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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I've got a Murray GT (model 46431X92A). I pull a 44" Swisher trailmower with it, and I've found that when going up some of the hills here on my property, if I'm going through a thick bunch of grass, I'll wind up spinning the tires on my tractor. Or just one tire, usually--the other one remains stationary.

I'm trying to decide what to do to increase the traction so I spend less time backing up to get "unstuck." One other annoying thing is that I would like to go real slow over the thick spots, but the slower I go the more likely I am to get stuck. If I've got a little momentum I am more likely to make it up the hill. These are not steep hills, mind you. But the thickness of the grass makes it tough for my little GT to pull it up even that gentle hill.

So, I think the two options I've got are wheel weights and tire chains. I have no idea which would be preferable... what are the advantages/disadvantages of wheel weights and tire chains? Is one more likely to work in my situation?

I'm also planning to use this little GT to grade my gravel driveway. I figured I'll need some better traction for that as well.

-Josh
 

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I recommend ag tires and wheel weights or loaded tires. Some here will tell you to use chains but I reserve them for snow and ice. I've used them to pull heavy loads up hills and they can and will tear up the yard quick in some conditons. Spinning a chained tire in wet conditions will dig 1/2 way to China in a heartbeat. Part time like I've done for moving something heavy is one thing but for day in day out get the ags or HDAP tires and some weight and forget about traction problems.
 

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I recommend ag tires and wheel weights or loaded tires. Some here will tell you to use chains but I reserve them for snow and ice. I've used them to pull heavy loads up hills and they can and will tear up the yard quick in some conditons. Spinning a chained tire in wet conditions will dig 1/2 way to China in a heartbeat. Part time like I've done for moving something heavy is one thing but for day in day out get the ags or HDAP tires and some weight and forget about traction problems.
:ditto:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I recommend ag tires and wheel weights or loaded tires. Some here will tell you to use chains but I reserve them for snow and ice. I've used them to pull heavy loads up hills and they can and will tear up the yard quick in some conditons. Spinning a chained tire in wet conditions will dig 1/2 way to China in a heartbeat. Part time like I've done for moving something heavy is one thing but for day in day out get the ags or HDAP tires and some weight and forget about traction problems.
Loaded tires = fluid filled tires?

Can I fill my existing tires with fluid or do you need special tires to be able to fill them with fluid?
 

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Also with chains,they will scar up and have no traction on pavement.

I went down my dads driveway with chains on my old Craftsman (not knowing any better) and it scared my spitless,I was prolly doin 20mph when I got to the bottom and it was wanting to fishtail.
 

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Loaded tires = fluid filled tires?

Can I fill my existing tires with fluid or do you need special tires to be able to fill them with fluid?
No you can fill the tires you have.
 

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Fluid in the tires will also give better stability on hills as it is the lowest weight, for center of gravity purposes, that you can install. Wheel weights are the next best and have the advantage that they can be removed when necessary.

I load the tires on my heavy tractors with the heaviest fluid available (RimGuard) and my grasscutter is going to get the same if it keeps ticking me off when mowing the ditch.

Find a Rim Guard dealer. It's close to being the cheapest weight per pound that you can add to a tractor.

Bob :rauch10:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do I have to take my tractor to a shop or how can I get fluid in the tires? I've never put anything besides air in a tire, forgive my ignorance on how you would do this.
 

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For Rim Guard, find a shop that deals with it, a tire shop that deals with heavy equipment or farm tractor dealer. That will get you the most weight. Plumbing antifreeze you can add yourself by breaking the bead on one side of the tire and pouring it in. Depending on tire size, that may take up to 6 or 7 gallons each tire. Antifreeze is quite a bit lighter than Rim Guard per gallon.

I prefer the max weight for my tractors. Leaving any resulting mess at someone elses shop is a bonus.

Bob :rauch10:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Any idea what I should expect it to cost me to have a shop put Rim Guard in my tires? I'm figuring I only need it in the rear (drive) tires, so two tires. The Murray part number is 407920, and searching for that number I've found my tire described as a 23X9.50-12 SE. I mentioned that because I'm assuming the volume of the tire is going to weigh in (no pun intended) on the cost to fill it with Rim Guard.
 

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I would still consider ag tires. I'm not sure weighing down turf tires is going to give you the traction you need. Chains are great for winter but bad on turf. As mentioned before they are very nice for digging ruts though!
 

