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Can't imagine getting a welding stick or mig behind a nut to weld it together...
The trick is to go through the centre of the nut, not behind it. Getting a good ground however without it going through the crankshaft bearings would be challenging.
 

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Could you do that with mig?....I think trying to get a rod in there would arc against the threaded inside wall before you could get it deep enough...certainly worth a try, though
 

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Actually if you can hold a nut on square to the remaining threads, a quick tack in the center of the nut to the bolt with a mig welder or if your good with a stick welder, is worth a try before drilling. I use this trick quite often. The heat helps break the rust bond with expansion and you get another shot at backing the bolt out.
 

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Some great suggestions here...I hope the lady on the other side of the world gets to use them and has positive results, the only thing I would mention at this point is to put never seize thread compound on the replacement bolt.....probably never have to come out again...but just in case..
 

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If it was too tight for an impact I doubt it will ever turn out unless you broke it by turning in the wrong direction. It will I expect be an inch or more of thread. Drilling out that will be a challenge.
 

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Consider this, when you torque a threaded fastener to a certain value, you actually stretch the fastener. Over torqued fasteners tend to break when undone. If an impact gun was used in the wrong direction in an attempt to loosen the bolt, it is possible that the bolt was over stretched and weakened so it snapped when enough force was applied in the opposite direction in trying to loosen it.
 

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That is correct.. or as we call it out here.. anti clockwise...

Well.. UPDATE.. bolt snapped off..
So now the joy of getting that out ?

About two threads showing..
I guess il have to have a crack at welding a nut to this sucker..unless anyone else has a better idea?‍♀

Not sure if you seen my update..
The bolt broke?..
So now.. i have to get that out..
On discussion with an old guy last night.. we came to the conclusion that before i owned this mower.. it may have hit something..
Any how ... now todays mission.. try get old bolt out.. tell me.. if bolt is a yellowish color.. chances are its heat treated??
Well a while back on MTF someone showed how to weld a washer to the broken bolt, then I think a nut on the washer. Seemed to work for them to remove the remainder of the bolt.
 
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Minding my P's & Q's
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Did the pulley come off the crankshaft OK?
If not you need to get that out of your way before you start.

I too am one of those that do this often on stuck bolts. It is the best way in this case because of the heat. Drilling the bolt out has never worked well for me.

I only use a stick welder.
You did say you had a stick welder did you not?

I often weld a large nut to a stuck, rusty bolt before I snap it off.

Or just build up weld on the outside of the head in such a way that I can still get a wrench on it easy. Mainly because the heat from welding will usually make it loosen up.

You could weld a washer to the bolt first, as mentioned above, then weld a hex head nut on. Might be the easiest in your case working under the tractor. Search on MTF for “weld a washer to broken bolt first”.

Some tips.
Attach neg cable to nut on crankshaft at top of engine. Have to remove grass screen. Current goes straight though the crank shaft.

Use small rod. 5/32. Easier to get inside the nut.

Just before you are ready to start welding, Wrap a cold wet rag around crank shaft. Push it up against oil seal. Tie it tight with a string. Will act as a heat sink and stop heat from affecting oil seal. Just don't weld for very long at a time. And then let it cool. Replace wet rag.

I am trying to keep in mind you are doing this from under the tractor.

Will need the tractor up in the air. You will need the room to see what you are doing. Have to at least raise front end and hold it safely in place. Cement blocks? Large diameter blocks of fire wood?

To raise it up use a floor jack? Car jack from your vehicle? Block and tackle? Fresh cut 200 mm diameter log to use as a long lever? Rope over a tree limb and pull it up with a car or truck?

Very important to get the nut straight with the end of the bolt.

Need to come up with a way to hold the nut in place and tight against the end of the bolt. Don't want to weld the nut to the crank shaft. Maybe vise grips to hold the nut?

If you can figure out a way to hold the nut up in place, will free up one hand.

Set things up then do a couple dry runs to be sure you have what you will need within reach. Well worth the time it takes.

I am sure once you do some welding on there the bolt will turn out pretty easy.
Don't get too comfortable laying under the tractor. Might fall asleep.o_O

You probably have the bolt out by now. If not we are all pulling for you.
And please follow up with how you made out.
 

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OK, enlighten me here of why everyone simply assumes that all work on the underside of a lawn tractor has to be done with the tractor sitting upright on all four wheels? Why do you not flip it on the side or even completely over? About the only things I can see are the gas & oil should be drained first.
 

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Not sure that everyone replying to this thread assumed the tractor stay upright. Gas, oil and battery removed unless it is a gel battery. A come along or winch cable over a hefty tree branch lifting the front end so it rotates on the rear wheels would be an easy option IF the original poster had those items available.
 

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I assume not all the necessary equipment, tools, and a helping hand are always there.
One of the great things about MTF is we get a lot of different view points. And different ideas on how to accomplish the task.
 

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I have heavy lag screws in the header of my garage door opening. I then use a chain hoist to lift mowers and decks for easy working height.
 

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Well a while back on MTF someone showed how to weld a washer to the broken bolt, then I think a nut on the washer. Seemed to work for them to remove the remainder of the bolt.
That is probably the best way to go after this problem...that is really ingenious
 

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On some of those MTD tractors, upper belt guides are simply bent flanges around the crank "through hole" on the frame proper.
They aren't removable, and as the frame is a somewhat heavy gauge sheet metal, they aren't really something you can readily bend out and bend back.

That said, I've not often had problems getting the bolt out with an impact wrench and a 5/8" socket (normal righty-tighty, lefty-loosey).
Getting the pulley to slide down afterwards can be a challenge if it's corroded on though, which happens occasionally.
 

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If you are going to try drilling it out then I find smoothing the top with a grinder (if you can reach it) and then using a center punch to start the bit works best. If you are going to weld a nut or bolt to it then have at it just try to keep that centered to the bolt you are removing so that the force is in line with the old broken bolt.
 

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Well here is what I would do. Since the bolt is out the pulley can be removed. take it off and lift the engine out and place it on your bench where you can get at it. You may have to go to new one anyway.

I never heard of that rope trick but don't think much of it. what about the stress on the Connecting Rod? Also too soft. If the rattle wrench was a good working wrench and the socket was the correct size regular rattle wrench socket and it should have removed that darn bolt.

But now we are at the point of extractor mechanics. There are some good suggestions above but I think there is marginal hope for sucess. I would quackabunny go get a new engine and work on this one as the pressure is off.
 

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Since the bolt is out the pulley can be removed. take it off and lift the engine out and place it on your bench where you can get at it.
If it is just as easy to pull the motor than drain it, the fuel tank, and remove the battery so the tractor can be flipped over, then go for it. I've been able to elevate the front of the tractor to get access without all that fuss.

I would quackabunny...
quackabunny? My urban dictionary searches are letting me down.
 

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You're on the right track when you said weld a nut to the broken bolt. Weld it on and fill up the whole nut all in one shot. This will get everything really hot and expand breaking things loose. Don't worry about the heat wrecking the crank seal. It won't get that far. let it cool then back to the impact gun. Hopefully you have strong 1/2" drive pneumatic. Light duty, entry level gun ain't gona cut it. Go at it kind of easy at first. Then give her heck.
 
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