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Discussion Starter #1
I have some Cedar trees that are varying in height up to let's say 20ft.
Can i trim off say about 3/4 of the limbs so as to get it to grow taller with a top? Like i have seen at some old church parking areas or the cemetery.:thanku:
 

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Will you be lifting the crown of the tree, ie removing all branches from the main trunk upto 3/4 high, or reducing the full shape of the tree by 3/4?

Either way, if they're quite old it may do them harm to take the full 3/4 off at once. It may be advisable to take 1/4 off this year and leave it a couple of years to recover....then returning back to get the desired shape at a later point.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That would be lifting the crown. I learned a new term today. thanks
 

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I'd say if the trees are young and healthy then crown lifting should emphasise growth on the top, as that is where it will be putting all of its energy...rather than distributing it all round the lower branches.

Will you be doing it yourself? If so then make sure you don't leave too much wood on where the branch was from the trunk, as this will be leaving various reserve growth buds which will sprout back to life. But also, dont cut below the 'collar', trees have so called collars which is a special ring of cells that can form the callus...the tree term for what heals over the wounds. If you look carfully you can see this ring on branches just where they join the main stem.

You've probably got about 1cm play of where to make the right cut, leave too much on and you may end up with lots of new shoots spouting back out of the remaining stump of branch, but cut too much off and the tree may be unable to heal over...leading to potential diseases in future.

Sorry if sounds a bit technical, anything you're unsure of i can go over again...
 

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I'd say if the trees are young and healthy then crown lifting should emphasise growth on the top, as that is where it will be putting all of its energy...rather than distributing it all round the lower branches.

Will you be doing it yourself? If so then make sure you don't leave too much wood on where the branch was from the trunk, as this will be leaving various reserve growth buds which will sprout back to life. But also, dont cut below the 'collar', trees have so called collars which is a special ring of cells that can form the callus...the tree term for what heals over the wounds. If you look carfully you can see this ring on branches just where they join the main stem.

You've probably got about 1cm play of where to make the right cut, leave too much on and you may end up with lots of new shoots spouting back out of the remaining stump of branch, but cut too much off and the tree may be unable to heal over...leading to potential diseases in future.

Sorry if sounds a bit technical, anything you're unsure of i can go over again...
Pristine,

You sound like an arborist. Are you one? :)
 

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We have 4 cedar hedges that were planted for privacy shield years ago. Early on I kept topping them so they would fill out more.

Now they are close to 10' thick but I continue to keep topping them every 3 years or so.

Ceders are shallow rooted and will easily tip over is a severe wind storm IF they get too tall.

There are many ways to trim but the easiest way for us is to put a man in the FEL with a chainsaw. Cedars are pretty much bullet proof.

You can 'trim' the sides to reduce some bushiness and it will grow back. Or you can cut the limbs for a permanent passageway effect.

In short if you want a thick privacy hedge...you must be ruthless trimming the tops for the first 7 years or so.
 

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Pristine,

You sound like an arborist. Are you one? :)

Wouldnt call myself an arbourist, though I did do trees as part of my studies at uni, and since worked in forestry and nature reserve management. Now running my own garden business, with many sub-contractors who are qualified arbourists...so always learning new stuff from them when doing jobs with em :)

Dave
 
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