My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have recently come into possession of a beautiful, functioning JD Model 50 to help me on my sheep farm. But I am new to tractors. As such, my workshop does not have the kind of tools that I will likely frequently need to service this tractor. For example, I had to take off one of the rear tires to send out for repair and I did not have the necessary 1-1/16" wrench for the wheel bolts. Fortunately, a friend was able to lend me this wrench, but I would like to obtain my own set of the commonly needed tools for this tractor. Of course, I cannot outfit any kind of serious repair shop for the tractor, but I think I should have the basic tools to do owner's maintenance tasks. I was hoping that someone on this forum who owns the JD Model 50 might give me some suggestions in this regard so that I do not end up buying tools one at time and never having what I need on hand when I need it. Would I also be in need of wrenches in sizes 1-1/8", etc? I saw a set of large wrenches at Tractor Supply that starts with the 1-1/8" and then has four more. It is certainly cheaper than buying wrenches individually. Any advice would be much appreciated. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Sorry, I posted this in the wrong forum. I will repost in the Big tractor forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have recently come into possession of a beautiful, functioning JD Model 50 to help me on my sheep farm. But I am new to tractors. As such, my workshop does not have the kind of tools that I will likely frequently need to service this tractor. For example, I had to take off one of the rear tires to send out for repair and I did not have the necessary 1-1/16" wrench for the wheel bolts. Fortunately, a friend was able to lend me this wrench, but I would like to obtain my own set of commonly needed tools for this tractor. Of course, I cannot outfit any kind of serious repair shop for the tractor, but I think I should have the basic tools to do the owner's maintenance tasks. I was hoping that someone on this forum who owns the JD Model 50 might give me some suggestions in this regard so that I do not end up buying tools one at a time and never having what I need on hand when I need it. Would I also be in need of wrenches in sizes 1-1/8", etc? I saw a set of large wrenches at Tractor Supply that starts with the 1-1/8" and then has four more. It is certainly cheaper than buying wrenches individually. Any advice would be much appreciated. Thank you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,085 Posts
Did you get the owners manual with the tractor? If not it should be in the John Deere sticks section. I would start with a 3/4 inch drive set and a complete set of end wrenches 1-1/4 inch and down. Other than that just regular automotive tools should do the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Did you get the owners manual with the tractor? If not it should be in the John Deere sticks section. I would start with a 3/4 inch drive set and a complete set of end wrenches 1-1/4 inch and down. Other than that just regular automotive tools should do the job.
Ariens93GT20, Thank you. I have the owner's manual on its way to me. So I understand that I would have no real need for wrenches larger than 1-1/4". That is helpful for me at the moment. Thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,085 Posts
No wrench that the 3/4 inch drive set would not take care of. Growing up dad had a model B and a 70. The only tools that were in the tool box was a standard screw diver, pliers, hammer and an adjustable crescent wrench or two. That took care of just about anything that was done in the field.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
No wrench that the 3/4 inch drive set would not take care of. Growing up dad had a model B and a 70. The only tools that were in the tool box was a standard screw diver, pliers, hammer and an adjustable crescent wrench or two. That took care of just about anything that was done in the field.
Thanks. Good to hear. The large tools can get pretty expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
I'd look at Harbor Freight or Northern Tool for a 3/4" drive socket set...$70. You could go top shelf, Craftsman or Snap-On...$200+/-... but considering the number of times you're going to use them, the cheaper are a better value.Bob
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,809 Posts
Agreed to buy a moderately priced good quality standard set of tools, and supplement as necessary as time reveals new needs.

And a big hammer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aldenb

·
Parts collector
Joined
·
3,498 Posts
I'd look at Harbor Freight or Northern Tool for a 3/4" drive socket set...$70. You could go top shelf, Craftsman or Snap-On...$200+/-... but considering the number of times you're going to use them, the cheaper are a better value.Bob
Agreed to buy a moderately priced good quality standard set of tools, and supplement as necessary as time reveals new needs.

And a big hammer.

I agree with the harbor Freight idea. Definitely go buy a 3/4" drive socket set, a 3lbs hand sledge (big hammer) I would also get an electric or air impact wrench. The HF earthquake brand air impact is great for the price and then get a set of big impact sockets.

For as often as you will need them I see no reason to go expensive. I have HF tools that have lasted 10+ years I have snap-on stuff I had to have fixed within 2 years. I can throw away HF stuff and buy new 4 times before I reach the price of snap-on.

Do a walk around the tractor, look at bolt sizes, and figure out what you "may" need, go to HF and buy what you think you need. Add on as needed.

Good luck and they are really cool old tractors.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aldenb

·
Professional Homeowner
Joined
·
7,615 Posts
Basic hand and automotive tools for sure. You'd be surprised how basic the tools are that are needed for major repairs on many machines.

If you run into something you don't have the special tool for (although I might consider large wrenches and sockets and stuff to be basic tools), then go out and buy/borrow it.

