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Yep, just be careful winding and tightening the spring and make sure you have the same number of winds on both sides!!
 

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My brother and I removed a 10x10 wooden overhead door with those torsion springs,that I was given for free at my brothers work place--they were expanding the building and that door was going to just be scrapped--,and were lucky we survived the ordeal...we were about 20 feet up on one of those rolling hydraulic lift platforms,the door was on a warehouse and went straight up,so the springs had to mount that high up..
We had one pry bar with a pointed end and a 3 foot length of threaded rod to use to "unwind" the springs..

We released the set screws holding the spring drum to the shaft and both of us had to hold the full tension back,and let it unwind a half turn,then shove another piece of round stock in the spring hub to hold it while we removed the bars and put then in the next set of holes,and pull the pin out,unwind it another half turn,--repeated this about 10 times,all the while fearing we'd get killed if we "slipped"..
Eventually both of us were losing the strength in our arms to hold the tension back--my brother said "I cant hold it any longer",and I said "Me neither"!--on the count of three,we both pulled the pry bars out and turned away and ducked--the springs unwound very violently and luckily we did not get injured,but a ton of dust flew everywhere and went in our eyes..other employees nearby all came running when they heard the noise !...

I was also given the curved tracks and "stretch" springs off another door that had already been removed,I decided to use those instead of the torsion type when I installed the door on my garage--that was hard enough,they had double springs,one inside the other,weighed about 135 lbs,had to use a chain falls to pick them up when I put the door & tracks together in my garage alone..I opted not to use the garage door opener they had ,it had a 3/4 HP electric motor with chain driven sprockets and jack shafts to lift the heavy door..

I had to do some mods to the curved tracks to get them to work on my application,and looking back,I would have been better off just buying a new door and have a professional install it--it is not badly rotted 25 years later and I've had to patch it up with sheet metal and angle iron to keep it from coming apart..
I'd never fool with torsion springs again,I was 35 years old when I got that door and it darn near killed me by the time I got it off its former building and installed and working on my garage..I'd get a metal or fiberglass door too,wood gets very heavy when wet and rots..
 

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Ugh, good luck! Ours use extension springs, which can be replaced by homeowners. I thought I'd read a while back that the torsion springs, like yours, need to be done by professionals, due to safety concerns. But maybe that's wrong.
Yes...they need to be done by professionals...Steve Urquel taught them how to do it. 😁
 

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Yes...they need to be done by professionals...Steve Urquel taught them how to do it.
That's probably true :) And they may have started as torsion springs for a garage door, and ended up being hydraulically powered, running the doors for the giant hanger that NASA uses for some of their nicer rockets.
 

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Yes...they need to be done by professionals...Steve Urquel taught them how to do it. 😁
I was the shop foreman in the trailer shop where we did the WM refurbs. Taught many Mexican and Salvadorean immigrants how to do them safely--speaking to them in Spanish no less.

Some of the Fruehauf trailers had what was called a shallow header where the operator sat inside it. You had to tension them with 90deg curved bars to get inside the header. Sometimes the bars would flip around on you under tension trying to get the next hole and come out then the operator would spin in your face.

No one ever got hurt by a spring in that shop and I only know of one guy who told me an old rusty spring broke when he was winding it and busted his forehead open.

To detension old springs that everything would be replaced on we would roll the door up, clamp the track below a roller, and cut the cables with a die grinder letting the operator spin all the tension off.
 

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I remember one time with swinging doors I was picking up a loaded trailer and I had to check inside it first..I swung the hasp up and was able to lift the handle out of the bottom half of the hasp, but the load had fallen over and leaning so hard against the back door that I could not swing the handle out...I kept yanking on it and when it came loose the load caused the door to fly open and the handle cracked me in the forehead....still have the scar...I was bleeding like crazy
 

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I remember one time with swinging doors I was picking up a loaded trailer and I had to check inside it first..I swung the hasp up and was able to lift the handle out of the bottom half of the hasp, but the load had fallen over and leaning so hard against the back door that I could not swing the handle out...I kept yanking on it and when it came loose the load caused the door to fly open and the handle cracked me in the forehead....still have the scar...I was bleeding like crazy
Ouch. I did that with a bulk load of taters. They had pallets at the rear with load locks on them. I opened the doors and the taters tried to bury me. Got the pallets back up and started shoveling.
 

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The lawn fertilizer guys are here (a day early) to aerate and seed. This is the first time I'm paying someone else to do the job. In watching this, I am able to confirm they're not doing anything I can't do myself, with my existing equipment...

They're using a ride-on machine that appears to be dedicated to core aeration. The plugs they pulled are no longer than what I can get with my Brinly tow-behind core aerator (and a lot of weight).

Don't know if that's a bad sign of how compacted (and/or thin in some areas) that my soil is. I don't remember the last time I dethatched or aerated the lawn, but I'm guessing it's been two or more years.

As for the seeding, they're pushing a rotary spreader. I was expecting more of a "slice seeding" which I assume gets the seed into the ground?

