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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for a 4x4 6cyl auto that i can tow with just a TOWBAR. Just need an older beater to go behind an RV. What do you recommend?
 

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I have an 84 Toyota that has seen a few tow bar miles. Mine had a 4 cyl. It was a little short on power, so I put in a 350 Chevy. The v6 Toyotas are fine hp wise. I put the transfer case in neutral and leave the trans (manual) in neutral too.

It's all up to what you like. Do you want a full size or are you brand specific.

With an auto I take off the rear driveshaft. My Toyota had a bad habbit of the t case not staying in neutral.
 

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Old Guy With Old Toys
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Jeep Wrangler or one of the other Jeep products. Remember, you need the brake system to be legal. I have towed the Wrangler thousands of miles.
 

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If it has a neutral in the transfer case, you can tow an auto.. Wrangler, Cherokee, Toyota pickups and older 4 Runners ( same thing ). some Ford Rangers, Some Ford Explorers, Older Nissans. Any of these will hook on a tow bar just fine
 

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the local ford fan
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a common type of vehicle alot of people use for a run around town vehicle to tow behind a rv are the following suzuki samurai , suzuki sidekick , or the chevy version , a geo tracker , however none of theses vehicles have a v6 option although the sidekicks and trackers have a optinal automatic transmission , any of the above models get pretty good gas mileage and are small which both are concerns of alot of people that have rvs , whatever model you pick make sure you have a good towbar and that all the mounting hardware is tight , good luck
 

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Id get a ranger/s10/dakota

Im using a 18' car hauler with whatever car/truck I want to take, got the brakes and everything on it, just hard to find a place to put it at campgrounds

have used a dolly and tow bar, by far the tow bar is the way to go, I know you should have brakes on whatever you tow, but we have pulled a toyota celica, dodge dakota, and a saturn sl2, all with no brakes, you could hardly feel them "pushing" you especialy behind a 36' rig, but the 4400lb mini van on the car dolly you could feel just a little bit. Car trailer has always had brakes. Im not telling you to not put brakes on it but speaking for me and from my father with prob 60k of towing 4 wheels down, never had a problem, and dad never let grass grow under his feet (hmmm that where I got it from)

either way have a good set of chains and a QUALITY set of mag mount tow lights, or wire up the truck so its lights work behind the motorhome

good luck and enjoy the road :thThumbsU
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If it has a neutral in the transfer case, you can tow an auto.. Wrangler, Cherokee, Toyota pickups and older 4 Runners ( same thing ). some Ford Rangers, Some Ford Explorers, Older Nissans. Any of these will hook on a tow bar just fine
My 88 Bronco full size is an auto with manual case and neutral. You can tow for about 30-50 miles-at slow speeds. Not hwy speeds.
 

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My 88 Bronco full size is an auto with manual case and neutral. You can tow for about 30-50 miles-at slow speeds. Not hwy speeds.
As long as the transfer case is in neutral, the transmission is not spinning, so you can tow it however fast it can safely be towed.. Most reccomend not to tow full size trucks behind tow dollies or tow bars..
 

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Towing an older 4x4 with the transfer case in neutral is OK,provided you go under 45 mph and less than 50 miles--faster or further wil eventually overheat the rear bearing in the transfer case or the slip yoke,from lack of lube,not enough gets splashed around that far up to sufficently lube them and it'll burn them up sooner or later...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Towing an older 4x4 with the transfer case in neutral is OK,provided you go under 45 mph and less than 50 miles--faster or further wil eventually overheat the rear bearing in the transfer case or the slip yoke,from lack of lube,not enough gets splashed around that far up to sufficently lube them and it'll burn them up sooner or later...
Would it matter if i left the engine running at an idle?
I thought the pump in the transfer case ran all the time. Gimme some education.Please. lol:thanku:
 

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Make sure the ball joints of the vehicle to be towed are good. One F150 I had, had stiff ball joints and the front wheels didn't like turning when being towed. I ended up stopping at the grocery store and bought about 500 pounds of salt bags and put them in the bed of the front F150 that was doing the pulling. Almost 10 years ago I made a huge tow bar. Its about 7-8 feet long. It has huge and thick angle iron for the frame. I used my unbreakable 84 F150 to tow my 83 F350 chassis cab diesel using that tow bar. The length makes a big difference.
 

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Would it matter if i left the engine running at an idle?
I thought the pump in the transfer case ran all the time. Gimme some education.Please. lol:thanku:
I think it depends on the vehicle- some don't pump oil when in neutral. While in theory any vehicle with a transfer case and a neutral position can be towed, it would probably be a good idea to find out about your specific vehicle.
 

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I remember reading about a mod for off-road Jeeps that got towed to the trail head that consisted of a paddle wheel mounted somewhere below the oil level that would sling the lube around because they *would* burn up otherwise if towed far enough.
It was some time ago and I don't remember where I read about it - was probably '4 Wheel & Off-Road' or 'Four Wheeler' magazine.
As far as I know, transfer cases don't really have a pump as such, they rely on moving gears to sling the oil around.

They do make auxiliary lube systems for towed vehicles that run off of 12V - not too familiar with them but that might be an option, too.
 

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Remco made drive shaft disconnects and pumps to use ....... Idk if the still do or not
Fmca ( family motor coach association ) and motorhome magazine have great towing guides on what can be towed and how u have to tow it, their database may go back pretty far.

Another option that could give you a better answer is a rv or motorhome forum. I don't mess with any of them so Idk where to point you
 
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