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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I have my first vegetable garden in, it's about 30'x45' - I'm realizing how stupidly ambitious I was but I'm having fun. It was tilled up last Saturday, it's Wednesday now and I'm seeing a bit of grass growth. I've asked local agriculturally inclined friends what I need to do to help me with grass and weeds, and I've hit a dead end.

I was told to get something with treflurilin or treflan in it. For the life of me, I'm not seeing any treatments with either of those chemicals. I might be walking right by them. I'm in Oklahoma, does anyone know of what brand I need to buy and how much?

So far my intentions are to plant tomatoes, peppers of many varieties, eggplant, cucumbers, crenshaw melons, possibly some blackberries, tons of onions, a few other random things, and then in a corner of the garden, some garlic, horseradish, asparagus, and possibly an attempt at some shallots (unlikely this year, I have enough to do already) in this garden. So I want something that won't kill what I'm planting.

I'm not horribly concerned about chemicals as long as they're mundane and harmless if a dog gets into the garden and goes to town.
 

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Treflan is a brand name of trifluralin, It is a pre-emergent herbicide, meaning that it is applied to kill weeds before crops appear. As with all herbicides, Treflan is a poison and should be applied with careful attention to the directions on the manufacturer's label. After applying treflan you should wait a month before planting. You have to read the lables to see if they contain trifluralin, A popular brand to use is HI-Yield.
 

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I'm glad I asked on here - I have stuff in the ground now so Treflan would have been a bad idea. What else can I use? I've had someone suggest just getting a great deal of mulch rather than using a chemical.
 

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I go as organic as possible in my garden, growing my own safer food at home for my family is the primary reason I got into gardening. So as a result the less chems the better.
Back to your topic. First congrats on your entry into growing your own. You will be fighting weeds and grass alot the first year until you get your ground established. If you want to go as organic as possible there are two methods that really work for me, the first is to go "old school"and culitvate, this is the way farmers did it before the advent of modern herbicides (i.e roundup, etc.).
I do this with my john deere M, and a set of cultivaters.....with a small garden you can do it easily by setting your rows to be a little wider than your tiller (Maybe 8-12" wider depending on the crop planted) set your tiller side shields all the way up, and your depth stake to its shallowest setting. Your not trying to till deep only loosen the surface dirt, and keeps weeds from establishing themselves (and stealing your crops nutrients). With tall plants like corn or bush beans you will only need to do this a few times until the plant height shade out the ground, making it too shady for weeds to grow. Keeping the side shields up will fling dirt into your rows helping to cover weeds in the rows (don't worry about getting soil on your veggies they will spring thru). BTW this only works with a rear tine tiller, as they can be driven in a straight line. Front tine tillers will wander all over the place, dig up your hard planted crops, and leave you feeling like you were wrestling a mountain gorrilla.:banghead3. Another thing that works really well is corn gluten. This only a preemergence though but it does work really well (I have personally used this on one of my smaller gardens with great sucess). First you would go thru your garden with a hand cultivater, or hoe. and scratch up all the weeds. Then go thru and sprinkle corn gluten or preen all over the surface of the ground. Periodically you may need to pick out the individual weeds, before they spread, but (in my experience) the weeds will only be 100th of the way they were before.

This is certainly, not the only methods but a fews thing to think about. Goodluck:goodl:
 

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like NJdeerefan: I grow a garden to keep the chemicals out of what I eat.
I collect all my grass clippings and mulch the garden with them.
I have over an acre of lawn so I can create a lot of mulch. I have almost 9 acres and am planting more of it in grass to create even more mulch.
The mulch helps hold moisture, smothers most weeds and those left are in damp ground so pull easily. It is tilled in in the fall to add organic material to the garden.
 

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I pull the weeds in my garden and feed them to the rabbits.
 

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smithrngr, I should have said when you finish applying Treflan, thoroughly mix the top two to three inches of soil. Use a rotary cultivator for best results. If you don't have one, irrigate the soil ¼ to ½ inch deep. Plant vegetables any time up to a month after you apply Treflan, Don't apply directly to crops, This is according to the agricultural extension service of the University of Maryland.
 
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