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Discussion Starter #1
Engine is a 1976 Tecumseh HM80 -156189 SER 62180 on a Ariens snowblower 924026 (1977 model year)

I don't know the history of the machine, it's a junkyard find that cost me approx. CA 7$...

I've changed the oil and fuel hose, I've been able to start the engine and even throw some snow with it. The engine was running strong like it was brand new. Used it 20 minutes with no troubles at all.

Tried it again the day after, but when I'm pulling the cord (even with the starter) there is a backfire in the carburetor, the engine won't start. Maybe something in the carb so I want to change the carb quickly for now and clean the original one later when spring comes. Looks like I can't find the same model I have on the snowblower; parts for the choke and the throttle are not the same. All the carburetor I saw are like the one on the picture below. I have a throttle cable and those ones don't have provisions for that.

I found those number on the carb but I've been unlucky in my searches... 581 667

Am I missing something?
 

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Is it starting or sputtering at all? Some of those old Tec carbs are very difficult to find...and others are available and cheap....I think it' s possibly a valve issue...for now, though the quickest attempt at a fix is to just pull the carb and clean it out well ....tiny drill bits in the passages to clear them...clean out the bowl, make sure the float is floating and not allowing excess fuel in...and see how that goes
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is it starting or sputtering at all?
The first time it started like on the 17th pull (I've used the starter), I don't know how much time it sat. But since that moment that I used it 20 min it don't want to start anymore. Some fuel is pouring out of the carb by the air intake with each cord pull (or starter turn) and it somewhat backfires in there. (the fuel is evacuated through the air intake with a "pow".
 

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If there is fuel 'pouring out of the carb by the air intake', then you have too much fuel in the float bowl.

You should not see fuel coming out the intake port where the air cleaner would be attached on other applications. I would at least drop the float bowl, pull the pin, float and needle. Check for gum that would make the needle operation sticky, or for schmutz up in the seat area. Make sure the float can move freely on the hinge pin. Put the needle, float and pin back in place, and diddle it up and down. It should move freely, and fall back down when released. If so, put the bowl back in place, open the fuel petcock or shutoff or clamp or bend or whatever stopped the fuel from watering the shop floor, and attempt to start. Put the choke fully on for the first pull. If it pops, open the choke just a smidge, and pull again. If it starts and stutters/stumbles/coughs and spits, open the coke slowly until it smooths out and wants to run without choke. If it doesn't pop or cough, squirt a jot of raw fuel into the carb, past the choke plate, and give it a pull to see if it wants to fire on that. You don't need a lot of liquid fuel to get one to fire off.
tom
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I bought a CA18$ chinese carb on amazon and installed it. The engine started on first pull, and after some adjustments on the carb it runs like new. There is some debris in the tank so I installed a fuel filter; this summer I'll clean the tank with water and let it dry. I bought a carb cleaning kit too, so I'll clean the old carb and rebuilt it later. Probably some debris that blocked a passage in the carburetor. I don't know how good and how long those chinese carbs will work but for 18$ it's a good price for a quick repair.

7$ purchase price for the snowblower, 18$ carb and about 3$ or fuel line. Not bad for a spare snowblower. I'll keep it for the engine, if I ever blow up an engine on one of my other snowblowers.

And the ones built these days are not as strong and heavy duty like the old ones from the past...
 

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Given that fuel tanks seem to rust if left to their own devices, and in US, having etoh in the fuel, it seems that preventing rust is a process. I would consider adding some 2-stroke oil to the fuel so when it evaporates or the level falls, it will leave an oily coating behind. Still thinking on that, but it seems workable.
My BIL mentioned that if you want to know if fuel has oil added, wipe a few drops on your arm. If it is 2-stroke mix, it will leave some oil behind. Should work in a tank.
I understand some of the old coatings used to encapsulate the rust in fuel tanks is unworkable with ethanol equipped fuel. That's no fun.
Anyway if you have rust in the tank, get it empty, and throw in some nuts & bolts, chain, or even rocks and shake rattle and roll to loosen the rust flakes. Flush appropriately, and apply either oil or a protective sealant. Not cheap. POR is mentioned by some, though I haven't used it. One is usable such that you can collect that which doesn't stick to the inner surface, put it back in the container, and use it on another tank. Others are two-part epoxies(?) that once mixed must be used right now.
I'm not too sure about water, but if used, I would add some soap, close it up, shake a bit, then rinse and let dry in the hot sun for a couple hours. Then add whatever coating was selected, even if just oil, and re-install.
tom
 

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Old H-series Tec engines with attached tanks have plastic tanks, so it's likely just dirt and debris in there.

They also make good mini bike engines if the snow blower ever falls apart or becomes less useful. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Old H-series Tec engines with attached tanks have plastic tanks, so it's likely just dirt and debris in there.
Yes, it's a plastic tank on all Tecumseh engines I have (from 1976 to 2005 snow king). All of them on snowblowers. Never had a snowblower with a Briggs, they seem to have metal tanks. And the opposite with the tractors; I have a dozen of them, all the engines are Briggs: single, twin, v-twin except one with a Kohler. Never had a tractor with a Tecumseh of Onan. That kind of old stuff is rare in Quebec :(
 

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How’s the compression, stuck intake valve?
Brass float has a hole and is not floating to shut off the needle in the rubber seat over filling the float bowl.
 
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