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AKA Moses Lawnagan
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Brief rundown for those unaware

2011 X540 K72
Deere powered sleeve hitch
I know nothing and am lost without all you guys.
related thread:

So I posed a question a few months back that I forgot about regarding where to attach a chain to my tractor for pulling out large bushes. First off, a few of these are pretty big like 10ft high so I may not even have the power. I am going to post pics in a new thread of all the ones I want to pull and let you guys debate over whether my baby can handle it.
It doesn't really matter where you attach your chain, because you ain't gonna pull large shrubs out with your garden tractor. You don't have the weight or the traction, and it takes both. I tried it with a 2520 compact and it doesn't work either. You can try with a tow strap, get a running start, but you'll only get jerked back, or pull a wheelie, or damage your machine.

You can increase your chances if you dig around the root ball and loosen up the ground really well, but digging them out by hand is just as quick, really; use a shovel and a mattock, work your way around the plant, loosening dirt and cutting the bigger roots. Then, you can probably pull up what's left in the ground.

I work with a landscaper, we revise and replace shrubbery all the time, and we dig them all up by hand. Once you get to shrubs and trees with stumps 3-4 inches in diameter and larger, it's just easier to cut them flush at the ground, and dig as close to them as possible to replant; it might mean having to cut some larger roots, but some plants have such extensive root systems (hollies are especially bad), that you'd need a D5 with a spike on back to get it out of the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Depends on whether or not you want to save the shrub and transplant it or just yank it out. I cringe when I see pics of guys pulling on ropes and straps, do it if you want, not me, I will be using grade 70 chain. Cut down the size of the shrub unless you want wacked on the head and dig around the base of the shrub to cut the roots. You may be surprised how easily they come out.
So again if I cut the the shrub to a foot high, where am I to wrap and attach the chain the shrub? I envision the chain coming up off the shrub and into the back of my head. Trying to get a visual
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Get yourself a farm jack and a short length of chain with hooks. Most farm jacks are rated around 3-4 tons. Harbor Freight has them for $60.
Dig around the root system to insert the chain and lift up.

Looks like this may be needed. I will keep this in mind, Ill have to look for videos on usage as I have no idea how to operate.
 

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My wife and I have removed small trees and very large shrubs. We cut the stuff down so only a foot or so remains above ground. Water the area thoroughly and let soak overnight. Next day take the truck and wrap a line around what's being pulled up and done and moving on. We don't mess around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Lots of answers here thanks. Unfortunately not what i wanted to hear. I do like the farm jack idea but Ill have to see how much one of those can handle.

I like the idea of the brush grubber but will currently pass as it seems my machine not up to the task for some of these. Can someone recommend a grade 70 chain? Im torn on the HF one.

Unfortunately I cant get a truck to most of them as this area is fenced in a would require a 200ft chain lol.

So I think Im going to take some pictures of these trees/shrubs and post them here, let you guys comment on the tools needed. If the farm jack would work for the big ones I can go that route, I'll post some pics tomorrow.

Thanks guys
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
My wife and I have removed small trees and very large shrubs. We cut the stuff down so only a foot or so remains above ground. Water the area thoroughly and let soak overnight. Next day take the truck and wrap a line around what's being pulled up and done and moving on. We don't mess around.

you do mention truck though and not X590
 

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We've been getting rain like crazy. I've pulled bushes and small trees up by the roots with a harbor freight winch on tractor.
I wind cable around about six times, then a 6"x6" post chocked the wheels. If there's a big tree behind tractor I'll strap back of tractor to it.

Sent from my SM-S205DL using Tapatalk
 

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Cut them down to 18"s. As shown above a #70 chain drill a hole in the shrub and put a piece of rebar through it about 6"s above the ground wrap the chain around the shrub under the rebar, use an old ax and cut as many of the roots as you can, run the chain over a steel rim and hook it to the hitch on the tractor. There are going to make you work for it for sure. I just did this last year at work with my Dodge diesel on blacktop and wow they made me work to get them out!
 

