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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So my son ends up purchasing a 12 ft long toolbox for his truck accessory biz. It is replacing three other toolboxes and consolidates everything (almost) in one spot. Got really BIG discount from Snap-On guy (was working on push for quota) and great trade-in on other three boxes along with free financing which was paid off in six months. So this mega box is sweet but he's worried that the top will get all dinged up and asks what can we (I) do to protect it. It comes with a rubber mat but that doesn't extend over the edges. Oh yeah and since the box took all the money we (he) didn't want to break the bank and go into hock. (read that as little money as possible)

Well I like to keep busy so I came up with the idea for a wood top similar to a laminated bread board. One of the main products he sells are truck caps. When they are shipped in they are bolted to 1X8 rough cut boards 7 - 8 ft long. Over the years I have been collecting these from his pile at work and setting up covered racks to sticker and air dry them. Although now most of the wood is pine, 7/8 yrs ago it was a nice collection of oak, cherry, birch, maple and even some black walnut. So having three piles of wood (7/8ft long X 6ft wide and 5 ft high) that has dried for at least five years, it's into the shop I go.

First I had joint the edge and rip the boards into 1 3/8 " strips. Then the strips were planned smooth with thickness of of 15/16". Now I have a decent shop but it's not the biggest. I had to build a flat surface that would allow me to glue and clap the strips into slabs.
And let me tell you, this project was really taking up some space. My shop is 24 ft long and 12ft wide. A lot of my equipment is on wheels so I can maximize the space I have.



It certainly was an interesting dance to slice the strips, stacking them in the corners and then cutting them to several prescribed lengths.
To make sure joints were staggered between strips I came up with seven different combination but it was a real nightmare trying to get them all arranged, then gluing, assembling and clamping, all within the 10 -15 minutes of open work time with TiteBond III. Especially doing alone. A favorite woodworker's
axiom is that "you can never have too many clamps." And to that I say AMEN!







Well you get the picture.
After gluing, and carting off the slabs into the garage(five total) that would makeup the 30" width, it was time to assemble. The slabs were a variety of widths from the smallest at 5 1/4" to largest at 9". Each slab was then planned to final thickness of 1 5/16", glued together two at a time to ensure it stayed flat.



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Assembled the resulting top was 31" wide and trimmed to 29 7/8. The bottom was rabbeted 1/4" around to allow the piece to sit atop the box but covering the edges.



The top was sanded, any imperfections filled and then three coats of a hand rubbed poly applied.



And the top on the box.



Note bad for wood that was destined for scrap.
Couple side notes. Thank goodness for a mild January cause in order to plane the pieces, and the 12' 4" length, the planner was set up in the middle and the slabs ended up going through the door, stopping 3/4" before the porch railing.
Also after putting the top on, it was decided that the wall above it was a mess so the assembly bench was turned into a matching (in color but of plywood) backsplash. Course knew we'd never see the top when in use. He's also got the flat surface disease. Hmm, wonder where he got that from?
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From start to finish, this one man (75 yr old) show took two months. But that's along with the holidays and other tasks.
MikeC
 

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Mike, you are a craftsman. If your son starts using that top as a workbench,I would hate to see that finish get banged up.

I vote you as having the most clamps of any MTF member. :LOL:
 

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Looks like the shuffleboard tables I used to see in bars when I was younger.... with the heavy shiny discs that were used for pucks...there was always a can of something like sawdust to sprinkle on it to make the pucks slide better...that is a beautiful job you did (y)
 

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Nice work. While reading I was going to comment about a back splash, but you were way ahead of me. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the compliments folks.

Mike, you are a craftsman. If your son starts using that top as a workbench,I would hate to see that finish get banged up.

I vote you as having the most clamps of any MTF member. :LOL:
Al, being that it's edge grain should be like an old Timex..."takes a licking, keeps on ticking." Besides as we often say on here about tractors... "that'll rub out!" After all it is hand rubbed poly, Some 320 scuffing and rub it in. Although as you see from all the stuff on it already, who's gonna notice? As for clamps, well there's another twenty or so on racks. Had to have so many because of some free form laminations for sleigh bed I made for my daughter.


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Looks like the shuffleboard tables I used to see in bars when I was younger.... with the heavy shiny discs that were used for pucks...there was always a can of something like sawdust to sprinkle on it to make the pucks slide better...that is a beautiful job you did (y)
Thanks Mark. Actually a friend of ours saw this and was wondering if I could make a 14 ft shuffle board for his man cave. Not sure I really want to do that though cause I'm a one of a kind:eek: and done when it comes to my woodworking projects.

Nice work. While reading I was going to comment about a back splash, but you were way ahead of me. :)
Yeah, thinking I should have painted a line across the middle as a reference so when the stuff on the top reaches the line it's time to clean the bench.

MikeC
 

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Discussion Starter #11
WOW! on that bed...what a piece of art ...really nice
Thanks, that was all "in my minds eye." I get the idea and then make it. Don't have plans, just the idea from stuff I'd seen. Usually its how long and how wide and I go from there. Wanted it to look like a sleigh. Most of the ones you see these days have the foot facing forward which, I think, takes away from the sleigh look. Had to extend the length of my lathe to accommodate the turning of the six foot blanket rails. The curved slats were all made in a two piece form clamp I cut the shape in, one for the headboard and one for the foot board. I glued together 10 1/8 in X 2" wide pieces that I cut from 2" rough cut stock for each curved piece. Could do two a day, one foot and one head. Carved the bed rail end pieces. The bed comes apart by removing the two pieces that are screwed to the ft board and hd board with 16 3/4 brass flat head screws. Which makes for some antsy work getting up the stairwell at her old house.


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Good thing I made a cardboard template, although I made it before a last minute change in design which I found out just made it through w/ 1/2" to spare. Funny thing though, it was harder to get into her new MUCH larger house. But it finally did, after removing a sliding door in a sitting room which attached to their bedroom.
MikeC
 
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