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I hope you get well . We have been sick off and on probably more these last few years than all the ones before . The only way I have been able to stay on my feet is just let some work get behind and make my self rest .
If I am going to function or be here at all that's the way it has to be. Any more the we or what's at home comes first and then if I feel like it, it's the they. After all if I cannot do what I need to do at home, why waste my time away from home and suffer afterwards. I still have a longggg list of what hasn't gotten done yet this year. Some may not get done but at least I will be home to try and not some where else.
 

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Couch surfing and resting my voice. I sound like crap. I sent an inquiry about a new Toyota Corolla Cross compact AWD SUV to my Toyota dealer and left my phone number off of it, just included my email.

Idiot salesman called me since that's where I bought my truck and they have my number on file. I can't speak and he's trying to get me to order one sight unseen. Said they didn't have one to drive then treated me like I was an idiot for not just having him order one. Lol.

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I know absolutely nada about the Toyota. When we were looking to trade in our oil consuming Jeep with 180,000 miles on it, we looked hard at Subaru Foresters. The company where my wife works maintains a fleet of vehicles and they switched from Toyota vans to Subarus for several reasons. The vans' seat kept breaking, and other minor but on going problems with knobs falling off and controls not working. Plus the Subaru Forester has AWD for use during the winter at a lower cost than the Toyota van. So we bought a new 2020 base model Forester and we love it! We have about 30,000 miles on it and with the exception of the OEM tires wearing out at 28,000 miles, all has been good. We had a Kia a while back and never EVER again!!!!!!
 

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What did I do today? I went to the bank to withdraw some $$$ then stopped at Burger King to get some cheap food off the "Value Menu"......... except they no longer have a value menu at that Burger King. I got 3 Whopper Juniors (they are small) and it cost me over $12. No fries because I'm limiting my intake of salt. Then I went grocery shopping. My new favorite pasta is the one brand that was under $2 a box, and my new favorite spaghetti sauce is the one that costs less than $3 a jar. My new favorite breakfast cereal is, well....... none as almost all cost over $5 a box. At least the flavors I like and I'm pretty flexible on cereal. Depressing day. But the original Top Gun is on my TV and I'm feeling better already.
 
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It started raining in the afternoon, so I cut work short, and worked on adjusting the sides of my truck's bed (it's a cab&chassis truck, with a flatbed wood deck, and removable sides).

For a number of years I've been using an 18' 11k carhauler trailer to transport my equipment, year-round, and it works well, even if it's total overkill for the job (all the equipment on it for spring cleanup is maybe 2-3k lbs or so, it's just a lot of stuff that takes up a bunch of space, and I haul around less the rest of the time). This summer, I've trimmed down what I haul around all the time to not include the 52" Snapper w bagger, as I was only using it for a single, large property, but that property also requires using smaller stuff because of a bunch of mounts they put in the yard (the 52" would scalp them), it doesn't save me much time vs just using smaller stuff to do the whole job (34" Snapper and a 21" Ariens). So, I worked out I can haul everything I use (34" Snapper, 30" Toro Turfmaster, and 2 21" Ariens (the 1 I use and a spare) on my flatbed, and leave the trailer at home.

One thing in the way of doing this, is the removeable side panel near the ramps I made for loading equipment on the flatbed, it would catch on the blower for the Snapper's bagger setup. Today, I modified it so that it wouldn't do that anymore. The pic goes the amount I cut off, and the extension I added to the ramp mounts for holding the now-shorter section of side in place.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber

And those folding ramps work awesome, it's fast and easy to lower and raise them, and there's no chance of them slipping off the truck. I do have to watch where I park so the ramps have room to extend out, but it's WAY better than when I was using some store-bought folding ramps that just sit on top of the edge of the deck.

Also replaced the transmission cable on my Ariens 21" mower, the old cable was only hanging on by a couple of strands, and adjusted the bracket holding the end of the cable where it frayed so the cable wouldn't rub on the metal end of the sheath as it moves in/out during use.

An update on my rhubarb patch, they seem to have taken hold and not just die on me:
Plant Terrestrial plant Compost Grass Shrub
 

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Discussion Starter · #23,866 ·
Holy heck y'all! Just woke up with the dog screaming bloody murder downstairs. Came down and there was a huge calico cat in my house. It had come in the dog door and was trying to get out but had no idea where it was. It was running thru the house trying to jump thru all the closed windows and running headfirst into the sliding glass door.

