My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,563 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm doing some work on my brothers Zero turn that has a hole in one rear tire. I found the hole yesterday and tried twice to plug it and both times it leaked. I've put a bunch of them in car tires and don't remember any failures. I always use tubes in my tires but I didn't have one the right size so I was going with the easy fix. I guess I'll get a tube for it but I've seen other people plug mower tires successfully. Anyone else had trouble doing this.
Cannon
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,213 Posts
Sometimes it takes two, sometimes it just doesn't work. Two-ply tires are trickier than four-ply.

Is the glue and plugs fresh?

You can also glue a patch on the inside of the tire but by the time you go that far yep you might as well stuff a tube in...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,210 Posts
Why not just get a new tyre? It also depends on how old the tyre is. If you are trying to plug an old tyre that is brittle from age, getting a plug to seat correctly may be quite difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
I just plugged two holes in one of my front tires on my ZT last week and they both held believe it or not. They're not much heavier than a rubber band so I wasn't holding my breath for a no leak cure but it's still holding and I've used it a couple times since. Saying that, I'll go out the next time I need it and it'll be flat LOL....Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,563 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yea the plugs and glue are new. Also the tires are thin, I thought I was going to push it to the rim before I got the plug to go in. When I aired it up it was like a balloon expanding. I'll order a tube for it.
Cannon
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,152 Posts
Those thin tires don't have much force to squish a plug in and make a seal. I have put rubber cement on my plugs for several years and it seems to help.

I put some on the plug install tool, run it into the hole, then glue on the plug before I push it in.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,808 Posts
Depends on the shape of the hole as well. If it's a round puncture like a nail or thorn then it's easier to seal with a plug. If it's elongated then it gets harder and if it's an actual tear then it's near impossible. Had one years ago from an old broken glass jar a previous owner of my property left as a land mine for me. It basically cut a slit about 1.5" long and there was no way that would ever hold air with a plug. I put a patch on the inside along with an innertube and it held up for several years until I replaced the tire.
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,159 Posts
My friend who ran a tire shop & auto repair always put rubber cement on the "file" tool you shove thru the puncture to clean out debris and also dunked the plugs in the cement,he said it made them a lot easier to push in and gave a much better chance of a successful repair..only drawback was you had to wait a few minutes for the cement to flash off,before re-inflating the tire,otherwise it could blow back out..
When a customer is waiting for his/her tire to be repaired and ready to go and in a big rush,that can be a disadvantage..

Most of the lawn tractor tires I've tried plugging keep tearing as I inserted the plugs,some of the tires seem more like plastic or vinyl than rubber ,and don't accept plugs all that great..

I prefer using patch/plugs from the inside ,or a tube patch,and sometimes add a tube too,if its an old weather cracked tire,those love to go flat sitting any longer than a few days..now it is a toss up whether to just buy a new tire,seeing tubes are about half as much ,and aren't as good quality as they used to be..for the effort involved,the new tire makes more sense,though their quality is often poor or not so great compared to years ago..
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top