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Discussion Starter #1
My new to me professional 16G rider has turned out to be a disappointment. It runs great but it gets stuck in the snow all the time. It has the 48” snowblower and on the slightest grade it gets stuck. It has turf tires, chains and wheel weights. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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The first thing that I do with the tractors that I use for snow removal is to load the rear tires. My personal preference is to use Rim Guard for its greater density. It is almost 30% heavier per gallon than windshield washer fluid.

The stock 23x8.50-12 tires on a 16G will hold almost 60 lb of Rim Guard each. That combined with the 140 lb engine behind the rear axle should be adequate for the traction that you need. Additional weight can be added at the rear if it is required.

Other than that, you already have good tires and chains for snow duty. A better option for the tires, when they need to be replaced, is Carlisle Multi-Trac CS turf type.
 

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This doesn't seem right. I've never had this problem with any of my Gravelys. Their rear mounted engines help them to perform well in snow. The chains, and weights should be all you need. Is your blower height adjusted so that it scrapes the surface, or does it leave snow residue which would negatively affect traction (especially going uphill)? Do you use low range when blowing snow, or leave it in high range? Also, are you sure that you have the lift rod "pin"going through the correct hole in the rock shaft so that the blower is allowed to lower completely on to the surface when you drop it, so that it's weight is taken off of the tractor? Any weight carried at the front of the tractor would offset weight at the rear tires, and their traction.

I noticed in your first pic that you are approaching snow that has been compacted. I would imagine that as you moved forward, the chains would begin to dig through compacted snow, and the tire(s) would start spinning. It's best to have a solid contact area under the tires when plowing, or blowing snow.
2448865
 

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I noticed in your first pic that your rear tires are already in snow that has been compacted. I would imagine that as you moved forward, the chains would begin to dig through compacted snow, and the tire(s) would start spinning. It's best to have a solid contact area under the tires when plowing, or blowing snow.
And as it appears in that photo you are heading directly into a bank of what appears to be a fairly tight snowbank. Perhaps taking a shallower cut running along the edge rather than directly into it. Of course this is all conjecture since we only have that photo to go by.
MikeC
 

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Eat more donuts. Run along the face of the bank and let the drift cutters shave off as much as traction will allow. Once the bank is down near the blower height, then try head on.
 

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Ok, as a 24 year owner of a 16G used clear a 7,000 sq ft driveway, I will offers few questions and thoughts.

As others have asked, why are you heading directly into a snow bank like that?

Why is there measurable snow under the tractor? You should be clearing to near bare pavement.

You should also have the snow blower all the way on the ground so it can follow the ground contour and not be counterbalancing the rear weight.

That snow blower was not designed to operate "suspended" in air, it should be on the ground.

I have both a 48" blower and a blade, I always use the blade until snow is over 10-12". It is much faster.

I will post some pictures of my snow removal later.

Sheldon
 

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My new to me professional 16G rider has turned out to be a disappointment. It runs great but it gets stuck in the snow all the time. It has the 48” snowblower and on the slightest grade it gets stuck. It has turf tires, chains and wheel weights. Any help would be appreciated.
As has already been said, this seems more a matter of technique, not equipment.

Keep the blower's full weight on the ground, not hanging off the front of the tractor.

Use low range, maybe even low-1 for a mountain like in your picture. Approach that from an angle.

Take a swipe less than the width of your blower. The deeper the snow, the narrower the slice.

Your turf tires and chain are okay. I use Carlisle All Trails with no chains and never seem to have an issue. No chains are gentler on the 7 driveways I do.

2449224
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the reply’s everyone. I was thinking lifting the blower would help but now that you have pointed it out it just pulls weight off the rear. It’s not a paved driveway either so now worry on scratching. But that’s why there is still some snow left behind. In the picture I included it was just messing around so you could get a look at the rig. Again appreciate all the help.
 

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Glad we could all help. The only time you might want to lift the blower slightly would be if the tractor continues straight ahead when trying to make a tight turn. Either that, or back up, and take another less severe cut. Since our tractors have most of their weight in the rear (which is what makes them so good moving snow), they occasionally decide that they want to keep going straight when you turn the steering wheel with a blower mounted, and a slippery surface. Lifting the blower just enough to add a little weight to the front of the tractor will create enough downforce on the front tires so that they can steer the tractor again. Drop the blower back down once the turn is completed.

I'm sure you know that you can adjust the skids so that the blower can be dropped all the way down, but that the intake is just high enough off the ground so that it doesn't pick up gravel, or stones.

It looks like you picked up a very nice tractor too. You will come to appreciate it more, and more as the years go by. Maybe even to the point of picking up a second one. Ask most of us here how we know :)
 
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