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Following this. Seems like OP you're making a mountain out of a molehill. Looks to me like you simply have worn belt(s). Had the same thing happen many times on my old B10. New belt good as new. Check EBay for belts high quality heavy duty belts can be had there for cheap
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Following this. Seems like OP you're making a mountain out of a molehill. Looks to me like you simply have worn belt(s). Had the same thing happen many times on my old B10. New belt good as new. Check EBay for belts high quality heavy duty belts can be had there for cheap
Well, it wouldn't be the first time. And it is the least-expensive option, it seems. So, yeah...off belt-shopping I go.

Thanks.
 

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Go to PartsTree.com and find the number. There are sellers on EBay that sell very high quality belts but you just need to know the OEM number to X Reference
 

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Discussion Starter #24
The latest:

Swapping the lower-front pulley did not help.

Putting on a new belt did not help.

I think I'm going to put the other pulley back on and see what happens.

A few things to note:

First, when I move the directional lever to "Reverse" (and just a bit of actually going in reverse) and then back to "Forward," I get a very temporary but noticeable increase in "grip." The tractor almost lurches forward just a bit. But again, this is not sustained. Second, it seems to me that if the engine simply doesn't have the guts to make it up the hill in second gear, the tractor would never make it up the hill in second gear. But yet, it does...at least for a while. But is it possible/probable that the engine loses...something...over time that prevents it from moving the tractor up the hill as time goes on? Wouldn't the engine bog down or something? As it is, the engine sounds/feels identical regardless of the tractor making it up the hill in second or not. Third, is it worth considering that there may simply not be enough weight on the rear of the tractor? I'm not a big guy, and maybe more weight (100 lbs?) would help.

That's it for now. Again, open to all comers on this topic.

Thank you.
 

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One of 3 things is happening if your machine won’t climb that hill: engine stalled/died, your wheels are spinning, or driveline slippage (I.e. belt slipping or sheared key on a drive pulley).
You said the engine doesn’t stall out, ruling out #1. Traction should be easy to check. We did have a fellow whose rim was actually spinning within the tire on a new tractor a couple weeks back. Tire had traction, no transmission slippage, no broken keys on pulleys, no belt slippage or anything... that was a new one by me.
 

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It might help if you had a video of the problem. It's hard to assess just from a description.

Adding weight is only a solution if any slippage is occurring. That variable needs to be absolutely ruled in or out. If nothing is actually slipping, then the problem is either in the transmission or the engine. What you might think is normal engine sound others might describe as a problem.

Second, it seems to me that if the engine simply doesn't have the guts to make it up the hill in second gear, the tractor would never make it up the hill in second gear. But yet, it does...at least for a while.
That indicates to me an engine problem. It could be in the ignition, as my power problem was, or it could be in the governor (if it has one )/ fuel problem. You also may want to check the engine compression.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Adding weight is only a solution if any slippage is occurring. That variable needs to be absolutely ruled in or out.
When I go up the hill backwards, then my tires slip on the yard. And I have the gouge marks to prove it. This is not what happens when going forward. When going forward, the tractor just stops, or inches (literally) along at a snail's pace. So I would say that, by all accounts, the tires are not slipping.

If nothing is actually slipping, then the problem is either in the transmission or the engine. What you might think is normal engine sound others might describe as a problem.
I'm certainly no expert on tractor engines, but I will say that this engine, in my opinion, is running about as well as any engine could, much less one that's over 45 years old. There is no smoke, she starts pretty much every time and sounds/feels smooth. I dare say it runs better than my truck. However, as I stated, I'm no expert on tractor engines.

That indicates to me an engine problem.
Well, ok. I'm in no position to disagree, other than to state what I already have.

It could be in the ignition, as my power problem was, or it could be in the governor (if it has one )/ fuel problem.
Some time back (as in two-or-so years ago) there was an issue with, as I recall, the jet on the carburetor. I got online to a help site and a guy sent me a manual for that (or similar) carb and walked me through things to look for. I ended up fixing it myself (with his help, of course) and it's run without (obvious) issue since. So again, I'm just having a hard time seeing the issue as being engine-related. But again....

You also may want to check the engine compression.
Ugh. I'll look elsewhere first...lol.

I decided that all of this was good cause for me to actually go through the operator's manual for the tractor (a first, yes). The first thing that caught my eye was transmission fluid. I checked the level and it was "LOW," as in "I couldn't see any." I figured that if I couldn't see it and that whomever had the tractor before I did probably never changed the oil, it was time to change it. So I drained it, and actually got a lot more than I thought I would. It also had that two-color thing going for it...you know...a little milky white streak in it, and pretty much NO (apparent) viscosity.

In looking at what oil to put into it, some 45 years later, the manual said "SAE 90." Well, little did I know that there (apparently) is no such thing as "SAE 90" oil anymore. So I asked at the store what would be the replacement oil, and was told "80W-90" was the closest I was going to get to "SAE 90." So, I bought it.

But I would dearly love to get input from others on this topic: did I pick the correct oil? (And, is it likely to make any difference in my "no-go" situation?)

Anyway, that's where it stands now. (Fun, fun...fun!)

Thanks.
 

