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I have my own water well. We had it drilled when we built the house in the fall of 1998.

The pressure tank that is on it is rather large and obtrusive, galvanized monstrosity (I was told that it has a capacity of 150 gallons. It is about 6' tall and 20" in diameter). The current plumbing configuration has a pipe (1½", I believe) coming from the well head into the front of the pressure tank (about 18" above ground level) with the pressure switch on this line. There is a pressure guage in the front of the tank (about mid-way up the tank) as well. Out the back side of the tank (about 3" above ground) is another 1½" pipe with a valve in it, that has a 90° elbow on it, taking it below ground and into the house.

The pressure tanks that are currently for sale in the DIY stores (Lowes, Home Depot and Tractor Supply) are different 'beasts'. They are generally smaller (considerably smaller) and painted, rather than galvanized. But... the plumbing diagrams that I've seen for them are where the real difference is. What I see for plumbing of these is that the pipe from the well head goes directly underground and to the house... after passing through a 'T' union that takes a 'sample' into the pressure tank (the pressure switch and pressure guage seem to be on this 'sampling line' that goes into the pressure tank).

What I'm hoping for is someone who is familiar with both of these systems that can confirm what I'm seeing (and outlining here) so that I don't really screw something up.

I appreciate the help....

BTW... incidental notes... we don't have a frost line here... at all. And don't normally have to really concern ourselves with frozen pipes, either. Boiling the water in the pipes is a bit more of a concern, though (LOL :sidelaugh)
 

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So are you saying you galvanized monstrosity is outside ? I had a galvanized inside and replaced it with the smaller new style.

No 'sampling line' Just a pipe from the well head to the inside of the house, check vavle, pressure switch, gage and into the tank.
 

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Sounds like you are wanting to replace your Galvanized pressure tank with a Bladder type tank.

Most of the Bladder type tanks that I have saw are just "Tee'd" into the line between the well and the home.
 

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Steve,
Sounds like you have an older style pressure tank.
Was there a reason the original tank was so big? :eek:mg: Large water usage for the outbuildings or garden?
On my house, the tank is about a 20/25 gallon with the tee fitting and I feed our horse barn 100' away with no problems.
The tee fittings work on the principle of filling tank and supplying at same time (if needed), usually 35-45 PSI supply pressure.
WHen tank is full at that pressure, pump kicks off and the tank then supplies water to the house, etc.
Here's link to Amtrol website that has explanations of how they work.
http://www.amtrol.com/wellxtrol.htm
I think it would be some minor piping changes to your system so you could connect to the supply tee.
Hope it helps you out.
 

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I think it is the "bladder style" that allows the smaller tank sizes. (I am guessing that the galvanized tank does not have a bladder seperating the water and air, so a larger tank was needed to deal with some water absorption of the air? I recall my grandpa having a much larger galvanized tank in comparison to the smaller bladder tank now there..) I'm sure you've seen that the tank size is based on number of plumbing "outlets" (sinks/toilets..)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Let's see...

So are you saying you galvanized monstrosity is outside ?
Yep. My pressure tank is outside. Here in southeast Texas (just north of Houston) freezing is an almost unheard of anomaly.

Sounds like you are wanting to replace your Galvanized pressure tank with a Bladder type tank.

Most of the Bladder type tanks that I have saw are just "Tee'd" into the line between the well and the home.
Yes. I *think* that's what I want to do... and the 'Tee'd' configuration is kinda what I'm seeing on the store displays

Steve,
Sounds like you have an older style pressure tank.
Was there a reason the original tank was so big? :eek:mg: Large water usage for the outbuildings or garden?
Yes. We have an 'oversized' (2hp) pump to accomodate the outbuildings.
Thanks for the link, by the way... I'll take a look at that.
And the minor plumbing changes are kind of what I'm seeing/thinking. I'm OK with doing that (I'm not a plumber... I don't play one on TV... shoot, I didn't even spend the night at a Holiday Inn Express, but... I think that I can successfully stick some PVC together).

I think it is the "bladder style" that allows the smaller tank sizes. (I am guessing that the galvanized tank does not have a bladder seperating the water and air, so a larger tank was needed to deal with some water absorption of the air?
I understand (and agree with) that logic, but... I was under the assumption (there's that word 'assume' you know what they say about that :hide:) that my big ole galvanized tank was a bladder tank, but... maybe not.

Thanks guys.

I appreciate the input.
 