Oh well, they're getting it done much faster than I would, if for no other reason than they're using two guys and two machines.

Mike
 

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This is where I had the 3205 and brush hog down in yesterday. About where the tree with no leaves is. Pretty gnarly area. Can't believe I didnt get stuck lol.

20200914_170216.jpg



And dug out my old roll up door operator winding bars. The curved ones are for the shallow header Fruehauf trailers. Man they were a pain to wind.

20200914_171404.jpg
 

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Just looking at those bars makes me wince, lol...

Mike
 

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This is where I had the 3205 and brush hog down in yesterday. About where the tree with no leaves is. Pretty gnarly area. Can't believe I didnt get stuck lol.

View attachment 2473368


And dug out my old roll up door operator winding bars. The curved ones are for the shallow header Fruehauf trailers. Man they were a pain to wind.

View attachment 2473370
OK guys we don't need to be measuring our winding bars on here...this is a family friendly site!! :)
 

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@mikeinri,

How do you like the tow behind Brinly Core Plug Aerator?

I just bought there De-Thatcher, and really like it ... I also have a Craftsman tow behind Spiker, and like that as well ... I am considering getting the Brinly Core Plug Aerator like you have.
 

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Just looking at those bars makes me wince, lol...

Mike
Those bars have so much experience you can just get them near an unwound operator, they fly into the holes and start winding. They know which way to go and how many wraps. You just hang on to them and they do all the work. :D
OK guys we don't need to measuring our winding bars on here...this is a family friendly site!! :)
It's not the size of your bar...No wait....It IS about the size of your bar. When I had enough room to use those big boys it was like cruising in a Cadillac. So easy to wind up an operator with that leverage.

Wal-Mart switched to Whiting doors halfway thru out refurb process. They had dual sided operators with a full length sleeve inside the spring which kept the spring stretched(a spring lengthens as you wind it)

They were really sweet. You wound the cables on the spools and taped them on leaving 12" of cable sticking out. Put the door in and leave it UP with it clamped a foot back. Hook up the cables to the door and put one wrap of tension on the operator. You could do it without a bar at all. Then when you lowered the door the lowering tensioned the operator. Soooo nice.

Seeing mine was a dual-sided operator I hoped it had the sleeves inside it but it doesn't. I'll have to wrap it all the way. NBD though. Those coils are small and I think I have enough room to use my long Cadillac bars.
 

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@mikeinri,

How do you like the tow behind Brinly Core Plug Aerator?

I just bought there De-Thatcher, and really like it ... I also have a Craftsman tow behind Spiker, and like that as well ... I am considering getting the Brinly Core Plug Aerator like you have.
I know I wasn't the one being asked, and I think I'd mentioned it already. But I used my Brinly last weekend, it's been good to me. Mine is the 40" version, there was also a 48" style of mine. It seems solid, and there's a big handle to let you raise/lower the spoons. I can't do that from the seat. I think someone posted a modification they did to theirs, with a powered raise/lower mechanism.
 
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I have the craftsman 40 inch dethatcher and craftsman 32 inch aerater/seeder that work well. They both require two cider blocks for weight. The ground has to be soft to use aerater/seeder.
 
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Mike, That plug aerater and power seed sounds like a good thing to have done professionally every year. I may look into that. Hiring an environmental service. I did get rid of all the clover in the yard after using like eight spray bottles.
 

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That's fantastic what your guy offered to do... don't find many straight shooters like that around anymore.
 
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I think my aerater/seeder is made by Brinly. I tried to use it on those bare spots and it wouldn't even dig in. The spikes stayed on the surface. That's how I ended up with that rock rake. That didn't loosen the soil. I've seen one of these drums you fill with water and tow behind your tractor looks effective. Maybe is this and use the aerater/seeder to put the seed down.

towable-aerator-400.jpg
 

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I worked for, and had my own overhead door business for 15 years. I don't care what other people in this thread have said, and worked on tractor trailer doors or whatever. You need 2 springs, 2 winding cones, 2 stationary cones, and two 3/8" winding bars to do this job. You'll probably also need a spring gauge reader, and a conversion chart to tell you what other springs can be used if the ones you originally had aren't available. Before putting the new springs on, you'll have to "kill" the other spring that still has full tension on it. Then you'll have to remove the entire shaft and drums, put the new springs on the new winding and stationary cones on, and then put the whole shaft assembly back in place prior to winding the springs. And prior to winding the new springs, you'll have to know how to wind the cables on the drums, and then put a vice grips on the shaft to hold it with the tension on the cables, etc, etc... Call a professional to have the job done right. It'll cost you about 300.00, but it will be done correctly, and you won't be injured. And in overhead door vernacular, an "operator" is actually the "opener", and has nothing to do with the overhead door itself, other than opening it.
 
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One thing about hiring a professional, the workmanship is all on him. If it ain't right, he has to make it right. Even after a year or so.You have recourse. Also, he be someone you can call in the future if you have problems. We had new springs and cables replaced a few years ago. For some reason a cable broke and the same people showed up the same day it broke and replaced the cable. We were impressed with the response.
 
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