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MIG/Fluxcore settings are in volts. The two main settings are volts and wire-speed. Amps are kind of behind the scenes in MIG.

As previously stated, I'm not a welder by trade so I'll stop before I embarrass myself too much. ;)
well let me help u.. I was a certified welder at my former work place.. it takes 21 volts to make an arc in a reg mig welder.. we had dials on our machines.. I have yet to see a pic of the OP machine..


at my former work place we used 95-5 gas.. flux-core is funny to weld with.. to get a good weld we had to make the welder tip go over the weld.. also the angle of the wire to the weld was also a factor..

weldin down hill was a art.. u had to go the right speed to keep ur puddle from going around ur wire..

Patrice on scrap metal to make ur weldin good..
 

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MIG/Fluxcore settings are in volts. The two main settings are volts and wire-speed. Amps are kind of behind the scenes in MIG.

As previously stated, I'm not a welder by trade so I'll stop before I embarrass myself too much. ;)
:sidelaugh

funny thing is you are correct.

I want to see his control board on his welder and then i can give him more advixe.
 

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How much stick-out also makes a difference with heat buildup (ie, how far the tip of the gun is away from where you are welding). Closer/less stickout == hotter IIRC.
I thought more stickout (further away) made it hotter? My apologies if I had that wrong. Too-far away and you'll have other problems, though.
 

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It'll hurt like ****, but some "super glue" on a cut works great. ( in the winter when my fingers crack and split, I glue them up too)
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
Bought some stuff called "2nd skin" and it burnt like heck when applied, did ok for a day and then wore off. Not an issue now, it has closed enough that I can use it.

So, 2nd job today with the welder and even though not a huge issue, makes me glad I bought it. Had a rounded bolt on the middle spindle of the mower deck and couldn't get it off. Ground down a bolt the same size and welded it on the other bolt head and the bolt came right out of the deck. Put the new blade on and new bolt and it was off to the races. Maybe a pretty expensive "bolt extractor" but it worked where a couple of other removers I bought wouldn't!

I did notice that while welding this bolt on since it was thick and the other bolt head thick I cranked the welder and wire feeder up pretty good (7 and 6 respectively) and got the "frying bacon" sound that I hear on all the welding videos. It did produce a strong weld too so I'd say that at least now I know that sound when the MiG is doing a good bead.

So here is the faceplace (image from the web) and for the 16 guage both knobs were turned almost all the way down.
 

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Ok so you don't have "switches" like my old Campbell Huasefield. You can directly control the heat.

YES heat knob goes with the metal thickness. All the way down was not what you needed for what you did. I would say a 3-4 on the heat with short burns for what you were working on. Now, feeds speed does not have to change much, and I think you had your feed speed too low. You can under power the feed even on thin stuff. The popping can be caused by not enough feed or too much. The thin stuff, low/med heat and a 3 on the feed with short burns should give you a good melt.

It's really hard to explain on the net. I hope you understand what I'm saying. Just keep trying on stuff. Right now a grinder is your friend. LOL. you will get it.
Good luck
Tony
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Thanks Tony, I'll try that when I get some more steel to play with. I bought some more grinder wheels as I suspect I'll be using a few.
 

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Thanks Tony, I'll try that when I get some more steel to play with. I bought some more grinder wheels as I suspect I'll be using a few.
You are welcome buddy. Just trying to help, but it's hard on the net. If you were closer I'd come over and show you. LOL......... I don't think a 5hr drive is in the mix of that though. :tango_face_wink:

Just keep trying and testing on different thickness metals. You will figure it out.

One thing to remember is that the feed speed DOES NOT follow the heat knob, number for number. I have NEVER gotten my flux core feed speed above 5/6 and it has never gone below 2. it stays right around 3/4 and I use the heat and movement to make things work. You will know if you have too much feed or not enough. You will see and feel the gun jump when there is too much feed and you will see the wire disappear when there is not enough for the heat.

Good luck my friend. :thThumbsU
 

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Hey Tim, don't know if the Vulcan has this by my Hobart does. Look on the inside of the flip up side and there is probably a chart that gives you some representative settings re: speed and heat, to get you in the ball park. Doesn't take long to fine tune cause you see the results immediately.
And yes a grinder is your friend. I do more cleaning with a grinding wheel that a wire wheel, mainly cause I've got a whole lot of rusty crap that I'm always working on.
MikeC
 

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My Lincoln has one of those gauge and settings charts on the inside. Since I don't have enough experience, I go by what that chart says :)

Mine has different settings for different wire diameters, for flux vs gas, and for different types of gas. Mine lists it by sheetmetal gauge. So I also have a printout of gauge vs actual steel thickness. Then I check with my calipers, figure out the gauge, then refer to the welder's chart.

Some people talk about dialing in the feed speed while actually welding. I'm not nearly good enough to try that, so I set it by the chart, and leave it alone.