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I have to say I think that having enough weight on the rear axle makes a huge diffrence. I have a snow plow on my little White L-12 and I had a heck of a time plowing even with chains, so I made a weight tray and lost the chains and had no more problems plowing even when we had 18-20" of snow. I have the standard turf tires and about 100-125lbs hanging out 1ft out behind the axle.
 

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A wight tray is great, as you can add/remove at will. The downside is it adds loading to axle and axle bearings. Wheel weights or fluid filled tires are great because it does not add load to the axle or bearings, lowers the center of gravity ( a good thing when negotiating hills). The down side is they're a always on unless you have two sets of tires. One set with fluid, one set without. But then you have to switch when needing traction for the heavy load or thick grass. Chains are good, but work best when used in conjunction with weighted tractor. (On tractor or in tires). As for chains scaring grass, they sure will!! But, that's true only if you spin the tire. The fact of the chain gripping better raises the inability for the wheel to slip. From that aspect, chains work great, too. I run fluid filled AG's w/cast weights plus V-bar chains year round on one tractor, and fluid filled turfs with V-bar chains on that year round. It's pretty hilly here and I need all the traction I can get. There are no marks in the 'grass' when using either machine. However, my wife has a smaller green machine with a deck on it and has turf tires with no added weights, fluid or chains. It's easy to spin the tires unexpectedly and is the ONLY one to get mired in the softer ground near the stream! Even though it weighs maybe half of the other two tractors!
Your mileage may vary....
 

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RimGuard costs something in the neighbourhood of $3-4 per gallon, installed. You'll need about 7 gallons for each of your rear tires, maybe 8 if you're lucky. It weighs about 4 lb. per gallon more than antifreeze, I think someone wrote that it was 11 lb. per gallon which puts it close to calcium, which you definitely do not want. Ask me why.

Like mrcaptainbob, I run chains year round on my 2400 lb. MF1655 with no detrimental effect to the grass. I second his comment on axle loading as well.

Bob :rauch10:
 

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The calcium will corrode the steel wheels in about 12-14 years. I'm getting a set of fresh wheels ready for my MF1655 for the second time. I've owned the tractor and had calcium in the tires since January 1982. The first set died in '96 and the second set 2 years ago. Since I had just bought a new MF GC2310 in '06, I've not been in a rush for the new wheels, but I do want my heavy lifter back in service.

RimGuard or the Canadian equivalent was not available to me in '96, but it is now. That's what is in my 2310. I'm just not sure how it measures up to the calcium for weight. Calcium gave me 160 lb. per tire and I'm curious as to whether the new stuff will match that weight. My tires are 26x12-12's, the same on both tractors, I just never got around to weighing the new ones. The tires and rims weigh 38 lb., so that's knocking on the door of 200 lb. per tire, plus 15 lb. of chains, so the rear tires alone weigh as much as some of these new lawn tractors.

The FEL on my 1655 sports a 210 lb. bucket and it will easily lift and transport 1000 lb. in the bucket. That's why getting the most weight in the tires is important to me. Pulling cars out of snowbanks with it is just a bonus.

Hopefully, I won't be going through this again in 12 years, when I'm 76, and the tractor is 45.

Bob :rauch10:
 

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jbeall Our first 2 GT's had filled tires and wheel weights and chains. On our last 2 GT's we just used chains alone and found we got struck way less often while still keeping maximum traction to pull a wood wagon.

We keep the chains tight and every vehicle has extra monkey links and chain straps in case one breaks or works loose.

Do yourself a favor and try some 'good' chains...you can always escalate if they fail to deliver.
 

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I will echo others here... First fluid fill the tires and see how it mows. If you need more traction, go for wheel weights. The next step would be a set of AG's.... and if for some reason you STILL need more, make or buy a set of center ring chains like they run on skidders. I highly doubt you would ever get to that step. I would keep the chains just for snow removal... BTW, first you really need to look at what you are driving on... If you have a lot of hills, side ditches or wet areas, I would start off with loaded AG's and then wheel weights if more is needed.
Only run enough weight to do the job... Running way too much weight is not good for the tractor either.
 

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my opinion is, weight is better. if you plan on using this tractor on any pavement, forget chains I found in all condition straight unweighted turfs do better than weighted tires with chains.

on softer surfaces that chains can "sink into" they work great until they start to dig


I have 70lbs on each rear tire on my SS12 and never lost traction, even pulling some stumps(4-5inch).


Ag's are expansive so should be tried after weight and with weight.
 

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Calcium is SALT. Ever see a car like from Up-State NY were they use tons of it on the roads. Solid RUST. It will rust out your rims in time
 
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