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your current setup will have an air admittance valve(or similar device though may be called somethign else) to put air into the tank. remember, water is NOT compressable so to get pressure it must have an air pocket. the new bladder style tanks do not require this since there is a precharged bladder to exert the pressure. when my old tank went kaput, i put in a new bladder style and i did not remove the AAV. the problem is now every time just before the pump cycles on i get a burst of air in teh lines. this can be from just a few bubbles in teh stream to literally nothing but air coming out for a few seconds! since i only use it to water the garden and fill the horse trough, i live with it for now. but sooner or later i will have to pull teh pump and remove the AAV. mine is located down in teh well and sucks air thru the pipe the wires go down. many are located up top though and easily removed.

teh way to tell if it is a bladder tank or not is look for a Schrader valve(valve stem like on a tire). if it has one, you add air there to precharge the bladder. if it does not, it is an old style tank.

if you do not require that large tank to keep teh runtime down on the pump, then you should be able to get a 25-30 gallon tank and be fine. just remember that the pump will run more often.

it depends on your layout as to how easy the changeover between tank types would be.
 

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I was of the idea that with those large tanks was that you have the ability to keep large stream of water at constant pressure. As my father said on his. He wanted to be able to shoot a stream of water completely over his house.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
your current setup will have an air admittance valve(or similar device though may be called somethign else) to put air into the tank.
The air admittance valve is in the line between the well head and the pressure tank (I THINK that it's between the pressure switch and the tank, but wouldn't swear to it). There is no air admittance valve on the tank.

I appreciate all the input...

Don't know if I'll work at it this weekend, or put it off a bit longer, but... I guess I'll see about getting me a new tank and get it put on there.

I think that I'm now armed with the knowledge to make me dangerous... :hide:
 

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i wish i could find an affordable old style tank. i would give up the new one in a heart beat or just plumb it in as a second tank to increase volume before the pump has to kick in. teh local well company was supposed to order me one, but after 4 months of waiting i gave up and went to lowe's!
 

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I have my own water well. We had it drilled when we built the house in the fall of 1998.

The pressure tank that is on it is rather large and obtrusive, galvanized monstrosity (I was told that it has a capacity of 150 gallons. It is about 6' tall and 20" in diameter). The current plumbing configuration has a pipe (1½", I believe) coming from the well head into the front of the pressure tank (about 18" above ground level) with the pressure switch on this line. There is a pressure guage in the front of the tank (about mid-way up the tank) as well. Out the back side of the tank (about 3" above ground) is another 1½" pipe with a valve in it, that has a 90° elbow on it, taking it below ground and into the house.

The pressure tanks that are currently for sale in the DIY stores (Lowes, Home Depot and Tractor Supply) are different 'beasts'. They are generally smaller (considerably smaller) and painted, rather than galvanized. But... the plumbing diagrams that I've seen for them are where the real difference is. What I see for plumbing of these is that the pipe from the well head goes directly underground and to the house... after passing through a 'T' union that takes a 'sample' into the pressure tank (the pressure switch and pressure guage seem to be on this 'sampling line' that goes into the pressure tank).

What I'm hoping for is someone who is familiar with both of these systems that can confirm what I'm seeing (and outlining here) so that I don't really screw something up.

I appreciate the help....

BTW... incidental notes... we don't have a frost line here... at all. And don't normally have to really concern ourselves with frozen pipes, either. Boiling the water in the pipes is a bit more of a concern, though (LOL :sidelaugh)[/QUOTE
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I have one of each on two separate wells; galvanized and bladder (not diaphragm). I have no experience with diaphragm tanks although the connections are the same as the bladder tanks for home owner use.

If your galvanized tank is a hot dipped tank I suggest you keep it. I'm on my third bladder tank in 25 years while the galvanized tank of 35 years is still doing its thing. Sure it gets water logged over a period of time but that's easy to take care of as long as planet earth has atmospheric air.

Oh, and just try moving a bladder tank out of a well house that is full of water and won't drain out of the disconnected pipe. Not fun at all in an awkward location.
 

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A galvanized pressure tank with NO BLADDER will have an Air Volume Control (AVC). Located a few feet below the well head in the vertical pipe will be an automatic valve that will let air into the tank. (I think the way this valve works is when the pump kicks off a portion of water will bleed out of the pipe and fill with air, when the pump starts this air will go into the tank.) on the back of the tank is another valve (snifter valve) this lets excess air out of the tank (I think).

If you replace the BLADDERLESS tank with a bladertype tank, I believe the valve on the well pipe must be removed, otherwise you will end up with air on the water side of the blader.

