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You mean the OP or how I do it. If I ask my wife, I'm sure she has something somewhere to pull out.:)
OP was my original thought but we all like pics ..post some then
 
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I wouldn't usually have encountered this thread (my garden tractor is a diesel-powered Ford GT-75), but it showed up in today's "trending posts" e-mail.

I just happened to be using my GT for pulling some shrubs yesterday and thought I'd add my experiences here. First, I see that Pullerbear was mentioned earlier in this thread. My experience with this class of tools (I've got two sizes of Weed Wrenches) is that they are very effective. I have used my Weed Wrenches over the years to pull many, many shrubs and saplings. They're my "go to" tools for pulling the common stuff around the yard (usually, weeds and saplings that I've let go too long :)).

However, when faced with clearing a very large area of shrubs and saplings over our septic leach field (it was already getting bad when we moved into this house and only got worse, of course), I decided I wanted to explore other options, as I'm not sure my body could take pulling so much stuff by hand. Probably 100+ things to pull. So, just yesterday, I decided to give a Brush Grubber BG-01 a try. It worked rather well.

I suspect the reasons it was worked well (but doesn't always based on the reviews I've read, for various reasons) are:
  • the deep lug tires on this GT (they're Firestone Flotation tires) really bite;
  • the diesel engine is torquey as heck and pulls like a freight train, despite only being 16 hp. (even spins the above-mentioned tires);
  • the soil was nice and moist (I picked a great time to do this; weather is perfect and soil isn't all hard and dry like it would be in summer);
  • the shrubs (most seem to be the same, but I have no idea what they are) have shallow roots, but fairly spread out and bend enough so I can pull them sideways (usually!) without breaking them off.
Based on my experience, the BG-01 — along with some grade 70 5/16 in. chain and appropriate slip hooks — is right-sized for a garden tractor. I would not expect a garden tractor to be able to pull out anything much larger than what I've been dealing with unless additional digging/cutting is done first.









 

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We've been getting rain like crazy. I've pulled bushes and small trees up by the roots with a harbor freight winch on tractor.
I wind cable around about six times, then a 6"x6" post chocked the wheels. If there's a big tree behind tractor I'll strap back of tractor to it.

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I would be afraid of pulling the tractor in half.
 

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Use a chain and your truck. Forget your 540, it will not be worth the possible damage to it to save a little money on pulling up the bushes and it was not designed to do that kind of pulling. Cut the top part off and then dig around the stump. Allow some slack in the chain and rev up the engine before jerking the stump. Do not apply power with the chain taut because you will only tear up your yard with spinning wheels. Just like painting a car, all of the work is in the prep.
 

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I wouldn't usually have encountered this thread (my garden tractor is a diesel-powered Ford GT-75), but it showed up in today's "trending posts" e-mail.

I just happened to be using my GT for pulling some shrubs yesterday and thought I'd add my experiences here. First, I see that Pullerbear was mentioned earlier in this thread. My experience with this class of tools (I've got two sizes of Weed Wrenches) is that they are very effective. I have used my Weed Wrenches over the years to pull many, many shrubs and saplings. They're my "go to" tools for pulling the common stuff around the yard (usually, weeds and saplings that I've let go too long :)).

However, when faced with clearing a very large area of shrubs and saplings over our septic leach field (it was already getting bad when we moved into this house and only got worse, of course), I decided I wanted to explore other options, as I'm not sure my body could take pulling so much stuff by hand. Probably 100+ things to pull. So, just yesterday, I decided to give a Brush Grubber BG-01 a try. It worked rather well.

I suspect the reasons it was worked well (but doesn't always based on the reviews I've read, for various reasons) are:
  • the deep lug tires on this GT (they're Firestone Flotation tires) really bite;
  • the diesel engine is torquey as heck and pulls like a freight train, despite only being 16 hp. (even spins the above-mentioned tires);
  • the soil was nice and moist (I picked a great time to do this; weather is perfect and soil isn't all hard and dry like it would be in summer);
  • the shrubs (most seem to be the same, but I have no idea what they are) have shallow roots, but fairly spread out and bend enough so I can pull them sideways (usually!) without breaking them off.
Based on my experience, the BG-01 — along with some grade 70 5/16 in. chain and appropriate slip hooks — is right-sized for a garden tractor. I would not expect a garden tractor to be able to pull out anything much larger than what I've been dealing with unless additional digging/cutting is done first.









Boy that Shibaura/Ford is in nice condition (y)
 

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Anything type of update?
 

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Well this one works well. Sorry but I needed this for other things and I did get rid of a couple trees with just the bucket then filed the hole in.

I have 20 small trees to go once it comes back from the job we're doing.
 

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I'm late finding this, but thank you to all for a ton of good info. I have some videos to watch, it seems.

I have a few things that I'm hoping to remove this season, so this is great info. I plan to see if I can get my hands on a farm jack, since that seems like a nice approach.

I need some chains for this and some other stuff, and had been shopping around. Harbor Freight currently has their 5/16" 20' grade 70 tow chain on sale for $30, Home Depot is about $37 for seemingly the same thing. So I may grab some from HF.

Lots of good suggestions about roots. My hope was to use a carbide-tipped blade on my Sawzall to cut through roots, before trying to remove the stump.

A friend suggested using the pressure washer to help expose the roots, by blasting the dirt away.

I haven't tried this yet, but it seemed like an interesting idea to me, anyways. Due to some neck issues, I'm trying to minimize needing to hack away with a shovel, etc, since that ended up being fairly painful the last time I tried it. And instead let the equipment do more of the work. See if I can loosen the roots. And then maybe use a jack to help pull it loose.
 

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There is really no reason to get the graded chains unless you are using them for something highway related. The HF farm jack is rated at 8,000 pounds and HF also has a ⅜ inch by 5 foot chain with hooks that will handle most every brush removal job. Using the farm jack, you will also likely need some 2x4's to make a tripod.

 

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I used a carbide-tipped blade on my (Bosch) reciprocating saw to cut the roots on a 6" tree and that made it possible to get the rest of the tree out of the ground. It took a bit of work and I wouldn't want to do it too many times, but it did work. I haven't tried the pressure washer. The location was far from a source of water.
 

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Years ago, I bought the 3/8 grade 43 chain from HF. It was fine, but it is heavy and not that long. Last year I got the grade 70 5/16 chain. I like it a lot better. It is lighter and longer, which was good for my usage.
 
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