However, if you don't have one already, get a good torque wrench and a multimeter.
When buying common tools if you don't already have them, don't skimp. Get decent pliers, screwdrivers, and wrenches. I've had good luck with older craftsman stuff, but now I buy some Husky and Kobalt. I have splurged and bought some really good Snap-On and Matco stuff on a very limited basis (screwdrivers, air tools, etc) and was not sorry at the time. Since then, however, the quality of imported tools has GREATLY improved.
I have some Companion (cheap Sears line) stuff I'm half tempted to throw out because the pliers have a tendency to keep falling apart on me. My Dutch blood just won't allow it though.
 

·
Professional Homeowner
Joined
·
7,615 Posts
I noticed there's another thread like this in another forum. The mention about an air or electric impact wrench was mentioned. Unless you have a big compressor, go with electric. However, a good/strong/large oil lube compressor I consider a shop essential. It's definitely a tool you won't regret buying. Keep the tank drained and it will last a very, very long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Gentlemen, My warmest thanks to you guys for the advice so far. And I am sorry that I initially posted my request for help in the JD lawn tractor sector. I did not pay attention. I tried to delete it immediately but did not know how. And I do not know how to move it from there. Again, please forgive the nuisance. /// Regarding the tools, I should add that I am a retiree office worker living on a fixed income after moving out of the big city and up to northern Maine to start up a sheep farm. I have tools that accumulated over the years when I would do repairs to my cars and pick-ups. So I tend to have the 1/8" and 1/4" drive stuff; wrenches up to size 3/4", etc. And I am no mechanic. What I do is take the owner and service manuals and study up on how to fix whatever I think might be the problem. My tack is usually to just swap out a part because it is cheaper and easier for me than to send a vehicle to a shop. I am somewhat better with electrical. Anyway, I have a somewhat limited budget to buy tools. And at my age, with none of my kids having even remote interest in sheep farming, tractors, or mechanical issues in general, I hesitate to spend big bucks to accumulate tons of tools that will have, maybe, ten years of use! I do have a Craftsman 1/2" torque wrench for 20-150 ft.lbs., but no sockets for it yet. I have to decide whether the 1/2" will be ok for say, bolting the 1-1/16" nuts on the tires, or whether I must go up to 3/4" drive. As for an impact driver, I have one of the cheapie ones which I doubt would handle the kind of stuff on my JD Model 50. An air system is pretty much out of the question for now due to financial considerations. For lubing, I have a handheld grease gun that takes cartridges. In sum, I can manage to budget a couple hundred dollars for critical tools to maintain this tractor. I just have to be careful with my choices. Gentlemen, I am grateful to all of you for sharing your knowledge and experience!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,809 Posts
I have merged the two threads to avoid confusion and keep all the answers in the same place. Also relocated to the Big JD forum.

Agreed the other tool you might consider is a good impact wrench, electric or air... takes the lot of the grunt out of breaking old nuts and bolts free.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aldenb

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I agree with the harbor Freight idea. Definitely go buy a 3/4" drive socket set, a 3lbs hand sledge (big hammer) I would also get an electric or air impact wrench. The HF earthquake brand air impact is great for the price and then get a set of big impact sockets.

For as often as you will need them I see no reason to go expensive. I have HF tools that have lasted 10+ years I have snap-on stuff I had to have fixed within 2 years. I can throw away HF stuff and buy new 4 times before I reach the price of snap-on.

Do a walk around the tractor, look at bolt sizes, and figure out what you "may" need, go to HF and buy what you think you need. Add on as needed.

Good luck and they are really cool old tractors.
Mopar65pa, Thank you. It happens that I have a decent torque wrench, a Craftsman, that handles 20-150 ft.lbs. But it is a 1/2" drive. Is it your opinion that I would be better off buying the 3/4" drive? The 1/2" cost me some $75 some years ago and I have never even used it; it is still new in the box. I have no sockets for it, so if I must go to 3/4" it will not be a major loss for me- just a loss that I would avoid if I could. Today I was able to mount a repaired tire on the beast using a pipe wrench. But I have not yet torqued the bolts. They need to be 150 ft. lbs. Thank you for your time and attention!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,085 Posts
How long is the handle on your 1/2"? 150 may not be to bad a pull if the handle is long enough. They make 1/2 to 3/4 adaptors. That would at least save the cost of two large socket sets and allow the strength of the 3/4 set. Braking things loose is always harder than tightening. Good luck with the tire install. The key is to get everything installed before tightening.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
5,890 Posts
Some stuff that is always handy is a couple of adjustable crescent wrenches and a few channel lock pliers of varying sizes, a decent screwdriver selection and a 1/2 inch drive electric drill...cordless are handy, but if you get into some serious drilling you are going to need a 110V drill and decent bits...don't get the bits at Harbor Freight...also get yourself an oil filter wrench
 

·
Professional Homeowner
Joined
·
7,615 Posts
I'm not too sure about applying 150 ft-lb with a torque wrench designed only for 120. Might throw off the accuracy, or break it entirely.

The mention of an adjustable wrench was made. Use caution with these, especially on stuck bolts. That said, I have one made by Stanley that's a combination of a crescent wrench and a vice grip. Very handy tool that doesn't tend to round off anything. I've actually snapped the head off a bolt with it. I keep meaning to start a thread about it. One of my favorite tools for sure.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top