It was jumping up to 7ft high and bonking the windows and just circling the house. I opened the front door and the sliding glass door that the dog door insert is in and it went out the slider. It was dazed from smashing its head into a dozen windows by that time.

I saw the cat go towards the back holler and chain link fence and assumed it jumped the fence. My dog went out the dog door to survey the yard and started running the fence row screeching again and then I saw the cat climbing a tree back there. Called the dog back in and blocked the dog door.

That cat was too well fed to have been a stray. In 28yrs of owning a dog door that is the first thing other than my dogs to have ever come thru it.
 

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Holy heck y'all! Just woke up with the dog screaming bloody murder downstairs. Came down and there was a huge calico cat in my house. It had come in the dog door and was trying to get out but had no idea where it was. It was running thru the house trying to jump thru all the closed windows and running headfirst into the sliding glass door.

It was jumping up to 7ft high and bonking the windows and just circling the house. I opened the front door and the sliding glass door that the dog door insert is in and it went out the slider. It was dazed from smashing its head into a dozen windows by that time.

I saw the cat go towards the back holler and chain link fence and assumed it jumped the fence. My dog went out the dog door to survey the yard and started running the fence row screeching again and then I saw the cat climbing a tree back there. Called the dog back in and blocked the dog door.

That cat was too well fed to have been a stray. In 28yrs of owning a dog door that is the first thing other than my dogs to have ever come thru it.
Wow!!! What a way to wake up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #23,868 ·
Wow!!! What a way to wake up!
Yeah, I thought my little dog was getting killed down here. All I heard was screaming and thudding. The cat was too freaked out to attack my dog but if it had wanted to it would have been a bad deal. It was well over 2X the size of my 6.5lb dog.
 

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Yeah, I thought my little dog was getting killed down here. All I heard was screaming and thudding. The cat was too freaked out to attack my dog but if it had wanted to it would have been a bad deal. It was well over 2X the size of my 6.5lb dog.
Yeah, that would have been really ugly.

We have considered getting a doggy door at times. Your story now has me wondering what else could get in through one? Domestic cat is one thing. But how about raccoon, armadillo, or - - big snake??!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #23,870 ·
Yeah, that would have been really ugly.

We have considered getting a doggy door at times. Your story now has me wondering what else could get in through one? Domestic cat is one thing. But how about raccoon, armadillo, or - - big snake??!!
I've had one for 28 years. That was the first thing ever. No snakes, mice, nothing and I live in the woods. No houses behind me for a mile--just forest.
 

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Holy heck y'all! Just woke up with the dog screaming bloody murder downstairs. Came down and there was a huge calico cat in my house. It had come in the dog door and was trying to get out but had no idea where it was. It was running thru the house trying to jump thru all the closed windows and running headfirst into the sliding glass door.

It was jumping up to 7ft high and bonking the windows and just circling the house. I opened the front door and the sliding glass door that the dog door insert is in and it went out the slider. It was dazed from smashing its head into a dozen windows by that time.

I saw the cat go towards the back holler and chain link fence and assumed it jumped the fence. My dog went out the dog door to survey the yard and started running the fence row screeching again and then I saw the cat climbing a tree back there. Called the dog back in and blocked the dog door.

That cat was too well fed to have been a stray. In 28yrs of owning a dog door that is the first thing other than my dogs to have ever come thru it.
hahah , .. had that been my dogs there would just be a bloody furry splat on the carpet . I've heard of snakes getting in doggy doors too .
 

