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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got a small shop, and I have a new helper that is going to helping me. I am to broke to pay big money right now so I am stuck with what I got before that comes up.

What I am trying to come up with is a Troubleshooting List for Chainsaws, Trimmers, blowers, etc.

#1. Document Equipment
#2. Verify it has fuel in the tank.
#3 Check Oil (If 4 cycle)

If it does not start
#4. Check Air Filter
#5. Check For Spark
#6. Check for fuel, Add tsp gas in plug hole and try.
#7. Check Fuel line to carb.
#8. Check Carb
#9. Check Compression.

Any assitance in adding to this list would be great help.
 

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Here is a question, how can you tell if the fuel a customer had in a chain saw had oil in it?
Is there a simple, or visual test besides if the fuel is colored, which does not always work?
Like you said gas and oil will have color, but running with no oil will scruff cylinder wall on exhaust side if you suspect that 2 bolts and mufflers off for inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I got one like this right now, fuel has oil cause it RED. When muffler is removed, there the black residue on the port, and the Cyl. and piston is scuffed. Is that enough to say, sorry I cannot warranty your saw? I am am just unclear I guess as to where that line is and what to exactly look for to be 100% sure. I just started doing warranty work, and lots of new stuff I am having to learn that I normally never had to deal with.

BTW, thanks for the help and info
 

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Compression specs are hard to find and very among models and manufactures. I have seen engines run from 25 a push mower to 160 Jonsered pro saw, one of the guys that I know would have a better idea than myself would be Red, or Walt 2002 I'm sure there are others there in small engine repair and are small engine mechanics with more knowledge than myself.
 

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This is the 2 stroke/handheld step/by/step I have created and use..

1. Verify its not seized, check for physical failures, and damage.
2. Check compression..if its low, nothing else matters.
3. Verify fresh fuel in tank...rule of thumb, if you didnt mix it, dump it and get the right stuff in it.
4. Put in a fresh plug...Yeah I know it looks like a good plug...now put in a new one.
5. Confirm engine is priming (getting fuel to carb). Look for broken lines, leaks, cracks.
6. Verify it is getting fuel to the combustion chamber..if its not, remove and inspecr carb. If thats good, pressure check the crankcase. If too much fuel, confirm muffler is not plugged, if it isnt, inspect carb.
7. If it starts and runs, but refuses to tune in, remove and inspect, rebuild carb...replace as necessary.
8. If it starts and will only idle, will not rev..just bogs, appears to flood...muffler is plugged.
 

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I have been told that you can verify that the fuel is pre-mixed by dipping a finger in the gas, and dribbling it on your forearm. Spread it around, and when it evaporates, if it is mixed, it will leave an oily streak. If it is pure[HA!!] gasoline, it won't leave an oily residue.
Now, as to the ratio...

tom
 

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Wouldn't it be easier --just to use your own fuel mix?

Dump the customer's stuff--whatever in a container-and keep a couple small two gallion mixs of your own--that way--you know what you are useing??


glenn
 

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I have been told that you can verify that the fuel is pre-mixed by dipping a finger in the gas, and dribbling it on your forearm. Spread it around, and when it evaporates, if it is mixed, it will leave an oily streak. If it is pure[HA!!] gasoline, it won't leave an oily residue.
Now, as to the ratio...

tom
Considering that oil and gas are both carcinogenic..I try to avoid as much interntional direct contact as I can possibly manage....

However...as I said before, if something comes in with gas in it, I dump it, and put in my own mix, and charge $2 for it. That way, I KNOW its fresh gas, I KNOW its mixed with a good oil, and i KNOW it even has oil in it...with 2 strokes you only get one ****. if its got straight gas in it, and you run it, and it dies...its on you.
 

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The documentation exists, but it varies wildly from model to model, year ot year, brand to brand...

On Echo stuff, some models are Fail @ under 90psi, and others fail @ 120psi.


The rule of thumb I use...on poulan, poulan pro, Ryobi, homelite trimmers and saws..if its under 100..its wore out. Stihl saws, Echo saws, Husky saws...Id like them to be around 150-160, and no less than 110.

100 is a good solid number to be at as the number to say "its got under 100, its no good" and "Its at 100, its questionable"....

100 is like...the bare minimum to get easy starting and a decent idle, and good power.

The closer you are to 150-160, the better.

If something comes in right around 100, I pop the muffler off and look for scoring, or scorching....
 

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Just curious, Onan18, why do you pull the muffler? To look for scoring on the piston/cylinder? Or to check the muffler for buildup that's restricting airflow? If it's to check the muffler, do you try starting it without the muffler?
 
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