You should be able to get the info you need of the net
 

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wow, i didn't realize how un-complicated my well setup is. I have a dug well, dug in 1890, and it's stone lined. it's shallow, only about 20 feet from ground level to bottom, and it's about 5 feet in diameter. I'd say the water level has about 15 feet of water. it's an artesian well, always filling up if you don't use it. there is an overflow pipe which lets it spill into my brook, which is about 30 feet away from it.

my well is 150 feet from my house, and has a very basic suction line with a strainer in the well cavity. the line is that flexible abs/pvc crap, about 1 1/4 " in diameter. it goes into my cellar, and directly, with no Tee business into the inlet of a 2hp Jet pump. the pump's outlet is connected to a 25 gallon bladder tank, and then into the mainframe of my house from there. we have steady water all the time, and although the well is old, we never have to do any maintenance on it, and it always tests perfect.

maybe it's different with a drilled well and the pump down in it?
 

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Steve,

Give me a call. I'm not sure I understand your problem. One thing I have to do occasionally is pump some air into the galvanized tank with an air compressor. They can get waterlogged (most of the air is gone) over time. The bladder type tank is better IMO but the galvanized tanks last forever and work OK as well.
Ed Fulton
 

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the main reason for the tanks in home plumbing is to help dampen the pressure surges when the pump turns on and to provide pressureized water right away rather than waiting for the pump to build up pressure. the system works basically the same as the charging system on a car/tractor think of the pump as an alternator and the tank as the battery. the battery is there to provide power when the alternator cant and it also acts like a voltage buffer for when the alternator output varies. so back to the water the tank will hold pressureized water until a faucet is turned on then as tank pressure drops the pump kicks on and runs until after the water is turned off and the pressure in the system is back to the cutoff point.
 

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i hope that doesnt confuse anybody
 

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wow, i didn't realize how un-complicated my well setup is. I have a dug well, dug in 1890, and it's stone lined. it's shallow, only about 20 feet from ground level to bottom, and it's about 5 feet in diameter. I'd say the water level has about 15 feet of water. it's an artesian well, always filling up if you don't use it. there is an overflow pipe which lets it spill into my brook, which is about 30 feet away from it.

my well is 150 feet from my house, and has a very basic suction line with a strainer in the well cavity. the line is that flexible abs/pvc crap, about 1 1/4 " in diameter. it goes into my cellar, and directly, with no Tee business into the inlet of a 2hp Jet pump. the pump's outlet is connected to a 25 gallon bladder tank, and then into the mainframe of my house from there. we have steady water all the time, and although the well is old, we never have to do any maintenance on it, and it always tests perfect.

maybe it's different with a drilled well and the pump down in it?
Yes, the systems are different. Your pump pulls water from the well and then pushes it into the tank and house plumbing. A deep well has a submerged pump that pushes the water out of the well to the pressure tank and house plumbing. The pressure tank can be Tee'd anywhere into the line that leaves the well.
 

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the main reason for the tanks in home plumbing is to help dampen the pressure surges when the pump turns on and to provide pressureized water right away rather than waiting for the pump to build up pressure. the system works basically the same as the charging system on a car/tractor think of the pump as an alternator and the tank as the battery. the battery is there to provide power when the alternator cant and it also acts like a voltage buffer for when the alternator output varies. so back to the water the tank will hold pressureized water until a faucet is turned on then as tank pressure drops the pump kicks on and runs until after the water is turned off and the pressure in the system is back to the cutoff point.
The analogy is quite incorrect. Pressure tanks are there to provide a way to control the off/on cycle of the pump. Water cannot be compressed but air can. The size of the pressure tank is directly related to the amount of water (drawdown) that is available for use in the house before the pump is asked to start back up due to falling water pressure. The larger the pressure tank, the more drawdown water is available. However, if the tank is too large, then the house suffers from low water pressure for too long a time. Not a fun thing when you're in the shower.

The amount of drawdown water available is also affected by the start/stop settings on the pressure switch. If you run a 20 psi cut-in and a 40 psi cut-off, then you'll have more drawdown water available than if you run a 40 psi cut-in and a 60 psi cut-off setting.

Be sure that you are choosing the correct size of pressure tank for your system. If in doubt, contact the people who make the pressure tanks for their recommendation.

Batterys are there to start a vehicle ONLY. Once the vehicle is started, the alternator takes over supplying all the current needed to operate every aspect of the vehicle including recharging the battery. A battery does not regulate the alternator. The alternator's regulator takes care of that function.
 

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what i was getting at is that the also helps to absorb voltage spikes in the electrical system while the engine is running it will act as a buffer of sorts during times where there is a high electrical load and low alternator output. a great example of this is to turn on the headlights on your tractor at idle and watch the ammeter it will show either 0 or discharge but when the rpms are raised the alternator is able to supply enough power to charge the battery and run any electrical accessories. read any book about charging and starting systems and they will tell you the same thing. anytime there is an electrical draw that is greater than alternator output it will pull any extra needed power from the battery
 
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