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608.1

I have a Troy-bilt horse tiller with the serial # 588012.

Can anyone tell what year the tiller is?

What bolo tine id number I will need for replacement? Or are all bolo tines the same?

Has anyone ever used the cultivating tines? If so, how did they work, pros/cons?



Thanks for your time, Mark
 

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Joe
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Hi Mark and welcome to MTF!
Go to "Tiller Talk" forum farther down the forums list and there you will find a file for finding the model year of your tiller. Never have used those tines so I can't answer. You'll need to get Troy Bilt tines for replacements for your tiller. How bad are the tines on there now? Troy Bilt says to measure two of the tines from inside tip to inside tip. New tines measure 3" and ones in need of replacement measure 5" I believe.:MTF_wel2:
Joe
:wwp::wwp:
 

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I Love All Color Tractors
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I just moved this to Tiller Talk for you so you can get some more replies.

To answer your serial number question, I have a spreadsheet at the top of this forum with a list of serial numbers versus years of production up to the time MTD took over production. Hope this helps. :fing32:

Oh, and welcome to the forum. :Welcome1:
 

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looks like yours is a Horse II built in Dec of 1981. We've only used the bolo tines. My dad wore the first set out so bad, they looked like a pitch fork before he changed them with the sharp points. Funny, my mom was cleaning out some files and found a manual from the tiller from 1976 that shows how to properly change the bolo tines. Maybe I can scan it for the board.
EDIT, I see it's already stickied.

Can't say anything about the cultivator tines, didn't even know they were available.
 

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I have a Troy-Bilt Horse from the late 60's or early 70's, it's just new enough to use the single belt two speed pulleys. My late grandfather bought it new and tilled the garden from hard rocky ground for many years. Last year I noticed that the BOLO tines were getting quite worn and were about that point of needing replaced. I noticed than the outer and center-most tine sets were worn out while the mid sets on each side were fairly good still.

Being the frugal tightwad that I am, I did the ol' switcheroo, placing the worn out tines facing the mid areas where there is double coverage, and the less worn tines facing the outer and center areas. The tiller has worked notable better since this change and once again isn't leaving such a large hard spot directly under the gear box. I figure this way it'll be several more years before I need to worry about buying a new set of tines.

On a side note, what are the best tines for breaking virgin ground, as I KNOW it isn't the bolos!! I feel like I'm wrestling a mad steer at times when that thing gets a good bite into hard or rocky ground!! I use the depth limiter to control this and make several passes, but surely a different tine would work much better!
 

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Dirt Digger
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Hey Guys!

I live in New Mexico. I got my '81 in about '92 and used it every year on my own garden and I also tilled some others every spring. This past spring, I repowered the unit with a HF OHV 6.5 Honda clone and it works great. (BTW, any one wanting details on how I fabricated a clamp for the throttle cable for remote operation, just let me know.)

Anyhow, before I tilled my own or anyone else's garden area, I made sure the soil was MOIST. Not just sprayed with a hose but watered as if it had rained about an inch or so. I ask the customer to do this about 24 hours before my arrival, usually in the late afternoon. That is usually enough time for the water to percolate into the soil. This is essential in my book. First, there is no dust to speak of. Secondly, especially on new ground, it is easier for the tines to penetrate on subsequent passes. Yes, it takes several if not many passes on virgin ground to prepare it for a seed bed. Thirdly, moist soil looks, feels and smells good. The customer can see that the tines have gone down their full depth.
 

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608.1

I have a Troy-bilt horse tiller with the serial # 588012.

Can anyone tell what year the tiller is?

What bolo tine id number I will need for replacement? Or are all bolo tines the same?

Has anyone ever used the cultivating tines? If so, how did they work, pros/cons?




Remember the inside tines can be swapped with the outside tines for much longer life!!

That is cheaper than replacing, and when I had mine off for swapping the last time, I welded on "hard surface" weld. That was 3 years ago, they show no signs of wear!!




Thanks for your time, Mark
Bolo tines are probably the best tines because of the chopping action of the tines. There is an attachment called a sod point that they offered. It is an attachment that goes on the back of the drag bar to help hold the tiller back when doing sod.
Here is a link to a brochure on the sod point:
http://troybilt.custhelp.com/ci/fattach/get/10012/0/session/L2F2LzEvdGltZS8xMzI3NTI2Mzc2L3NpZC9FUTdYTzJQaw==/filename/sod+point+SER39.pdf

That is a cool attachment, I will be cuttin' and drillin' the next time I go to the shop!!
Thanks for posting the pic!
:drunkie:
 
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