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Discussion Starter #1
My (new to me) Super C is running great but not so sure whether to be concerned about the way the reverse gear engages, or actually doesn't. When I pull the shift lever back, in any operational state, the machine will respond accordingly and reverse direction, but despite adjusting the double nuts on the shifter shaft, it is impossible to actually get it popped into gear. So basically it would seem I am slipping the clutch when putting it into reverse. Any recos as to whether I should pursue getting this corrected or to let it be as is? If it needs to be corrected, is this potentially an 'easy' fix or a tear down?
Thanks,
Mark
1973 Super C
1963 L
 

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So when the lever is directed to the reverse direction the tractor does in fact immediately reverse direction? If this is correct then am I to understand the it is the lever that you cannot get to Lock in reverse much like you can do for forward?

While all but the later L's/C's can be made to have the lever lock in reverse the later C's have a different Few/Rev lever, this newer lever is designed so that you can't lock the lever in reverse, It's a safety feature to keep the operator from being run over.


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From your signature, you have a model that does not lock in reverse (just like mine). If you hold the handle in reverse with nominal pressure then there is no slip. The problem is that you have to hold that pressure continuously while in reverse or it will slip. As cmeyers said, it's a safety feature. They realized that folks were going to need to replace clutches more often, but the safety improvement was worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So when the lever is directed to the reverse direction the tractor does in fact immediately reverse direction? If this is correct then am I to understand the it is the lever that you cannot get to Lock in reverse much like you can do for forward?

While all but the later L's/C's can be made to have the lever lock in reverse the later C's have a different Few/Rev lever, this newer lever is designed so that you can't lock the lever in reverse, It's a safety feature to keep the operator from being run over.


Yes, that is correct, when the lever is directed (back) to the reverse direction, the tractor reverses as expected, as long as the operator applies pressure to the lever. It will not lock and will return to a neutral position, if released.

Thanks, and thanks to Greg for clearing that up for me. It is a bit awkward but having a couple of times over the years tripped myself up going walking backwards with my L , 'tis on the whole a good thing.
 

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My opinion is any walk behind with locked out reverse is much more dangerous on hills. Should it get out of your control rolling backward it is probably going to its demise. My suggestion is that you have a kill switch for your safety under any circumstances including hills. If the key switch you have shuts off the engine that is your kill switch you don't got a lot of time to think about it though. Thank you to the OSHA for all of your infinite wisdom in saving us from ourselves.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Ed, good point. It does have a kill switch in the right handle bar though it is non-operational and I found to be the cause of a no start condition when I first bought it. It has been on my do-list to fix, just haven't reached it yet but given this consideration will move it to hight priority.
 

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I have mentioned before I have a old L and I purposely adjusted the lever so it will not lock into reverse. Of course the old L's worked backwards from yours anyway(push the lever forward to go back).

You can slip the clutch if you want, I slip mine all the time in forward and reverse and have for years. No ill affects from it. I have also mentioned it's best to not lock it in forward and let the clutch slip a little bit when doing certain things. Like bush hogging in unfamiliar areas and I also don't lock it in when pushing snow on a sidewalk. Sometimes the sidewalk is uneven and the blade will catch on the edge.
 

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I spend most of my summertime gravely hours mowing my hillside with a sickle mower. I do three point turnarounds at each end of every pass. They are much safer using locking reverse, as edwardgoodridge said.
 

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I try to go through scenarios in my mind. It was mentioned locking it in reverse on a hill is safer. I guess you guys are thinking if it gets way from you in gear, it will be a controlled ride to the bottom, and if you can get up in time to go after it, you can possibly stop it. The priority there seems to be saving the tractor or saving whatever it may run into.

From my experience, my scenario is the tractor actually running me over. I have done a lot of bush hogging in the woods. When doing that I rarely lock it in forward, and I don't want to lock it in reverse. Too many times I am concentrating on the mower, and have backed up and found myself backing into a tree, with me in between. Too many times I have been backing up and have tripped backwards over one of those pesky vines or roots, and found myself laying on my back with the tractor running right in front of me.

But the beauty of this, we can set it up the way we feel is best and most safe for our uses. You have to keep your wits about you at all times with these things no matter what you do.
 

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Yes, I should have explained myself better. My three-point turnarounds on a hill start by turning uphill and then backing down while turning to position myself for the next pass. The important requirement when doing this is to keep the attachment off the ground to facilitate the quick turn. Pulling downhill and then backing uphill takes significantly more effort to hold the attachment off the ground while turning.

So, you can see that the machine backs downhill toward me at the end of every pass (although it's only for a second or two). If I fall with the handle locked the machine moves more slowly so I have time to move out of the way, and the machine doesn't end up crashing somewhere down the hill).

The situations you describe are the reasons they switched to non-locking reverse.
 

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Steep hills call for duals a kill switch and the sickle is easiest to use I agree with earlier. The swiftamatic trans axle if it fails will free roll the tractor and shutting down does nothing about the rolling maybe a rare accident but it can happen keep it in mind. My objection is the OSHA trying to protect us it is a government intervention that is not always in our best interest. Optional lock out always made the best sense to me.
 

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The models that cannot be locked in reverse have a completely different style F/R shift lever, than the H/L lever. I agree a lever that can be locked, is better on hills. As is duals or a single tire/wheel, mounted on the outside of wheel weights or spacers. Duals will allow the tractor to go "where any man can walk" But can make turns harder. Especially if the tires are aggressive or have chains.
Todd
 
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