My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,146 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Until now I have always worn leather mitts or gloves for snow clearing and they invariably get sopping wet. Usually I have a dry pair to swap while the wet ones are laid out to dry but one pair developed holes in them so they got tossed and I hadn't gotten around to replacing them. I usually drive across the Canada/US border to Menards as the local selection is poor.

So I decided to try to buy a new pair of insulated leather gloves locally but all I could find were synthetic. I had the wife with me and she talked me into buying gloves and mitts. The synthetic material purports to keep the moisture out. I guess I must have sweated in them as it also keeps the moisture in so I had both the gloves and the mitts soaked in no time. My old leather gloves had not yet dried so I was right back where I started.

At work my gloves are always getting wet so I have extra pairs and I made myself a 12V glove dryer that I keep in my truck. The 12V dryer only blows air, no heat to dry the gloves. I prefer to dry leather slowly without heat.

I decided I will need a dryer at home too and found a good deal at Menards so picked one up. There is not a lot to choose from either locally or across and very little description of how they work WRT heat/no heat. I got the following one that does not have a no heat option.
2443065


Just my luck the first one I got was defective as the fan would keep cutting out. I went online to check reviews and there was a common problem where the elastic cuffs on the gloves/mitts won't let the air circulate and a thermal safety shuts it off. I fiddled around with tubes to hold the cuffs to allow air but the fan would still cut out. After close observation I determined that it was only the fan cutting out at first, not the heating element but of course without airflow the thermal safety would trip, so I returned it and exchanged it for a new one.

Knowing that the elastic cuff would still prevent air flow, I added permanent tubes to let the air out. It works great now but still there is not a no heat option. I looked at the circuitry to see if I could modify it to have a fan-only mode but it is a cheap-and-dirty circuit whereby the fan is 12V DC and they tap into the heater element to get 12V AC that then gets rectified to DC. Bugger! Had I known that, I would have bought this model for my truck rather than build one from parts.

Some day I will probably wire a 12V DC jack and use an external 12V DC power supply so I can use it to dry leather gloves and boots without heat.
 

·
..
Joined
·
10,395 Posts
I’ve tried mink oil on leather gloves, slight improvement. Tried spray on waterproofing, slightly better results.
I’ve resigned myself to having 3 pairs of work gloves when it gets cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,146 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Back when I used to do Winter work on pipeline construction, Dubbin was my friend and of course extra pairs to swap.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,246 Posts
I use to drive an oil truck years ago I used gloves that were oil proof kind of a rubbery outside material and had a cloth kind of a cotton material lining in them...they kept your hands warm and dry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,146 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Back in 1982 I worked 23 hour days, 7 days a week in the dead of Winter on a fuel oil truck on the pipeline. I too wore insulated oil resistant rubber gloves but the lining was synthetic, not cotton.

It was a crazy hectic pace racing from one machine to another before it ran out of fuel. If I didn't get to a machine in time, I would have to spend time I couldn't spare bleeding the injectors to get it running again and then race to the next machine hoping it didn't also run out of fuel. It was not fun bleeding injectors in -40 temps with bare fingers soaked in fuel.

Some idiot operators would park the equipment on such a stupid angle that I could not fill both tanks as one tank was lower than the other. If they ran out of fuel, I didn't bother bleeding the injectors and just moved on to the next one. Let the idiot learn his lesson and park it level next time.

Where I work now we have a fleet of vac trucks and steam/hot water pressure wash trucks so working with water. Rubber gloves will get wet on the inside from sweating. Leather gloves breathe but the hot pressure washer hose gets wet from laying in snow and invariably wet the gloves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,146 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
At work my gloves are always getting wet so I have extra pairs and I made myself a 12V glove dryer that I keep in my truck. The 12V dryer only blows air, no heat to dry the gloves....
My home made 12V dryer I keep in the truck packed it in. It failed once before which turned out to be a broken wire solder connection. As the blower was not made to be taken apart I had to cut it apart to fix the solder joint. Over time it was getting really noisy and so I oiled the one bearing that I could get at but it would have taken a lot of cutting and re-gluing to get at the other end. Anyway... the bearings finally disintegrated and the noise became intolerable. It got to where I would only run the fan when I left the cab but today it died on me.

When I got back to the yard from my run, I went dumpster diving in our e-waste bin and found some really good quality squirrel-cage 12V fans. It didn't take much effort to marry one up to my DIY glove dryer. This fan moves a lot of air and is super quiet. It looks like it is made to last and I have a spare (there were 2 in the chassis) but I might dive back in and grab a couple more.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top