave we have. Even with the Carbide, it does take some time to drill- our guys were here for 5 working days to grub the growth and pile it up- I took care of the that since I want to mulch it up, but they also ran T posts by using a hydraulic jackhammer with a 2" point and cemented them in, corner posts were augured in and then cemented. All together they ran 13 corner 3" pipes at and 50 plus T posts in that time.
Nothing here is easy.
 
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Gotcha. How do homes and vehicles get swallowed or burned up, with no warning, and people don't die???

Mike
 
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Gotcha. How do homes and vehicles get y.swallowed or burned up, with no warning, and people don't die???

Mike
Well, the no warning thing is more that there is nothing like storm clouds, wind, hail or the other precursors to the big disasters of the mainland. Once the eruption starts, there is the gas, the hissing and spitting of bubbles coming through the liquid rock, and the Lava does boil when it breaches the surface and looses the earths pressure. The no warning is also that no one has been able to predict where it will erupt from, let alone when.
As for escape, unless it is right under your feet, it is a slow going process. Reasonably easy to out run. We do have some explosive fissures, but not lately. On Kona side, (Western Hawaii) there are boulders the size of a Costco warehouse that have been blown out of craters, but that was hundreds of years ago.
People in the immediate area simply leave everything behind. It is an uphill /downhill gravity thing so its easy to go where it is not. There are usually very few roads going in the same direction and unless people are at their homes when it happens, they can't get back for their stuff. National Guard response is awesome and they get activated pretty fast to block roads and set up roadblocks. Not their first rodeos and it is a small Island.
Though they really wont redirect a Lava flow like on TV, the bulldozers they bring in can eliminate the brush that can burn larger areas in a wildfire than the flow can. You figure that temps hot enough to get rock to a liquid state can dry out even the lushest jungles we have here in a heart beat. Google Lava Tree national park. Interesting photos.
 
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