My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am reposting as I found the problem. MTD 618-0307C transaxle where the upper housing is completely worn on one side leaving the axle riding through the top making the it go almost 1/4 of an inch too high on the left side.
Question is this is pricey, its been replaced by 918-0551A and isn't worth buying. Any idea where I can get a CHEAP replacement? any tractor junkyards out there? Its single speed, I'm sure there are good ones out there. If not the cheapest I can find the upper housing is $77, but then I have to hope the gears inside are ok. The upper housing part # is 953-04023
I thought these would be all over ebay, but there are none.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
There is one on Ebay right now under variable speed transaxle. If you are looking for a Cheap but effective solution: buy a pillow block bearing. Slide it onto the axle shaft and make a bracket that will hold it in place on the frame. You could do all this with bolts but welding would be quicker. You will then need to cut the shaft on the wheel a little shorter to compensate for the width of the pillow block bearing. I hope this makes sense.


or you could use a flange bearing like this:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Or JB-weld a bushing back in....
I like Kbeitz's idea. The bushings are about $2 online and there are 2 per side. take you transaxle out and put in 2 new bushings. Fill and dead space that was worn out with JB weld. It will hold up for as long or longer than the first ones did. I believe you bushing part number is 741-0340. It is a 3/4" inside diameter bushing that is 1" long and 1" outside diameter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
No, the case was way too far gone, ended up being worn right through. I picked up a whole transaxle for $50. The only problem I had in the process was getting the wheels off, they were all but welded to the axle. The rest of the swap was a piece of cake, just time consuming
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
No, the case was way too far gone, ended up being worn right through. I picked up a whole transaxle for $50. The only problem I had in the process was getting the wheels off, they were all but welded to the axle. The rest of the swap was a piece of cake, just time consuming
I can relate... my right rear is really stuck really good right now. The left is off.

I think I am going to attempt the jb weld/new bushing. Hopefullt the case opes easier than the wheel removal...
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,538 Posts
I have used the J-B Waterweld Putty with excellent results on repairs that need high strength--I had good luck with the "regular" J-B Weld two part stuff too,so when my truck's oil pan rotted through and started leaking badly,I decided to try the Waterweld putty,because it was the only one that listed "Oil Pans" as one of its uses on the package..

It has worked perfectly since last january!..so I'd say it resists oil and grease well!---it hardened hard as a rock in two hours,in 20 degeree weather,with only a 100W droplight bulb up against it to help it harden..all I did was drain the oil and spray brake cleaner on it to clean it thouroughly,--I did try soldering it first,but I doubt that held,even with tinners flux it wouldn't stick for crap!..so I gobbed on the Waterweld putty and it has worked great!..

I think the putty type stuff hardened even harder than the "old" J-B weld that comes in the two tubes..

They make a "J-B PUTTY"too,that seems to be almost the same stuff,but it wont harden underwater like the Waterweld..--I've seen some "Quick-Metal" putty that is similar too,at Auto-zone,that has a higher temparature rating (500 degrees VS 250-300 on the Waterweld),but I haven't tried any of that stuff yet..

My friend has used the Waterweld to seal a crack in a front wheel drive transmission he installed he got from a wrecked car,and evidently it got cracked in the accident..it wasn't a gusher or high pressure,but he couldn't give the car back that way either--so he told the owner ,he'd either have to get another one,replace it again,or he could try the J-B Waterweld..so far,9 months later,no leakage!..he has since used it on many other things we never thought it would work on too,hasn't failed yet!..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I have used the J-B Waterweld Putty with excellent results on repairs that need high strength--I had good luck with the "regular" J-B Weld two part stuff too,so when my truck's oil pan rotted through and started leaking badly,I decided to try the Waterweld putty,because it was the only one that listed "Oil Pans" as one of its uses on the package..

It has worked perfectly since last january!..so I'd say it resists oil and grease well!---it hardened hard as a rock in two hours,in 20 degeree weather,with only a 100W droplight bulb up against it to help it harden..all I did was drain the oil and spray brake cleaner on it to clean it thouroughly,--I did try soldering it first,but I doubt that held,even with tinners flux it wouldn't stick for crap!..so I gobbed on the Waterweld putty and it has worked great!..

I think the putty type stuff hardened even harder than the "old" J-B weld that comes in the two tubes..

