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Discussion Starter #1
I've not found a thread on this topic so starting one. I figure if this machine is used to remove snow, it needs better lighting since days are short in Winter and I often do snow removal after dark.

A flashing blue light is industry standard for snow removal equipment. I'm not convinced that red tail lamps are really necessary. One could use red reflective tape or reflectors instead. A white backup light however, to see where you are going would be good to have. I suppose combination tail/brake/backup lamps could be used.

I see there are two threaded holes at the bottom corners of the exhaust guard that could be a convenient place to bolt a pair of small lamps or a single narrow light bar. I do wonder though how much clearance is needed between the bottom of the exhaust and the tires for when turning on uneven ground?

One consideration is to mount lights to the rear bumper instead. That way the light always points in the direction of steer. Drilling and tapping into the cast iron to mount lights would be difficult but one could use the existing holes for the hitch to sandwich a mounting bracket.

Also need to consider whether to have the backup light wired to the high beam* or operate it independently. Not sure how much power the high beam draws and if there is enough power budget to drive the backup light. If no reserve then a relay would be needed.

* The R322TX has a high beam switch.
 

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This is something I've been interested in doing to mine as well, and am looking forward to seeing what you come up with.
I upgraded the headlights on mine to LED's and it's great snow blowing in the dark going forward. Backing up left a lot to be desired. Last winter I made due with my headlamp but it was less than ideal.
I haven't looked very hard into the mounting of a rear light yet but the options looked pretty limited.
 

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Here in the US the standard flashing light for snow removal is yellow / amber. Blue is reserved for Fire / Police emergency vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I regret mentioning blue lights and don't want it to take over this thread. In Ontario Canada, blue lights are used on public highway plows but not allowed on private snow removal equipment. Amber is not limited in the way that blue is and so is a better choice.

I'm considering a short buggy whip (with or without an amber light on top) attached to the rear hitch and a pair of small 2 inch LED floods above the bumper.
 

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I've not found a thread on this topic so starting one. I figure if this machine is used to remove snow, it needs better lighting since days are short in Winter and I often do snow removal after dark.

. If no reserve then a relay would be needed.
I am not questioning your finding about a relay...but could you explain how it would work?...please?...I find relays and their function to be fascinating, but every time I think I understand them I read something like this and it gets me wondering what it will do in this case...thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A relay is a magnetically controlled switch. The power from the existing lighting circuit drives a solenoid using very little amps. The solenoid closes the contacts on the switch which is between the battery and the auxiliary lights so the amperage draw of those lights are directly from the battery, not from the existing lighting circuit.

If you google for images using the words wiring a relay for lights you should see many schematics.
 

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I've not found a thread on this topic so starting one. I figure if this machine is used to remove snow, it needs better lighting since days are short in Winter and I often do snow removal after dark.

A flashing blue light is industry standard for snow removal equipment. I'm not convinced that red tail lamps are really necessary. One could use red reflective tape or reflectors instead. A white backup light however, to see where you are going would be good to have. I suppose combination tail/brake/backup lamps could be used.

I see there are two threaded holes at the bottom corners of the exhaust guard that could be a convenient place to bolt a pair of small lamps or a single narrow light bar. I do wonder though how much clearance is needed between the bottom of the exhaust and the tires for when turning on uneven ground?

One consideration is to mount lights to the rear bumper instead. That way the light always points in the direction of steer. Drilling and tapping into the cast iron to mount lights would be difficult but one could use the existing holes for the hitch to sandwich a mounting bracket.

Also need to consider whether to have the backup light wired to the high beam* or operate it independently. Not sure how much power the high beam draws and if there is enough power budget to drive the backup light. If no reserve then a relay would be needed.

* The R322TX has a high beam switch.
Were you thinking of plowing or blowing/throwing snow?

Lights mounted low works for plowing, but not for blowing snow. Mounting lights too low won’t work well either. The lights on my tractor nearly cover over when blowing snow and they are nearly 2’ off the ground. If folks figure out where to get a cab for your machine, it makes a great place to mount lights for snow blowing.

Typically I run ALL my lights ALL the time even though I have separate light switches for Front and Rear lights. Yes, I replaced the incandescent bulbs with LED’s before adding 4 spot-flood lights to the cab so total draw is around the same as factory lighting. That way the alternator doesn’t have to work too hard or run the risk of draining the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I plan to plow snow and have no plans to add lights to the front, just to the rear. Yes, I agree that up higher is better but there are so few mounting location options on the back that won't affect the needed clearance when turning on uneven ground. I don't want to put lights on top of the engine hood as they would snag branches.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
One other thought I had was to install a hitch receiver so that I can tow a trailer. I don't have a receiver on my Craftsman but do have a fixed ball.

I don't really need to wire for trailer lights per se but if I did, I could install a backup or combination light into the hitch receiver.
 

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In my limited search for finding a spot to mount rear lights I thought coming up with a way to mount a small lightbar or a couple of small led flood lights to the back of the seat might be a good option.
It seemed like they would be well protected and out of the way up there but there might be a bit of a shadow cast on the ground from the engine cover.
The wiring would have to be run to allow for the seat to still be folded as well.
That's about the extent that my research on the issue has gotten though.

Edit: Added a quick rough layout showing shadow/lighting.