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regarding all this talk about lawn mower blades and antiseize . I've always greased mower blade bolts and my lug nuts and never had any issues . lugs have a torque spec too and I use a torque wrench to put mine on (110 lbs.ft for toyota ) and also use the correct sequence . when you tighten a fastner the "torque" is the measurement of the amount of friction it takes to tignten said fastener to the point the bolt/stud starts to stretch and fit almost like something pressed together . that said , ive never seen a properly torqued fastener loosen itself lubed or unlubed .
if it's something so critical the engineers believe it MAY come out, they will use a wire wrapped safety nut or castle nut with a cotter . also. , every blade I've ever taken off was left hand thread. bolts just don't back out unless the threads are worn or damaged or not torqued to spec..if you put too much grease , anti or whatever and try to torque . you won't get to spec because it's compressing the grease at the bottom of the bolt , I agree with that and yes it will back itself out
. but some lube on the threads never hurt anything . on the contrary if the threads have a small booger or to dry/dirty it will create too much friction and the threads bind giving you a false torque reading on your instrument ... I've broken more studs off of wheels than I can shake a stick at because some idiot never put a lick of anything on the threads. you run em off with a gun and it just binds and snaps the stud off . I think the whole " lubeing threads is a no no " thing is an old wives tale just like "if you put a battery on a concrete floor it will discharge " consider parts that are constantly submerged in oil , like transmission valve bodies for example . no doubt every part of the bolt and hole thread area is always covered in atf , as well as subject to thermal expansion and vibration . they don't back themselves out .
 

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Discussion Starter · #23,873 ·
6.5lbs of fury. Rubi-rose checking her back yard for cat intrusion.

 

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Discussion Starter · #23,874 ·
regarding all this talk about lawn mower blades and antiseize . I've always greased mower blade bolts and my lug nuts and never had any issues . lugs have a torque spec too and I use a torque wrench to put mine on (110 lbs.ft for toyota ) and also use the correct sequence . when you tighten a fastner the "torque" is the measurement of the amount of friction it takes to tignten said fastener to the point the bolt/stud starts to stretch and fit almost like something pressed together . that said , ive never seen a properly torqued fastener loosen itself lubed or unlubed .
if it's something so critical the engineers believe it MAY come out, they will use a wire wrapped safety nut or castle nut with a cotter . also. , every blade I've ever taken off was left hand thread. bolts just don't back out unless the threads are worn or damaged or not torqued to spec..if you put too much grease , anti or whatever and try to torque . you won't get to spec because it's compressing the grease at the bottom of the bolt , I agree with that and yes it will back itself out
. but some lube on the threads never hurt anything . on the contrary if the threads have a small booger or to dry/dirty it will create too much friction and the threads bind giving you a false torque reading on your instrument ... I've broken more studs off of wheels than I can shake a stick at because some idiot never put a lick of anything on the threads. you run em off with a gun and it just binds and snaps the stud off . I think the whole " lubeing threads is a no no " thing is an old wives tale just like "if you put a battery on a concrete floor it will discharge " but I went to school for this plus 30 years of professional wrench turning so what do I know .
I worked diesel truck fleet for 7 years before trailer wreck rebuild for 13 years. Some fasteners were supposed to be torqued and backed off several times to polish the threads before final torque to eliminate any hot spots. All torque values were dry or oiled spec and those specs are different. Torque is a value to approximate bolt stretch which is how a torqued fastener keeps from backing off.

Rod bolts are a critical component that bolt stretch is often measured to attain the proper torque/stretch value. Here is a vid that shows the difference in different lubes on bolt stretch. If I'm torquing to a spec I always do it according to what the manufacturer specs for that bolt.

And a manufacturer's chart with dry vs oiled spec
Font Parallel Pattern Number Rectangle
 

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I've had one for 28 years. That was the first thing ever. No snakes, mice, nothing and I live in the woods. No houses behind me for a mile--just forest.
Sounds like one of those wake-ups where Adrenaline is already pumping full-force, those will get your attention! Glad your dog didn't mix it up with the cat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23,876 ·
Sounds like one of those wake-ups where Adrenaline is already pumping full-force, those will get your attention! Glad your dog didn't mix it up with the cat.
I think she was within 2ft of the cat screeching at it. It was too freaked out to try to do anything but get away. I think its back probably hit the ceiling when Rubi ran out of her bedroom screaming like a banshee
 

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I worked diesel truck fleet for 7 years before trailer wreck rebuild for 13 years. Some fasteners were supposed to be torqued and backed off several times to polish the threads before final torque to eliminate any hot spots. All torque values were dry or oiled spec and those specs are different. Torque is a value to approximate bolt stretch which is how a torqued fastener keeps from backing off.