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If you're buying a 'logging' chain its should have a grab hook on one end and a slip hook on the other.
With the slip hook end you should be able to rig up a choker that holds well enough that you're not needing to drill the trunk.
Cut the trunk 3 or 4 feet high, but hook to it lower so that if rigging does start to slip, it's not popping of the top.

You want the tractor end of the rigging to below the centreline of the rear axle -- so the pull cannot flip the tractor over backwards. Perhaps not with GT's, but many have been killed by ignoring this with (small) tractors.


Hook point on the tree/shrub is a trade-off.
The higher on the trunk you can rig, the more mechanical advantage the pull has to break roots/pull the plant out. However, if it's too high, the chain tension can reduce the weight on the rear axle of tractor reducing traction.

Short chain hookup length and chain hooked at the ground will add downforce on tractor, increasing traction and increasing lift on plant -- but loosing the leverage advantage from hooking higher on the plant and loosing the safety factor from being further away from the plant.

In the early '70's dad and I pulled out a huge number of small trees and bushes with a small (30 or 40hp?) 1950's farm tractor. If you have a bunch to do, you'll soon figure out how to get a chain choker to work and the best height/hook-up length combo for the ground conditions, the size of your GT and the size/type of plants being pulled.


Hydraulics are your friend. I've done some cleanup in the yard and in fence rows over the years with a Case TLB, and have done areas measured in acres with a JD 25 ton excavator.
If I had many to do I'd be renting/borrowing a backhoe or mini-excavator. Faster and safer.

If only a few to pull and if in tight quarters a come-along is maybe another suggestion along with the jack-all-jack one.


Obviously, it makes a difference if you clearing overgrown stuff out from beside the house to prepare for new landscaping vs clearing a spot at the edge of a wooded area to build a shop or make a garden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
If you're buying a 'logging' chain its should have a grab hook on one end and a slip hook on the other.
With the slip hook end you should be able to rig up a choker that holds well enough that you're not needing to drill the trunk.
Cut the trunk 3 or 4 feet high, but hook to it lower so that if rigging does start to slip, it's not popping of the top.

You want the tractor end of the rigging to below the centreline of the rear axle -- so the pull cannot flip the tractor over backwards. Perhaps not with GT's, but many have been killed by ignoring this with (small) tractors.


Hook point on the tree/shrub is a trade-off.
The higher on the trunk you can rig, the more mechanical advantage the pull has to break roots/pull the plant out. However, if it's too high, the chain tension can reduce the weight on the rear axle of tractor reducing traction.

Short chain hookup length and chain hooked at the ground will add downforce on tractor, increasing traction and increasing lift on plant -- but loosing the leverage advantage from hooking higher on the plant and loosing the safety factor from being further away from the plant.

In the early '70's dad and I pulled out a huge number of small trees and bushes with a small (30 or 40hp?) 1950's farm tractor. If you have a bunch to do, you'll soon figure out how to get a chain choker to work and the best height/hook-up length combo for the ground conditions, the size of your GT and the size/type of plants being pulled.


Hydraulics are your friend. I've done some cleanup in the yard and in fence rows over the years with a Case TLB, and have done areas measured in acres with a JD 25 ton excavator.
If I had many to do I'd be renting/borrowing a backhoe or mini-excavator. Faster and safer.

If only a few to pull and if in tight quarters a come-along is maybe another suggestion along with the jack-all-jack one.


Obviously, it makes a difference if you clearing overgrown stuff out from beside the house to prepare for new landscaping vs clearing a spot at the edge of a wooded area to build a shop or make a garden.

This all great stuff thank you.

So as funds are tight I want to buy a single chain that can be used for other purposes. The logging chain actually looks more useful than the trucker chains I was looking at with 2 different size hooks. So maybe that's a win there, Ill check TSC and online. Ive seen the HF chain supporting massive loads but when i was at the store the links were too thick to slide on the hook, so that seems like a no go.

