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GramPa
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I have chains on my tractor and they seem to work perfect for me, but If I look at chains for sale on the internet I don't see any like what I use. For now that is fine but if I were to buy store chains what would this type of tractor chains be called? Mine has the cross links but then I have another chain that goes around the centre of tire with bolts at each cross ling sticking out approximately 2 inches. These bolts are grade 8 so they do not bend. With these on an incline of nothing but smooth ice I can still back up mind you sometimes it spins a bit to make its own path....so what type of tractor chains do I have...what do you use.:thanku:
 

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Looks homemade.
Loggers use a similiar type chain configuration, just on a different scale.
Looks like typical, run to the hardware store type chain, attached mid-cross link and around the outside of the tire tread. The bolts wouldn't turn into the tire tread since the 'inter crosslink' chain is holding all the cross links taught.
 

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I have chains on my tractor and they seem to work perfect for me, but If I look at chains for sale on the internet I don't see any like what I use. For now that is fine but if I were to buy store chains what would this type of tractor chains be called? Mine has the cross links but then I have another chain that goes around the centre of tire with bolts at each cross ling sticking out approximately 2 inches. These bolts are grade 8 so they do not bend. With these on an incline of nothing but smooth ice I can still back up mind you sometimes it spins a bit to make its own path....so what type of tractor chains do I have...what do you use.:thanku:
You'd be better off with standard 2-link ladder chains.

JayC
 

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Those are nice, but the connection on the cross links serve primarily to keep the chains from falling into the tread - important with ags and tires with heavy lugs (like on skidders).

Your chains are 4-link, so the cross links are far apart. there are twice as many cross links on a 2-link chain. For a lawn/garden tractor, a plain old 2-link will give the best traction and best ride. V-bars would be even better, provided you aren't going to driving around on asphalt or cement too much.

http://tirechain.com/GardenTractorChains.htm

I have 2-link V-bars on the front tires of my Kubota L4200, which I use to push a 6' snowblower on 1000' driveway all winter - they are so effective I haven't even had to mount the 2-link chains for the rears.

JayC
 

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GramPa
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks....for the link. I now know what I want for my next set of chains and will be on the outlook for them at auctions and yardsales. I want the 2-link V Bar chains.:thanku:




Those are nice, but the connection on the cross links serve primarily to keep the chains from falling into the tread - important with ags and tires with heavy lugs (like on skidders).

Your chains are 4-link, so the cross links are far apart. there are twice as many cross links on a 2-link chain. For a lawn/garden tractor, a plain old 2-link will give the best traction and best ride. V-bars would be even better, provided you aren't going to driving around on asphalt or cement too much.

http://tirechain.com/GardenTractorChains.htm

I have 2-link V-bars on the front tires of my Kubota L4200, which I use to push a 6' snowblower on 1000' driveway all winter - they are so effective I haven't even had to mount the 2-link chains for the rears.

JayC
 
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