Rod bolts are a critical component that bolt stretch is often measured to attain the proper torque/stretch value. Here is a vid that shows the difference in different lubes on bolt stretch. If I'm torquing to a spec I always do it according to what the manufacturer specs for that bolt.

And a manufacturer's chart with dry vs oiled spec
View attachment 2555879
I worked diesel truck fleet for 7 years before trailer wreck rebuild for 13 years. Some fasteners were supposed to be torqued and backed off several times to polish the threads before final torque to eliminate any hot spots. All torque values were dry or oiled spec and those specs are different. Torque is a value to approximate bolt stretch which is how a torqued fastener keeps from backing off.

Rod bolts are a critical component that bolt stretch is often measured to attain the proper torque/stretch value. Here is a vid that shows the difference in different lubes on bolt stretch. If I'm torquing to a spec I always do it according to what the manufacturer specs for that bolt.

And a manufacturer's chart with dry vs oiled spec
View attachment 2555879
basically what I said but I didn't research anything online , I know all about torque to yield bolts lol . (ASE cert with several toyota credentials) I never did heavy trucks so specifics change like I'm sure they don't use zink alloy fastners on trucks (not zink plated) Yada yada..
 

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Discussion Starter · #23,878 · (Edited)
basically what I said but I didn't research anything online , I know all about torque to yield bolts lol . (ASE cert with several toyota credentials) I never did heavy trucks so specifics change like I'm sure they don't use zink alloy fastners on trucks (not zink plated) Yada yada..
Not sure what you mean by zinc alloy fasteners. The chart is broken down into zinc plated accounting for the zinc plating reducing friction just like oil does so the fastener needs less torque to achieve the proper stretch.

I guess I'm confused because when you said oiling threads is a wives tale I thought you meant that you didn't believe what is industry standard in torquing bolts. ???
 
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Not sure what you mean by zinc alloy fasteners. The chart is broken down into zinc plated accounting for the zinc plating reducing friction just like oil does so the fastener needs less torque to achieve the proper stretch.

I guess I'm confused because when you said oiling threads is a wives tale I thought you meant that you didn't believe what is industry standard in torquing bolts. ???
I DO advocate oiling threaded parts yes , per the origional debate of why you shouldnt lube lug nuts and lawnmower blade bolts . zink alloy bolts are used in applications like high rpm race engines where grams of weight matter . they are not to be reused ever, similar to stretch bolts once they are torqued the integrity of the bolt is compromised if it's retightened due to the metallurgy , not the fact that it's stretched beyond spec. common in modern BMW, Mercedes, Porsche and aviation engines . not trying to stir up crap , just my opinion and they all stink like everybody else's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23,880 ·
I DO advocate oiling threaded parts yes , per the origional debate of why you shouldnt lube lug nuts and lawnmower blade bolts . zink alloy bolts are used in applications like high rpm race engines where grams of weight matter . they are not to be reused ever, similar to stretch bolts once they are torqued the integrity of the bolt is compromised if it's retightened due to the metallurgy , not the fact that it's stretched beyond spec. common in modern BMW, Mercedes, Porsche and aviation engines . not trying to stir up crap , just my opinion and they all stink like everybody else's.
I understand that the discussion was about lubing wheel studs. What I'm saying is that the torque value for wheel studs is dry. There isn't a torque value for lubed studs because no manufacturer advocates lubing them. If you are lubing them and torquing them to dry spec then you are over-torquing them and thus they are not torqued to spec.

I have lubed wheel studs in the past and didn't have problems. Never used a a torque wrench on them either in all my years of mechanic service and never had a problem. As I have been out of the biz for 13 years I trust my feel for torque has diminished and I use my torque wrenches more now due to that. So, I use my torque wrench and torque to spec--which is dry. Not opinion or anecdotal info--manufacturer spec.

Per GM: NEVER USE LUBRICANTS OR PENETRATING OILS ON WHEEL STUDS, NUTS OR MOUNTING SURFACES, AS THIS CAN RAISE THE ACTUAL TORQUE ON THE NUT WITHOUT CORRESPONDING TORQUE READING ON THE TORQUE WRENCH. WHEEL NUTS, STUDS AND MOUNTING SURFACES MUST BE CLEAN AND DRY. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS COULD RESULT IN WHEEL, NUT, AND/OR STUD FAILURE
 
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