And yeah, I love figuring out things I can do with mine. I've used it to repair things that would have been almost impossible otherwise (or at least would have been much less robust). I've had mixed success when using it to remove twisted-off fasteners in machinery, but some people say they work great for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Yes it has the chart inside and comes with a gauge/mm wheel to figure out how thick the steel is. The chart says I can't weld 16 gauge with flux core....I beg to differ, in the hands of a novice it will weld, not sure how well, but it is stuck together!

Supposed to be reasonable outside tomorrow, overcast but no rain, hoping to do some chipping in the morning until grass dries and then finish mowing the lawn.
 

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Curious, is it saying you can't weld something as thick as 16-gauge, or as thin as 16-gauge?

The rule of thumb I've read is 1 amp per 0.001" of steel thickness. So my 140A welder can handle 1/8" thick, or a little over. With flux-core, with proper preparation, and with multiple passes, you can go thicker, though it sounds like sometimes the companies get a bit optimistic with what they say can be done, at least on the 110V-powered units like mine.

A risk I've read is that MIG welds might *look* OK on the surface, but don't have good depth penetration, so they can be weak. Personally, I'm not buying anyone's homemade trailer off Craigslist. In rare cases where I've used mine on extra-thick materials, it was when I knew there was no risk if a weld were to fail.

I spent a while using mine yesterday, welding a patch over a big rusted-through area of my tractor's mower deck. The welds aren't pretty, but I think they'll hold.

In the process, I discovered that the battery in my black w/blue-flames Harbor Freight auto-darkening helmet had died, and it would take too-long to darken. Not good. The batteries are not replaceable, so I started looking online at helmets with replaceable batteries. Then I realized I needed to keep making progress on my little project, so I opened up my helmet's guts, ripped off the dead cell, and put in a CR2032. That was enough to get it going again, at least, and I kept welding. Either I'll do a better job setting up this helmet for replacement batteries, or maybe I'll order something better, but at least I got it working again for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Well I read the chart at the 18 guage instead of 16, but here is the chart on the Vulcan and the guage they send so you know what size metal you are working with.
 

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not quins. but sextuplets
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I have a HF helmet.. I can turn it off too when not in use.. it has flames on it.. check ur dial..
 

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That gauge is pretty cool, that would be handy to have available.

Good point about turning off the helmet. If I set the knob to Grind, it clicks, and that probably does a better job of powering it down.

With that said, it's 7 years old, so I don't want to give the impression that it died quickly. If it was "really" powered up too-much, when I left it sitting ready to use, I'd guess it would have gone dead much sooner. I should check the manual and see what it says.

At this point, if I can make the batteries easy to replace, I might just leave it "on" anyhow. If they'll last ~5 years anyhow, I'd rather it always be ready to work, rather than me forgetting to turn it on sometime and flashing myself.
 

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not quins. but sextuplets
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That gauge is pretty cool, that would be handy to have available.

Good point about turning off the helmet. If I set the knob to Grind, it clicks, and that probably does a better job of powering it down.

With that said, it's 7 years old, so I don't want to give the impression that it died quickly. If it was "really" powered up too-much, when I left it sitting ready to use, I'd guess it would have gone dead much sooner. I should check the manual and see what it says.

At this point, if I can make the batteries easy to replace, I might just leave it "on" anyhow. If they'll last ~5 years anyhow, I'd rather it always be ready to work, rather than me forgetting to turn it on sometime and flashing myself.
on the outside of where the helmet is stored I wrote a note...… did u turn the helmet OFF...…. I find myself double checkin that,,,,,,,,
 

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My friend has had to buy three of those self darkening masks ,one was a Snap-On that cost him $150 ,and looks almost identical to the $40 one he got at Harbor Freight..

He had to replace them because they have "sealed batteries" that are recharged by sunlight (solar panel I guess?)--and attempts to open up the container the battery & "guts" are mounted in resulted in destruction..

He is looking for a mask that has replaceable batteries like his first one that used 2 "AA" batteries,that mask lasted him 5+ years and he only had to put in new batteries a few times..eventually it started failing to darken quickly enough,then one day it went black and that was all she wrote..

I like the self darkening masks but don't own one yet--I have borrowed his a few times and I am much better at striking an arc in the right spot with his mask than my old school ones that leave you guessing where the rod is until an arc strikes,and you find your at least an inch off from where you wanted to weld..
 

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I was going to buy the Antra AH7-360, it uses replaceable button cell batteries. $50, the reviews seemed pretty good.

From what I read about my Harbor Freight, the solar panel does not actually charger the batteries. They are not rechargeable-type cells, and they eventually died, despite it being stored in the sun.

Antra Welding Helmet Auto Darkening AH7-360-0000, Dual Power Solar+ Battery, Wide Shade Range 4/5-9/9-13 with Grinding, 6+1 Extra Lens Covers, Stable for TIG MIG MMA Plasma https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EL6N294/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_.VqcDbT3STXJR
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Well got to use the replaced Vulcan MiG 140 today for a bit of heavier welding. Obviously not perfect but looks like I got decent laydown and good penetration, have some of them I'm sure I'll have to redo though soon:


2457505
2457506


2457507
2457508



2457509
 

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Clean metal is your friend any pain near where you are welding burns and causes problems. you are getting better for sure.
 
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