So i would say there are about 5-6 bushes or whatever the heck they are and i think the tractor could handle 2-3 of them. The others I doubt it, I forgot to take pictures again today dangit, swamped with work other duties.

The jackall jack seems to be the same mechanism as a farm jack yes? I might see if these are available for rental anywhere as I cant see a use case after this is done. Feel free to correct me on this, always looking for excuses to convince the Mrs.

So I've pretty much decided that digging around the base and chopping any possible roots is a must no matter the size just to be cautious. Will chopping these roots dull an axe quickly? I ask because you stated to use a dull axe, I have an 8lb maul but its brand new, Im downing trees next week and will need to split for firewood. Just wondering here. Other than that Ive plenty of spades and a pickaxe.

Thanks for the response, I'll be posting pics tomorrow, most of you are going to LOL and tell me to get a chevy 2500.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Cut them down to 18"s. As shown above a #70 chain drill a hole in the shrub and put a piece of rebar through it about 6"s above the ground wrap the chain around the shrub under the rebar, use an old ax and cut as many of the roots as you can, run the chain over a steel rim and hook it to the hitch on the tractor. There are going to make you work for it for sure. I just did this last year at work with my Dodge diesel on blacktop and wow they made me work to get them out!
the rebar is a great idea as well. thanks for tip, may try this out.
 

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Two types of hooks for chains. One is narrow that is designed to catch the individual link on the chain and not move from there. The other looks like a 'C', usually with a retaining clip on the open end that allows the chain to slip though.
I use the ⅜ inch chain from HF for all my needs around the property pulling small stumps with the farm jack, dragging logs and have used it to tow vehicles. Also have a bunch of nylon tow straps that come in handy for odd things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
So Im seriously considering this chain:


OR this one


With the ball dog plus:


One of these chains and this awesome hitch attachment are the same price as a grade 70 3/8 chain.

So internally Im wondering if 10-12ft is enough, which I would think for pulling shrubs and other things around the yard, but not sure. I usually always buy more than I need to save from future purchases but Im on a budget here, lots more implements and tools to purchase.

What do you guys think about 1/4 vs 3/8? 3/8 about twice the weight rating correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Two types of hooks for chains. One is narrow that is designed to catch the individual link on the chain and not move from there. The other looks like a 'C', usually with a retaining clip on the open end that allows the chain to slip though.
I use the ⅜ inch chain from HF for all my needs around the property pulling small stumps with the farm jack, dragging logs and have used it to tow vehicles. Also have a bunch of nylon tow straps that come in handy for odd things.
Yea i was going to buy some straps form TSC but cant figure out what I'll use them for? Seems great if theres a hook on both ends of what you're pulling...but i cant tie the other end to a log or something..Make sense? Need visual.
 

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Imho, you want one that has one 'grab hook' nd one 'slide' hook. Transport chains typically have 2 grab hooks.

You will want a slide hook for the choker end grabbing whatever you are pulling out, and the grab hook can be used to and the puller end, and can shorten the overall length as desired.

This is just a random picture, but it shows the 2 hook types.

2492718


Musta been someone else giving advice about chopping roots with an axe (but I think I'd avoid that if at all possible)
 

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It really is going to depend on the size of the vegetation you are trying to remove and the state of the soil it is in. When the soil get super saturated around here in the winter and the winds blow that can be enough to topple very large hemlock trees (60-100 ft high).

The X540 is not a big tractor. I have a CUT. Last summer I cut a small (6-7" diameter at about 5' high) alder tree and tried bending the truck over with my bucket. It withstood all my attempts with the bucket. The roots were holding it in very well. I ended up using a carbide tipped blade on my reciprocating saw to cut the substantial roots. After that, I knocked it down with my bare hands.
 
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