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But I would dearly love to get input from others on this topic: did I pick the correct oil? (And, is it likely to make any difference in my "no-go" situation?)
That oil weight is fine. If low oil was the problem (and it may be part of it by the description of it coming out), I would expect it to affect movement in all gears. Sounds like reverse / others are working fine.
 

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That indicates to me an engine problem. It could be in the ignition, as my power problem was, or it could be in the governor (if it has one )/ fuel problem. You also may want to check the engine compression.
Engines produce torque, and over a specific amount of time, that torque translates into horsepower. If the load is too great, the engine rpm will drop and less torque and horsepower are produced. If the load stops, so does the engine, unless there is slippage somewhere in the drive train.

I have yet to see an internal combustion engine that slips under load. A reduction in engine rpm due to poor ignition, carburation, or timing is not the same as slippage.
 

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I feel like I am jumping into the middle of something I don't know much about, but having an AC and Simplicity tractor (neither are shuttles) I have seen posts about the AC shuttle drives over on Simple trACtors forum that indicate this may not be an uncommon problem with this system. The "shuttle" is a planetary gear reversing mechanism that needs to have everything adjusted just right to work properly - that includes braking pads, tension of the reversing belt, and some other adjustments. People say that it must be set up exactly according to the manual and have all the components functioning as they are supposed to. I don't think you have an issue with belt slippage so much as the shuttle being only partly in the correct forward or reverse position, and/or not staying in the right position.

I am no expert, not even a novice with the shuttles - but this sounded pretty familiar from following the forum.
 

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I have yet to see an internal combustion engine that slips under load. A reduction in engine rpm due to poor ignition, carburation, or timing is not the same as slippage.
Never said it was an engine slipping, (whatever that is ). The OP has stated there is no slippage...but the tractor doesn't move in second gear. Why only one gear is the problem.

Initial slippage investigations apparently revealed nothing. My recommendation is to then rule out all engine problems...rule out transmission problems, then look at the remaining components (again), which so far have revealed no clues.

If there is another component like a shuttle or a hi-lo shifter, that could be a place to look but we don't have a picture of the tractor or a video of the problem.
 

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Here is a pic of a Simplicity Shuttle drive. (this is from a 914, but the 416 is the same system) The large pulley and bolted gearbox is a forward/reverse planetary drive. This is hooked up to a 4-speed manual transmission. The brake band on the large pulley must be in adjustment, the mechanics that run the small pulley must be adjusted, The shift linkage and parking brake must be adjusted properly and the internal workings of the shuttle planetary must be in good working order. Having these things out of adjustment can result in the planetary not fully shifting that results in poor performance like that described in this post. The adjustments can only be made by following the sequence in the service manual, and maybe in the Operator manual, too.

The main clutch and drive belt on these is pretty bombproof - that is the smaller pulley in the lower right. It is just a spring-loaded clutch pedal engagement that can fit belts that are close to right.
 

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Here is a pic of a Simplicity Shuttle drive.
ZTT42,
Thanks for adding this picture. Much easier to understand the workings of a shuttle drive.
 

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The complexity of the mechanical system on this type of thing is why the hydrostatic drive was invented... ;)

Not saying it is a bad system; they are well built, but must be adjusted right or the dream turns into a nightmare.
 

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The brake band on the large pulley must be in adjustment, the mechanics that run the small pulley must be adjusted, The shift linkage and parking brake must be adjusted properly
The brakes would be an excellent place to start looking for problems. Are the brakes engaged or disengaged ?
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Hey all....

Sorry for being AWOL here, and was glad to see some dialog ensuing sans me.

In any event, an update.

Member ZTT42 sent me a private message which included a link to a Large-Frame Garden Tractcors - Service & Repair Manual and his/her (I presume male, but....) recommendation of where in the manual to start my search.

So today I got looking at it and saw really simple-to-follow directions for various drive train- and brake-related adjustments.

There were basically three, all of which I did do. The longest part of the whole thing was locating my tools...lol.

Anyway, after making all three adjustments, I took her to the base of the hill, put her in gear and throttled it. And...she didn't make it up in 2nd gear...she made it in 3RD GEAR!!!

WOOHOO!!!

Well, to say I was pleased would be a colossal understatement. But I had to see if it was a fluke. So, I started a second run when...she died. Just...died. Now this was going downhill...not uphill.

SIGH

So, yeah. She's sitting peacefully on the downhill slope, awaiting my next "AHA!" moment in the ongoing saga of my dear 401S. But she DID make it up the hill in 3rd gear WITH the mower running. So I am as pleased with that post-adjustments performance as I am disappointed that we have yet another issue.

For what it's worth, I 1) made sure the fuel tank had fuel (it did), 2) ensured that fuel was making it to the filter (it was) and 3) took the fuel filter off my 416S and put in my 410S (didn't help). So, although I haven't ensured that fuel is making it past the fuel filter, I will start a new thread on this topic.

Anyway, a huge "thank you" to everyone who helped me.

Well, onward and upward! See ya on the next thread. (Or not. :))
 

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Now everything is working ...except 2nd gear ?

If so, the problem must be in the transmission. Possibly #2 gear has a broken key on its shaft or the shaft is partially frozen due to bad bearings. Your manual should have some transmission diagrams.

If this is the case then you may want to find a parts tractor and swap transmissions.
 
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