They make a "J-B PUTTY"too,that seems to be almost the same stuff,but it wont harden underwater like the Waterweld..--I've seen some "Quick-Metal" putty that is similar too,at Auto-zone,that has a higher temparature rating (500 degrees VS 250-300 on the Waterweld),but I haven't tried any of that stuff yet..

My friend has used the Waterweld to seal a crack in a front wheel drive transmission he installed he got from a wrecked car,and evidently it got cracked in the accident..it wasn't a gusher or high pressure,but he couldn't give the car back that way either--so he told the owner ,he'd either have to get another one,replace it again,or he could try the J-B Waterweld..so far,9 months later,no leakage!..he has since used it on many other things we never thought it would work on too,hasn't failed yet!..
that's why I'm thinking this will go well, the piece that has to be filled has the bushing on the other side, so the wear will be on the bushing not the jb weld. Not to mention that my mtd probably weighs less than I do...

I've used the auto zone stuff before as well as various "putty-type" fillers. I've been happy with the results every time. I recently used the 2 part stuff to fill my front axles where the nylon bushing had worn the shaft badly. that seems to be holding strong too for now. Now if only that wheel would come off... :bonk:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
My question is, if you are going to remove the transaxle and regrease and repair it. Wouldn't you be better off just cleaning and regreasing one that doesn't need any JB Weld to hold it's bushing back in?

On mine it wasn't an option, the transaxle case was shot which I couldn't see until it was removed, but it just seems like your spending more time and effort to save $40 on a temporary repair when you could have a solid regreased used transaxle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
My question is, if you are going to remove the transaxle and regrease and repair it. Wouldn't you be better off just cleaning and regreasing one that doesn't need any JB Weld to hold it's bushing back in?

On mine it wasn't an option, the transaxle case was shot which I couldn't see until it was removed, but it just seems like your spending more time and effort to save $40 on a temporary repair when you could have a solid regreased used transaxle.
honestly I feel comfortable with the jb weld, I don't consider it temporary, although I know it has its limitations. if the case is too buggered up when I get it apart, or there are internal problems (fingers crossed) then I am going to have to replace it. No telling what riding on the bad bushing has done to the internals. For now I have more time than money so It's worth at least inspecting before throwing it out.

been working on that right wheel this morning it actually broke the bolt holding my puller on the wheel while attempting to press it off. This job is a bummer so far. Thinking about just putting it back together and riding it till the trans really breaks, then replacing it and a rim.

Good news is my push mower is working fine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Got it! opened the case to find the bushing is worn, but the case has taken very little damage the seal lip on the case is in good gondition. a new bushing and seal should be all I need. For some reason the grease on the shaft was minimal on that side, obviously that is what caused the failure. Maybe it was parked on a slant it's whole life, or just a bad design, it is the longer side of the trans. wish I didn't work afternoons... this one deserves a cold one!

 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,538 Posts
Looks like you caught it just in time!..wont need much,if any "J-B" to fix it..


I use this trick often on rusted rims and pulleys that refuse to budge..you need a welder though,to do it..

I've used a hex nut that has a washer made onto it, to aid in removing "stuck" rims and pulleys that have keyways,and are rusted solid....sometimes you'll need to weld on a short peice of pipe to the nut with a bit larger I.D. than the axle,so it'll clear the snap ring area and the axle that protrudes out past the rim,if it uses a snap ring to hold the rim on..
naturally the nut must have a slightly smaller I.D.like 5/8"if the axle is 3/4"..

I weld the nut and pipe onto the rim's hub in 3 spots,not a bead,just tack welds,so they can be ground off easily later on--then once the nut is tacked on,screwing in a bolt will "push" on the axle,and take off of the rim..best to do it right after tack welding it on ,like a minute or two ,so the heat from welding it will expand the hub slightly and aid in removal..an air impact gun works slick,but a regular wrench will sufice too,you might have to whack the bolt with a hammer after torquing up on it to get things started--penetrating oil helps too..

I've managed to salvage rims and pulleys this way without destroying them,like using typical pullers would..on some pulleys I have simply left the nut welded on,if it wont interfere with anything,in case there's a "next time"--but I put "Never Seize" on those things after getting them off,and they rarely ever get stuck again..
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top