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Discussion Starter #1
For those guys looking to tackle the task of tire removal/replacement or rim painting, I put together a little pictorial of the task. I started it on Sunday night and finished tonight. Longest time was waiting for the paint to cure. One side of the rims was painted last night and the other side painted this afternoon.
A little patience can go a long way with this task. It's easier than you might think and not beyond anyone with some simple tools at hand.:goodl:

When viewing the album, select slideshow at the top right of the screen. That will give you full screen pics with descriptions below the pics. You can also click on any pic for full screen image of that pic.

http://s488.photobucket.com/albums/rr247/Mickeymotormount/Tire pics/
 

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Gravely bug bit.
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For those guys looking to tackle the task of tire removal/replacement or rim painting, I put together a little pictorial of the task. I started it on Sunday night and finished tonight. Longest time was waiting for the paint to cure. One side of the rims was painted last night and the other side painted this afternoon.
A little patience can go a long way with this task. It's easier than you might think and not beyond anyone with some simple tools at hand.:goodl:

When viewing the album, select slideshow at the top right of the screen. That will give you full screen pics with descriptions below the pics. You can also click on any pic for full screen image of that pic.

http://s488.photobucket.com/albums/rr247/Mickeymotormount/Tire pics/
But those are turf tires. ;)

















































:thThumbsU
 

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Aye carumba, is it really as straightforward as that?

First question: It it difficult to put a new valve stem in? Will dish soap do the trick again?

Second question: The bead area on the wheels for my cart is heavily pitted. The entirety of the wheels were sandblasted and then I primed and painted them, but the pitting is still severe. Should I be installing a tube to prevent problems with the tire bead adhering?

TIA

Oh, and thanks for the step-by-step, I think I could handle this myself now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Aye carumba, is it really as straightforward as that?

First question: It it difficult to put a new valve stem in? Will dish soap do the trick again?

Second question: The bead area on the wheels for my cart is heavily pitted. The entirety of the wheels were sandblasted and then I primed and painted them, but the pitting is still severe. Should I be installing a tube to prevent problems with the tire bead adhering?

TIA

Oh, and thanks for the step-by-step, I think I could handle this myself now.
Soap will work, but a special tool is usually used to pull the valve stem through the rim. The valve stem is slipped through the rim, then the tool is threaded over it and used to pull the stem through the rim. The tool is hinged, so that after it is threaded onto the stem, it is bent over the outside of the rim as a lever and is used to pry the valve stem through the rim.

For the pitting, heavy grease may be used to help seal the bead. I saw a car shop use it once on my truck rims years ago. They were also pitted and the mechanic put grease on the bead area of the rim and then inflated the tire. It held air. If you don't want to try that, the tube may be your only option.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have heard tho, that some greases can 'hurt' rubber over time??
There is a black liquid rubber sealer the is better for pitted rims.
Thanks Chriscris. I figured there had to be something out there for pitted rims. I would hate to suggest using silicone or fix-a-flat as this makes future tire removal difficult or next to impossible.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Very helpful! Thanks for the detailed post & pics!
Thanks. To answer Marc's first question which I seemed to have skipped over: Yes, it is that straightforward. As Don pointed out, they are turf tires. I don't think I would want to try big farm tractor tires without a tire machine. But hey, for the purpose of lawn tractor tires, this info would be helpful to someone who has never attempted the task.

The old tires were pretty dry-checked and considerably softer and pliable compared to the new ones. This made removal easier than expected.

I got these new ones locally after seeing them for sale on Ebay. They are made by Goodyear for International Harvester. They have Cub Cadet imprinted on the sides.
 

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I'd go with tubes on the cart. Did this myself on a cart a few years back, as I got tired of reinflating the tubeless wheelbarrow tires everytime the temps. dropped here. I'm curious about how the Appliance Epoxy paint would hold up on the inside rim surface in a liquid ballast scenario. I'm tempted to powder coat a set of rims simply because of 1) The abuse they take when putting the tires back on 2) the rust-prone nature; 3) stories of paint lifting in liquid ballasted tubeless tires and leaking all over.
 

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Thanks Mickeymotormount for the DIY guide it's most helpful. :fing32:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'd go with tubes on the cart. Did this myself on a cart a few years back, as I got tired of reinflating the tubeless wheelbarrow tires everytime the temps. dropped here. I'm curious about how the Appliance Epoxy paint would hold up on the inside rim surface in a liquid ballast scenario. I'm tempted to powder coat a set of rims simply because of 1) The abuse they take when putting the tires back on 2) the rust-prone nature; 3) stories of paint lifting in liquid ballasted tubeless tires and leaking all over.
If you have the option to have the rims powder coated, I would certainly go with that. Cost is always on my mind. Spray painting is the cheapest option for my budget.

Powder coating is much more durable as I believe the 8000 and all G series Gravely 4 wheel tractors are powder coated for rust prevention. Powder coating the rims will certainly give them the protection they need against tire replacement but I am not sure about the interior of the rim where it will be immersed in a certain type of liquid.
 
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