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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brief rundown for those unaware

2011 X540 K72
Deere powered sleeve hitch
I know nothing and am lost without all you guys.
related thread:

So I posed a question a few months back that I forgot about regarding where to attach a chain to my tractor for pulling out large bushes. First off, a few of these are pretty big like 10ft high so I may not even have the power. I am going to post pics in a new thread of all the ones I want to pull and let you guys debate over whether my baby can handle it.

But I wanted to get deeper into the specifics of the tools to be used. First off i was told to not use the tractor frame but indeed use my sleeve hitch. Now I will have 2 adapters, a sleeve to tongue adapter with placement for a ball and a sleeve to receiver adapter as Im currently purchasing a ripper/middlebuster which will require a receiver hitch. So I can place a ball on either of these and Im wondering which one to use for pulling logs and destroying nature. Im pretty keen on this product:
As it gives me peace of mind and Im terrified of a chain coming loose and whacking me in the back of the head. So in general which sleeve adapter would one use or would it matter. Could all come down to brand and the quality of said adapter? One is a johnny product, looks the other will be HH or moto alliance as of right now.

So its hard for me to research on my own when I don't know what to exactly google..So they're chains and straps yes? What are these straps specifically called and what is the use case over a chain? When i think straps, I think of ratcheting tie downs. Speaking of chains Ive seen people say it must be at least grade 70, preferably grade 80 USA. Its hard to find local USA made products anywhere. HF has grade 70 that some people have mentioned on here and had some positive comments. Others wouldn't even consider a HF chain..please discuss. I would like to get a chain local maybe big box or TSC cause I assume shipping is costly. And for the straps are these better for pulling bushes or trees? For the ball whats the most common size to purchase? I can buy others and they're not expensive but I assume there is great size that fits "most" of what I'll use it for like carts small trailers and such.

Ive also seen people mention snatch blocks but I assume that's geared for a winch? Could be wrong here.

I know there are other products aside from the tractor to do things but Id like to avoid purchasing them if I dont absolutely have to. I'll need a chain and/or straps for other things so might as well give it go.

As you can see the questions are pretty general. Once I get the terminology down and the use case for certain tools I can take off. So please discuss and argue politely amongst yourselves!

Thanks in advance as always!
 

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Large bushes are dealt with here with my 4x4 Ram pickup........
 

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I have pulled small shrubs with less than a 1" diameter trunk where it enters the ground with my X500. Anything more than that and, to paraphrase the sheriff in Jaws, "you're going to need a bigger tractor". My '73 Ford 4000, which measured 42 hp at the drawbar in the Nebraska tests, has pulled out things like larger shrubs and smaller trees up to around 2.5" in diameter, but any bigger than that and the root system is just too large for even that tractor. On anything tall, definitely cut off the majority of the top so that it doesn't fall on you if you are lucky enough to get the roots free from the ground.
 
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Some have good luck with this method.
 

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I try to dig all of the way around the shrub and cut off any peripheral roots found.

I happen to have a small shovel/bucket that mounts to my fork frame that can help with the digging, but you need access and it can only dig down so far (maybe 18" or so):

The tractor is usually able to loosen it up by pulling it back and forth. You can then pull the shrub to one side and hand cut any center roots. It usually then will lift out.

Oh, and I tend to use those woven nylon lift straps over chains.
 

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Rich
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Strap or chain - put a blanket over the chain to cover as much as possible. So if chain/strap breaks it will stop it most of the time before any serious damage. I use a moving blanket. Pulled my bushes with my Jeep. I do not pull in a steady motion, have a little slack and then use a slow motion to snap/pull using just the weight of the vehicle, not the drive train.
 

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Get yourself a farm jack and a short length of chain with hooks. Most farm jacks are rated around 3-4 tons. Harbor Freight has them for $60.
Dig around the root system to insert the chain and lift up.

 

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Depends on whether or not you want to save the shrub and transplant it or just yank it out. I cringe when I see pics of guys pulling on ropes and straps, do it if you want, not me, I will be using grade 70 chain. Cut down the size of the shrub unless you want wacked on the head and dig around the base of the shrub to cut the roots. You may be surprised how easily they come out.
 

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I use my Dodge 2500.... and a long log chain. Wrap the chain around the base of whatever it is I want to yank, secure it to my receiver hitch, hit the gas, and let off, just before the chain reaches tension. Let the weight of the truck yank it, not the drivetrain in the truck. :D Doesn't tear up the yard that way either. Two or three good yanks will pull just about anything. Roots and all.
 

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The right tool is a 'Brush Grubber'.
I have the smaller version of the one shown in this video (BG16), used it to pull several shrubs on the property using a Craftsman GT. I think the main issue when using a small tractor is pulling the shrub sideways vs. up and out. It's a challenge to pull this stuff out sideways with a GT because the root system is working against you. If you can use a wheel/rim to create some vertical leverage like the other post shows you it should work better for you.

 

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Some Tractor Supplies have them
 

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Get yourself a farm jack and a short length of chain with hooks. Most farm jacks are rated around 3-4 tons. Harbor Freight has them for $60.
Dig around the root system to insert the chain and lift up.

For newbies though - watch your chin unless you're into facial reconstruction and dental work
 

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For newbies though - watch your chin unless you're into facial reconstruction and dental work
Perhaps the best thing of the farm jack is that it is slow and easy. There is no yanking, everything just comes up smooth with each ratchet of the jack and there are no long ends flying through the air if something slips or breaks.
 

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Perhaps the best thing of the farm jack is that it is slow and easy. There is no yanking, everything just comes up smooth with each ratchet of the jack and there are no long ends flying through the air if something slips or breaks.
I've witnessed them go wrong in the offroading world. There is a LOT of force being built up in the handle when pushing down. Just keep your head out of the way
 

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This might have been said I come in late----I would say the bigest tractor they make and also the bigest chain ---HAhahahaha----I would hire it done!!!!!!! IMHO.
 

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Twenty milliliters of nitro and a 30.06. You can sight it in from the Deere, park well back.

Or... ya know, just cut 'em off flush to the ground and let the roots die.
Ditto, that's what I did 2 years ago to the row of boxwood's along our front porch. That little Echo made short order of 15 boxwood's; no more hassling with a hedge trimmer and the wife constantly saying they're not even, go back.
 

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Twenty milliliters of nitro and a 30.06. You can sight it in from the Deere, park well back.

Or... ya know, just cut 'em off flush to the ground and let the roots die.
Ya know...I'm really thinking of doing this over the spring. Tannerite is wonderful. I have a Woodchuck hole under my woodpile that I might take care of in the same manner :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Unless you have a backhoe or something to cut roots you going to have a miserable time yanking them out, also cutting the growth down to about 18'' helps alot. Maybe be you could get someone with a tree/bush spade like this:TREE SPADE, VERMEER - Broadway Rental Equipment Co
Meh, cmon now. I've seen plenty of vids of lesser tractors taking shrubs right out. I'm not saying it could everything but you're making it seem like this isn't even a possibility...

Not be rude but I think of combination of tools may work. Heck you may be right but if I need to get the majority of the root system out in order to till and throw seed down.
 
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