R322T Rear Light Layout by Trevoroni, on Flickr
 

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A relay is a magnetically controlled switch. The power from the existing lighting circuit drives a solenoid using very little amps. The solenoid closes the contacts on the switch which is between the battery and the auxiliary lights so the amperage draw of those lights are directly from the battery, not from the existing lighting circuit.

If you google for images using the words wiring a relay for lights you should see many schematics.
So what is the advantage of the relay then?....They both ultimately draw off the battery, which gets charged by the running engine
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So what is the advantage of the relay then?....They both ultimately draw off the battery, which gets charged by the running engine
The lighting circuit can handle only so many amps, starting with the wire and fuse, and the rating on the switch. Manufacturers don't generally oversize the components to allow for additional load.

The relay draws very little current from the existing lighting circuit while letting the lights draw as much current as they need from the battery. In some applications, a relay will be used even where it does not tie into the current lighting circuit. They do that so as to not require heavy gauge wire to be run the distance to where the switch is mounted. You keep the run of heavy wire short by locating the relay close to the battery and then can run a thin wire the distance to the switch. The switch can then tap into an existing nearby circuit and not have to have another long wire back to the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
In my limited search for finding a spot to mount rear lights I thought coming up with a way to mount a small lightbar or a couple of small led flood lights to the back of the seat might be a good option...
Rather than attach it directly to the back of the seat, consider installing a bracket behind the seat so that the seat is free to move.
 

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The lighting circuit can handle only so many amps, starting with the wire and fuse, and the rating on the switch. Manufacturers don't generally oversize the components to allow for additional load.

The relay draws very little current from the existing lighting circuit while letting the lights draw as much current as they need from the battery. In some applications, a relay will be used even where it does not tie into the current lighting circuit. They do that so as to not require heavy gauge wire to be run the distance to where the switch is mounted. You keep the run of heavy wire short by locating the relay close to the battery and then can run a thin wire the distance to the switch. The switch can then tap into an existing nearby circuit and not have to have another long wire back to the battery.
Thank you for taking the time and having the patience to explain it...Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Anyone know of a good colour match on rattlecan paint? I'd like to paint whatever brackets I fab up the same colour as the bumper.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Anyone know of a good colour match on rattlecan paint? I'd like to paint whatever brackets I fab up the same colour as the bumper.
Hmmm.... Did I stump the panel? Seems there are thousands of answers to the question regarding the orange colour but nothing on this colour. I was looking to see what small part I could remove and take with me to the store to try and match up and then realized the little plastic tool to pop the hood is a close match.

I did read that Husqvarna sells a rattlecan of this colour but I'd rather not have to pay what they want for it.

As for the lights themselves, I've yet to find small white LED floods at a reasonable price. I'm thinking now to go with a pair of automotive aftermarket accent lights. As for a flashing amber beacon, I was shopping locally and came across a 2 foot buggy whip with a flashing beacon on top but it was not a stocked part, only something in their catalog. I was promised a quote but did not get one, even after a followup reminder email a week later. I'm not giving up just yet as I will be stopping in there next week on other business.

Another consideration is to go pole mount rather than a buggy whip.
 

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A relay is a magnetically controlled switch. The power from the existing lighting circuit drives a solenoid using very little amps. The solenoid closes the contacts on the switch which is between the battery and the auxiliary lights so the amperage draw of those lights are directly from the battery, not from the existing lighting circuit.

If you google for images using the words wiring a relay for lights you should see many schematics.
Great explanation! That is exactly how I was going to answer that question. :thThumbsU
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I gave up on finding a short buggy whip with amber flashing beacon at any price. Also gave up on finding small white flood lights at a reasonable price.

I decided to go with a Stealth Fire strobe light system that I found on sale at CTC for $45. It has a full-on mode that I can set it to if/when I need backup lights. If I wander out onto the road, I can switch it to a strobe pattern. It's not legal in Ontario to use a flashing white strobe but I will take my chances.
https://www.prostrobe.ca/product/stealth-fire-white-amber-led-strobe-light/

It uses a wireless remote that plugs into a 12V outlet so I picked up an outdoor weatherproof outlet from Menards.
https://www.menards.com/main/tools/automotive/automotive-accessories/automotive-electronics/custom-accessories-reg-exterior-12-volt-power-socket-with-12-cord/10749/p-1444428156403-c-1527167451380.htm

I still need to pick up fuse holders for them to complete the wiring. I started working on a mounting bracket that utilizes the two threaded holes at the bottom corners of the exhaust guard. The bracket is made from aluminum tubing that has two right angle returns. It bridges across the back of the muffler so it will not hang down and interfere with clearance for the tires. I'm undecided whether to leave the aluminum shiny, paint it, or cover it with heat shrink tubing. If I go with heat shrink, I can run the wires inside it rather than drill holes in the aluminum tubing to fish the wires through. Either way, I'd have to cut the wires to fish them through the aluminum tube or the heat shrink tubing and then splice them back together. Since the wires are 10 feet long, I'd want to shorten them up anyway rather than coil up the excess. I can then also run all the wires through wire loom that is not the slotted type.
 

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I'd figure that Husqvanra would have matching cans in stock on their shelves. My Kubota dealer did...but thats probably not the same orange.
 

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