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Re: Sulky

I know that my Grandad had a seat spring break on his sulky, but I don't know what he was doing when it happened. He was a tall man but not heavy, and wasn't injured when it happened, even though he was in his seventies or eighties at the time. It was just enough hours on the spring that it cracked and failed. I don't remember if it failed through the rear bolt hole at the base, or in the lower bend. Those are the two places where it would tend to fail. Being steel, I would think it should have shown some visible cracking on the top (tension) surface of the spring prior to catastrophic failure.

On some sulkys, you can see an additional plate below the base of the spring (#17839, plate, reinforcement). This helps reinforce that area and also can decrease the seat spring deflection under load. I added one to my yard roller as the seat bolt would sometimes bounce down into the roller under my weight. It stiffened things up nicely and eliminated the problem.

As to the original question, most Gravelys used the split hitch and ball to attach a riding sulky or other towed equipment when you had an implement on the front. I'm attaching a picture for your reference. The ball was mounted under the rear hitch. It takes two nuts, even though mine only has one, and they are 5/8-18 thread. The front tongue of the sulky or other towed implement is a piece of 1 1/4 Sch 40 pipe. The split hitch is placed around the ball and slid inside the pipe, to be secured by a pin (not shown) run vertically through the pipe and the hole in the split hitch. Here's a link to the manual: http://oldgravelys.net/pdf/Trailing_Hitch_Kit_Op_Man_0576.pdf



There was an older hitch design on some early L's that looked somewhat like a small automotive U-joint, but I don't have any information about them. There also was at least one attachment (the hay rake) that needed an additional piece of pipe to adapt between the implement and the ball hitch. A steering sulky has a fork at the front, and mounts using two bolts (horizontal) as it has to be locked in-line with the tractor to work.

If you are trying to run a Gravely without any implement on the front, as is common when using the roller or cart, you need a slightly different setup. On L's, you needed a piece called the roller rest (pictured below). The hitch ball goes on the socket shown, and the end of the roller rest mounts in the towed implement pipe. The roller on the front of the roller rest rides on a plate on the tractor's hitch. I don't have an L, so I can't show you any pictures. Here's a link to the manual: http://oldgravelys.net/pdf/Roller_Rest_Kit_IPL_0573.pdf


The 500/5000 and later Gravelys used a different hitch component, called the coupler strut, to operate without any front implement. Here's a link to the brochure on that part.
http://oldgravelys.net/pdf/Coupler_Strut_Weldment_Kit_IPL_0572.pdf
 

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